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The gym I trained at in 1982 (derilict photos)

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  • Howard
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post

    Last time I flat benched I did it for ego as was training with a younger guy. Not a good idea. 3 plates a side about a year ago. On tenth rep felt a ping in left pec. Did two more like an idiot. So close to a tear so nothing heavy since.

    Only exercise I go heavy in is rows, but even go pussy on that on the smith. Just feel much more in control
    Also it's always over ten reps and this case was 20 dead stops. No gym for 11 weeks so fuck knows what I'd lift now.

    Good for you ! I love the smith machine and find I can work harder on it , then a reg barbell.
    I always thought reckless behavior was DUMB. Of course, I'm guilty of a doing a few dumb things, but I digress.
    I remember reading about a frat setting their couch on fire at a college in Mass , after the Red Sox finally won the series in 2004.

    LOL, it never dawned on me to set my trophy on fire and throw it into my car windshield after a show LOL.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeUK
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard View Post

    I think the main issue deals with the cost/benefit ration of continued barbell squats and benches , as we age?
    Bob Chic often says, once you've got the foundation built, you don't need 'em .
    Plus, in my view, the risk of injury isn't worth what little you could gain ( compared to similar machine or DB moves)
    Last time I flat benched I did it for ego as was training with a younger guy. Not a good idea. 3 plates a side about a year ago. On tenth rep felt a ping in left pec. Did two more like an idiot. So close to a tear so nothing heavy since.

    Only exercise I go heavy in is rows, but even go pussy on that on the smith. Just feel much more in control
    Also it's always over ten reps and this case was 20 dead stops. No gym for 11 weeks so fuck knows what I'd lift now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post

    True
    Injuries and niggles don't always appreciate squats and bench press
    I think the main issue deals with the cost/benefit ration of continued barbell squats and benches , as we age?
    Bob Chic often says, once you've got the foundation built, you don't need 'em .
    Plus, in my view, the risk of injury isn't worth what little you could gain ( compared to similar machine or DB moves)

    Leave a comment:


  • Beti ona
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post
    One thing for certain. You had to 'have something about you' to train back then.
    It could be called will. The will that is necessary to conquer new and unexplored terrain.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeUK
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard View Post

    In the late 70's , I was a sprinter in New England (states) AAU track meets.
    The event divisions were open and age groups .
    One of the best masters athletes was pole vaulter "Boo" Morcom ( 1948 Olympian)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boo_Morcom

    Most AAU meets around Boston, were low key, informal events.
    So, I was able to speak often with ol' Boo.
    He gave me some timeless wisdom , I've applied to bodybuilding.

    " What age takes away, new technology gives back."
    He loved the advances of plastic fibers that greatly improved the poles in vaulting.

    I revised it a tad to apply to my bodybuilding life
    "What age takes away from my workouts, the new machines give back..
    True
    Injuries and niggles don't always appreciate squats and bench press

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post

    It's easy for us to say our early days were better. The truth is that we'd love to have the equipment of today.

    One thing for certain. You had to 'have something about you' to train back then.
    In the late 70's , I was a sprinter in New England (states) AAU track meets.
    The event divisions were open and age groups .
    One of the best masters athletes was pole vaulter "Boo" Morcom ( 1948 Olympian)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boo_Morcom

    Most AAU meets around Boston, were low key, informal events.
    So, I was able to speak often with ol' Boo.
    He gave me some timeless wisdom , I've applied to bodybuilding.

    " What age takes away, new technology gives back."
    He loved the advances of plastic fibers that greatly improved the poles in vaulting.

    I revised it a tad to apply to my bodybuilding life
    "What age takes away from my workouts, the new machines give back..

    Leave a comment:


  • SISTEROFJESUS
    replied
    cool readin' what yall say in this thread

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeUK
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard View Post

    I'm pretty sure I trained on some versions of "select fitness" machines. Good smooth reps.
    That video reminds me of the old Manchester NH YMCA where I first trained with good bodybuilders.

    You're 100% right that these gyms came from the era where experienced members helped the rookies.
    Trainers and contest prep gurus will blast me, but, that was a better system.
    Yes, you did your own diet and workouts BUT after you got some solid advice.
    You spotted the other lifter , he when he needed a spot.

