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  • Tatyana
    replied
    Good News

    Hey all,

    I am really interested in people being well and healthy for their entire lifespan.

    There is a huge mass of research being done on resistance training/weight training in older people.

    Being that I am standing for well-being for all people, I do have a game plan, and bodybuilding, and competing in it is one of the expressions of this.

    I have very strong convictions that strength training is one of the biggest missings in people's health right now.

    The number one killer of older women is complications from osteoporosis, ususally from pathological fractures from falls.

    I remember reading something in the BMJ (British Medical Journal) that stated one thing that would decrease the number of falls in the elderly is weight training. It is the muscle that stabilises the joints.

    This is just one of the many papers I have found, I will post up more abstracts or PDF files as I find really interesting ones.

    I work as a biomedical scientist in a pathology lab for the National Health Service in England. This next year I will be completing my Master's degree in Clinical Biochemistry, and my project in on macro creatine kinase (also muscle related).

    I am a complete science boffin, and I love molecular biology, it really rocks my world that the molecular pathways for how muscle grows are finally being described.






    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2000 Nov;55(11):M641-8.

    Effects of age, gender, and myostatin genotype on the hypertrophic response to heavy resistance strength training.

    Ivey FM, Roth SM, Ferrell RE, Tracy BL, Lemmer JT, Hurlbut DE, Martel GF, Siegel EL, Fozard JL, Jeffrey Metter E, Fleg JL, Hurley BF.

    Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Maryland College Park 20742, USA.

    BACKGROUND: Because of the scarcity of data available from direct comparisons of age and gender groups using the same relative training stimulus, it is unknown whether older individuals can increase their muscle mass as much as young individuals and whether women can increase as much as men in response to strength training (ST). In addition, little is known about whether the hypertrophic response to ST is affected by myostatin genotype, a candidate gene for muscle hypertrophy.

    METHODS: Eleven young men (25 +/- 3 years, range 21-29 years), 11 young women (26 +/- 2 years, range 23-28 years), 12 older men (69 +/- 3 years, range 65-75 years), and 11 older women (68 +/- 2 years, range 65-73 years) had bilateral quadriceps muscle volume measurements performed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after ST and detraining. Training consisted of knee extension exercises of the dominant leg three times per week for 9 weeks. The contralateral limb was left untrained throughout the ST program. Following the unilateral training period, the subjects underwent 31 weeks of detraining during which no regular exercise was performed. Myostatin genotype was determined in a subgroup of 32 subjects, of which five female subjects were carriers of a myostatin gene variant.

    RESULTS: A significantly greater absolute increase in muscle volume was observed in men than in women (204 +/- 20 vs 101 +/- 13 cm3, p < .01), but there was no significant difference in muscle volume response to ST between young and older individuals. The gender effect remained after adjusting for baseline muscle volume. In addition, there was a significantly greater loss of absolute muscle volume after 31 weeks of detraining in men than in women (151 +/- 13 vs 88 +/- 7 cm3, p < .05), but no significant difference between young and older individuals.

    Myostatin genotype did not explain the hypertrophic response to ST when all 32 subjects were assessed. However, when only women were analyzed, those with the less common myostatin allele exhibited a 68% larger increase in muscle volume in response to ST (p = .056).

    CONCLUSIONS: Aging does not affect the muscle mass response to either ST or detraining, whereas gender does, as men increased their muscle volume about twice as much in response to ST as did women and experienced larger losses in response to detraining than women. Young men were the only group that maintained muscle volume adaptation after 31 weeks of detraining. Although myostatin genotype may not explain the observed gender difference in the hypertrophic response to ST, a role for myostatin genotype may be indicated in this regard for women, but future studies are needed with larger subject numbers in each genotype group to confirm this observation.

    This is really interesting, so age has no bearing on how much muscle you can grow, however, stopping training has a bigger impact on older men, and less of an impact on younger men.

    Men grow more muscle than women (surprise surprise), however they lose more muscle when they stop training (JOY!).

    It also appears that variations in the myostatin gene (or polymorphisms) have more of an effect on women than men (JOY!)

    x
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    T

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  • WillBrink
    replied
    Originally posted by sammiesdad View Post
    Hello, my name is David, and this is my first post here

    I've been lifting weights, off and on, since I was 16 years old. I'm now 52. As I've gotten older, and most significantly in the last five years or so, I've had to make adjustments to compensate for age related changes,

    1) I injure more easily, and heal more slowly. I have to pay much more attention to strict form and careful lifting.
    2) I use rotator cuff and lower back strengthening and stretching routines to minimize injury.
    3) I need more volume...more sets per muscle group...to make any gains.
    4) I need more recovery time.
    5) I no longer tolerate long sessions in the gym. I need to get out well under one hour.
    5) With 3, 4, and 5, above, in mind, I use a four way split...legs, back, chest/shoulders, arms...which allows me sufficient time to get the required volume in under an hour, and I cycle the split once per week, which gives me sufficient recovery time. I wouldn't be surprised if in another decade, I need 10-14 days to recover.
    6) I pay closer attention to pre, intra, and post workout nutrition, to aid recovery.
    7) I no longer give unsolicited advice in the gym. Young guys thing the old guy can't possibly know anything, and they don't like it when their girlfriends ask them why the old guy is bigger and more muscular than they are

    Will Brink told me this was a good forum and that I should give it a try. But, where are the dog and gun threads? Can't have a good forum without dog and gun threads. Really, that would be...absurd.

    David
    Well I am the same in all but 4. I feel I actually need less volume, but more frequency. Right now I am doing something of a hybrid, which is an upper lower split with a whole body, like upper Mon, Lower Wed, whole body Fri. That allows each major bodypart to get hit twice per week but the volume per workout is kept lower. Try to get some aerobic work on the Tue, Thurs, and maybe Sat, but not if I have to shoot an IDPA match! There's your damn gun reference.

    PS, tried to buy www.GunsAndDogs.com but it was taken...

    Leave a comment:


  • Blooming lotus
    replied
    Originally posted by RJP View Post
    Yeah, I started out years ago doing BTN presses and lat pulldowns. That was just what you did and you didn't question it. Luckily I didn't do permanent rotator cuff damage but for years I trained with pain and often could barely bench or do other presses. Once I dropped both, over time my rotator cuffs were completely pain free and for the most part have been ever since.

    Dropping straight bar curls was a factor of a horrible case of tendonitis I got about 7 years ago which got so bad at one point I barely trained bis directly for a little over a year. Once I got to the point where I could train relatively pain free, I only used DBs and warmed up for 2 or 3 sets with very light weight. I eventually got back to about 90% but dropped the straight bar. I say "90%" since to this day while nothing debilitating, I still feel something in the background reminding me it's still there if I want to try something stupid. Most of the time I listen

    It's funny you mention that. Since I've been floating around B.B.ing forums for the past 6 mths or so, It's seeming more and more obvious to me just how big of a risk category for long term if not ' permanent ' for being left untended damage that so many ppl are experiencing through a similar biomechanic. I be;ieve alot of it is coming from whether or not ppl are balancing super and pro nations in heavier lifting exercises and whther or not they're doing something to counteract the hyper state of spine alingment through other sympathetic exercises after the initial heavy load.
    This predicament is seeming soo common and expressing itself in so many different connective tissue and nerve and joint issues that are putting ppl in long term training comprimise and daily discomfort.
    It's really nice to hear that you've had some success in taking a nice slow rehab.. It's a shame there's not more of it for others.

    Leave a comment:


  • octobermagic
    replied
    I'm going to be 39 soon myself. I've been lifting on and off for about 15 years, but really started to "know what I was doing" and put it together the past three years. Three years ago, I also lost a tremendous amount of weight.

    If there's one thing I notice, it's that I don't heal as quickly as I used to. I have lower back problems, and when I was heavier it would act up on me three or four times a year. Now it'll affect me maybe once a year. But when I hurt my back, It takes me about a week to ten days now to feel right again, wheras when I was younger, I'd be good to go in about four to five.