    I remember posing in a store room that was in the back of the locker room.
    They had a decent spot light with a full length mirror and a smaller one to see your back poses.
    We'd sit around and critique each other after each pose.

    At the contest, we'd even help with applying oiling and pumping up.
    Of course, when you hit the stage, it was a battle.
    It's easy for us to say our early days were better. The truth is that we'd love to have the equipment of today.

    One thing for certain. You had to 'have something about you' to train back then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post

    These gyms were where you learned from old guys. You didn't fuck about unless you were ribbing someone for a failed lift. All types trained together. REAL DIVERSITY not this bullshit selected diversity you see nowadays. No cardio. Nobody ever took photos. No lockers. You felt safe.

    This gym is part of a huge 1930s complex that is empty to this day. Steps to put a lot of money into the complex. I'd love a gym to be part of it.
    Here is video. The gym bits are later on.

    8.20 onwards
    I'm pretty sure I trained on some versions of "select fitness" machines. Good smooth reps.
    That video reminds me of the old Manchester NH YMCA where I first trained with good bodybuilders.

    You're 100% right that these gyms came from the era where experienced members helped the rookies.
    Trainers and contest prep gurus will blast me, but, that was a better system.
    Yes, you did your own diet and workouts BUT after you got some solid advice.
    You spotted the other lifter , he when he needed a spot.

    I remember posing in a store room that was in the back of the locker room.
    They had a decent spot light with a full length mirror and a smaller one to see your back poses.
    We'd sit around and critique each other after each pose.

    At the contest, we'd even help with applying oiling and pumping up.
    Of course, when you hit the stage, it was a battle.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeUK
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard View Post

    I loved the old pics and I consider it to be sacred ruins of a great civilization that mysteriously vanished
    Wouldn't take more then a few benches squat racks and no frills wts, to revive the ol' gym.

    I trained at a small version of that when I started with a bunch of powerlifters.
    The gym was a former WWII era ammo/gun storage room with iron bars on the 1 small window in front.
    The door to the place was heavy, thick steel with a big sliding dead bolt on it.

    It was the one place I learned to really train legs and up my basic lifts.
    These gyms were where you learned from old guys. You didn't fuck about unless you were ribbing someone for a failed lift. All types trained together. REAL DIVERSITY not this bullshit selected diversity you see nowadays. No cardio. Nobody ever took photos. No lockers. You felt safe.

    This gym is part of a huge 1930s complex that is empty to this day. Steps to put a lot of money into the complex. I'd love a gym to be part of it.
    Here is video. The gym bits are later on.

    8.20 onwards

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard
    replied
    Originally posted by GeorgeUK View Post
    1948 is a long time ago

    The 57 year old guy I trained with for 6 months before I found out he was 7 x Mr Scotland and 1 x Mr Britain. He didn't want to boast.
    I was 20
    I loved the old pics and I consider it to be sacred ruins of a great civilization that mysteriously vanished
    Wouldn't take more then a few benches squat racks and no frills wts, to revive the ol' gym.

    I trained at a small version of that when I started with a bunch of powerlifters.
    The gym was a former WWII era ammo/gun storage room with iron bars on the 1 small window in front.
    The door to the place was heavy, thick steel with a big sliding dead bolt on it.

    It was the one place I learned to really train legs and up my basic lifts.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeUK
    replied
    1948 is a long time ago

    The 57 year old guy I trained with for 6 months before I found out he was 7 x Mr Scotland and 1 x Mr Britain. He didn't want to boast.
    I was 20

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Harris
    replied
    Sounds like the kind of place we used to have at least one or two of in every city in the USA at one time - hardcore and no frills, just heavy weights for guys who wanted to get huge and powerful,

    Leave a comment:


  • Beti ona
    replied
    I feel sad, that place must have so many stories and athletes.

    It's funny how the mirrors are kept impeccable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Griff11
    replied
    Originally posted by harmankardon View Post
    Wouldn't take much to get that joint back in action....
    That's what I was thinking

    Leave a comment:

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