    Leave a comment:


  • sammiesdad
    replied
    Hello, my name is David, and this is my first post here

    I've been lifting weights, off and on, since I was 16 years old. I'm now 52. As I've gotten older, and most significantly in the last five years or so, I've had to make adjustments to compensate for age related changes,

    1) I injure more easily, and heal more slowly. I have to pay much more attention to strict form and careful lifting.
    2) I use rotator cuff and lower back strengthening and stretching routines to minimize injury.
    3) I need more volume...more sets per muscle group...to make any gains.
    4) I need more recovery time.
    5) I no longer tolerate long sessions in the gym. I need to get out well under one hour.
    5) With 3, 4, and 5, above, in mind, I use a four way split...legs, back, chest/shoulders, arms...which allows me sufficient time to get the required volume in under an hour, and I cycle the split once per week, which gives me sufficient recovery time. I wouldn't be surprised if in another decade, I need 10-14 days to recover.
    6) I pay closer attention to pre, intra, and post workout nutrition, to aid recovery.
    7) I no longer give unsolicited advice in the gym. Young guys thing the old guy can't possibly know anything, and they don't like it when their girlfriends ask them why the old guy is bigger and more muscular than they are

    Will Brink told me this was a good forum and that I should give it a try. But, where are the dog and gun threads? Can't have a good forum without dog and gun threads. Really, that would be...absurd.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • drjoe
    replied
    Originally posted by Timski View Post
    Same here Joe,and welcome to the board.
    Thanks, it's a great board!

    Leave a comment:


  • RJP
    replied
    Yeah, I started out years ago doing BTN presses and lat pulldowns. That was just what you did and you didn't question it. Luckily I didn't do permanent rotator cuff damage but for years I trained with pain and often could barely bench or do other presses. Once I dropped both, over time my rotator cuffs were completely pain free and for the most part have been ever since.

    Dropping straight bar curls was a factor of a horrible case of tendonitis I got about 7 years ago which got so bad at one point I barely trained bis directly for a little over a year. Once I got to the point where I could train relatively pain free, I only used DBs and warmed up for 2 or 3 sets with very light weight. I eventually got back to about 90% but dropped the straight bar. I say "90%" since to this day while nothing debilitating, I still feel something in the background reminding me it's still there if I want to try something stupid. Most of the time I listen

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by RJP View Post
    At 40 it's just training a bit smarter (no singles or doubles anymore) and allowing for more rest. I train 2-3x per week mainly due to time but even with unlimited time I'd likely not train much more frequent than that. I come back into the gym fully recovered and fully focussed. I've dropped several exercises over the years due to injuries, both major and minor. These include off the floor deads, straight bar curls and overhead BB press. For me, it's just not worth risking further injury.
    As above, i have dropped behind the neck presses and heavy barbell bench presses and dips. Purely a rotator compromise. I also warm up more on everything.

    Recently tore my calf muscle and had to institute a warm up and stretch for calves as well.

    pretty soon, 90 percent of my workout will be a warmup.

    Leave a comment:


  • RJP
    replied
    At 40 it's just training a bit smarter (no singles or doubles anymore) and allowing for more rest. I train 2-3x per week mainly due to time but even with unlimited time I'd likely not train much more frequent than that. I come back into the gym fully recovered and fully focussed. I've dropped several exercises over the years due to injuries, both major and minor. These include off the floor deads, straight bar curls and overhead BB press. For me, it's just not worth risking further injury.

    As have some others here, I've definitely noticed a slower metabolism over the past couple of years and have found that all things being equal I need to eat much less calories to maintain or lose weight.

    Overall though I still feel great and I'm stronger now than I was at any other point in my life. I'd be lying though if I said I haven't noticed some signs of age (a pain or two that just shouldn't be there). In the end it's all a losing battle but I'm hoping to keep going as long as possible.

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  • Timski
    replied
    Same here Joe,and welcome to the board.

    Leave a comment:


  • drjoe
    replied
    All I know is that I get more out of my workouts then I use to when I was younger. Not only do I train smarter but I benefit more from training because I eat so much better than when I was younger. At 42, I still train heavy, barely take days off and feel great. Peace.

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  • Barbell7
    replied
    Glad to see that there are still many middle age guys still training and handling all their other responsibilities. I am 55 years old and still going at it as best I can. I can say from 28 years of pumping iron that I hold my warmup as the most important aspect of my training since my rotator cuff tear last November. I warm up thoroughly and am not as interested in breaking world stength records which predominated my thinking up until last November. cannot really bench as heavy anyway cause of pain in both shoulders especially the one I injured. I am just grateful taht I can still train. My metabolism is still really fast can eat like a horse and find gaining muscle a challenge even today. Ate so much over the yaers have some digestive issues to contend with.On creatine and various proteins and workout 3 times a week and play tennis intensely a couple times a week with the wife. I tried playing tennis and pumping iron on same day too old for that could do that years ago. Other than that gradually increasing my poundage lifted instead of trying to gain it back all at once. I used to be dumb after a layoff try to use immediately what i was lifting. other than taht i hope to be lifting for life and what pace who knows

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  • athleticmom
    replied
    I am 45 and my body looks better than it did in my 20s. When I turned 40 my mid-life crisis was to push myself athletically much harder and further than ever before...I remember crying tears of joy the first time I finished a 10 mile run. And that was just the beginning.

    As I have pushed myself beyond all expectations, the thing that I have learned the most is to have PATIENCE with myself and REVERENCE for my body. I am also thinking ahead intelligently. For example, I do not want to continue pushing my body through endless endurance activities and I am stepping up the weight training to further protect this precious gift of health I have been given.

    One more thing....it is important to keep learning and to keep an open mind. Yes, my metabolism has dropped as the years have increased but I have been able to make up for that by learning what works diet-wise and by stepping up the discipline needed.

    Just my .02. I still have a lot to learn.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brutal Master
    replied
    Originally posted by NYC BIG MIKE View Post
    I'm 45. I like to lift heavy. I use a EOD day protocol with a 4 way split. 1) Chest and tris and abs. 2) Shoulders and biceps. 3) Back and forearms and abs. 4) Legs. This way I get the recovery I need and hit the whole body in a "8 Day Week". Works for me.


    NYC BIG MIKE

    Mike, its goin good so far. I feel nice and rested. I do the cardio every morning though. I think Ill stick with this format for a while.

    Thanks again

    Leave a comment:


  • Blooming lotus
    replied
    Originally posted by Always Sore View Post
    The thing that changed the most is my knowledge. I know more now then I did at 20 and wish I still had the youthfull energy and easy schedual. At 39 I am stronger and bigger and work much smarter then in my youth. I know how my body responds and what to much is. I think back to all the eat anything workout life and kick myself for not being more focused. At this stage in my life I only hope to pass on to my son what I have learned and if he has the same passion as I do maybe he will take it farther then I did.I can only hope.

    I'm feeling ya loud and clear. Reading Old Navy's post makes me smile aswell. that's quite cool to hear. My Father is an ex - world record holder and I'm trying to encourage him to in 20 yrs or so pull off an over 80's WR:-)...

    Anyway, .. I think you hit it on the head. As we get older, the only thing that seems to prevent alot of ppl from continuing and maintaining or even acheiving for the first time peak levels of fitness, eventually, as far as I can predict and 've noticed in my 32 yrs in the world, seems to comes down to long term lifestyle planning. Once we open that can of worms, it can become pretty damming involved and intimidiating to want to tackle.
    I was at an awesome world fitness level only a cpl of yrs ago, and I am stilll in the thros of restructuring my long term abilty to maintain my ideal daily schedule and asthetic maximum. For myself that's meant i need more money ( and being a buddhist that's meant only via certain means and industries) and it's not so easy on the ego from that point to go back and dot those I's and cross those T's when otherwise we might eek out a certain performance level for a certain time and revel in those laurals and again as a buddhist make enough money to do it all other ways .. and even in regard to the modelling contracts I've had to pass up at $520 000 a yr plus expenses for the last decent offer,but through comprimise of my beliefs. . I've even at tuimes dropped some of both my fitness and asthetic presentation to be able to set up better for a longer term.

    I'd of heart break if I didn't believe I could work out at the level I wanted into old age if i wanted. I look around me at ppl aging and what their prospects are set to expire at or degenerate on and I'm just glad I got a heads up early enough.

    Blooming tianshi lotus.
    Last edited by Blooming lotus; August 12th, 2007, 06:13 AM.

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