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Regular vs Sumo Style Deads

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Addison K. View Post
    In my opinion, conventional deadlift is the true test of deadlift power.

    Sumo deadlifts incorporate your legs much more and are not a true test of back strength.

    I've noticed the majority of monster squatters and women sumo deadlift because their legs are much stronger than their backs.

    Additionally, suits help sumo deadlifts much more because the pop they give off the floor.

    AK
    I'm a raw lifter, so no suit for me it acutally involves the hips more then anything. True tht conventional style doe work the back more, but thats why i see more back injuries with conventional then sumo....I prefer to save my back for when i'm older.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sid View Post
      I'm a raw lifter, so no suit for me it acutally involves the hips more then anything. True tht conventional style doe work the back more, but thats why i see more back injuries with conventional then sumo....I prefer to save my back for when i'm older.
      To me, if you want to test your hip power, you should squat.

      AK

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      • #18
        If you want to build your back, use conv deadlifts. If you are trying to pull the most weight possible, say at a meet, then you have to use what works the best for you. Ed Coan and Andy Bolton, both champion powerlifters, they used conv. Chad Aichs and Chuck Vogelpohl, both champion powerlifters, both use a more sumo stance for pulling. It all depends on what your goals are..Just my two cents boys.

        On a personal note, I watched a video of Chad Aichs at the WPO Finals from 07, that guy is just scary intense. I though this head was going to explode and he was just psyching himself up. Scared the shit out of me.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by GameofInches View Post
          I do regular deadlifts. But a question about sumos, are your feet pointed straight ahead like a regular deadlift, except wider, or are they wider and pointed out to the side (pointing at the plates on the bar)? Thanks!
          You should incorporate both in your training routine. The sumo develops alot more glute, ham, hip strength and will help your squat as well. Your feet are wider than conventional but dont have to be plate to plate wide...you have to find your groove according to your leverages. Your feet are usually pointed slightly out but the straighter they are the more power you can generate but youll need superior hip flexibility to do this.
          P
          Do or Do Not, there is no Try!
          Top Three-Canadian Nationals-Montreal 2008!

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          • #20
            Thats some great info! Makes a lot of sense. Thank you!
            "Strongman is an external view of how pissed off I really am at the world."

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            • #21
              I've done both and always was able to pull more using sumo stance. Conventional does have it's use in my training. Then again I like deadlifts period.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by speedy2 View Post
                Game of Inches,
                I usually do regular deadlifts - but workin' on Sumos now - here's a great pix of what the stance looks like - it's what I've been taught to do & other MDers might chime in:

                Sumo Deadlift

                The Sumo deadlift is a variation of the deadlift whereby the legs are spread far apart to the sides, mimicking the stance of a sumo wrestler. This variation changes the emphasis of the lift and places more work on the hips and legs and a bit less work on the back. Depending on your build the sumo deadlift may be easier to perform then the conventional deadlift.
                When doing the sumo deadlift, rather then focusing on pulling the weight up, focus on keeping your knees out wide and pushing your feet out to the sides as if you are trying to spread the floor apart with your feet. At the same time bring your hips forward. This will improve your leverage and allow you lift more weight.
                Good info. Thanks.
                My journal: http://forums.musculardevelopment.co...=26461&page=64

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                • #23
                  I personally do sumo deads with my leg day and do them like a comp lift do most of the lifting with my legs and snap hips forward. I fit I want to do deads for back I do a rack/pin pull with regular form
                  at getsupps.com Enter Code "MC7OFF" and get 7% off

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                  • #24
                    I prefer conventional. Sumo IMO is stupid . It becomes more of a squat with the bigger pullers. they are to completely different lifts. Im not gonna discredit any one in here who does because thats there choice and preference. There has only been two 900 lb deadlifters sumo. One was very recent like last week. The rest are converntional enough said.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MonsterPower584 View Post
                      I prefer conventional. Sumo IMO is stupid . It becomes more of a squat with the bigger pullers. they are to completely different lifts. Im not gonna discredit any one in here who does because thats there choice and preference. There has only been two 900 lb deadlifters sumo. One was very recent like last week. The rest are converntional enough said.
                      I agree with you.

                      To me they are two different lifts.

                      Also, gear helps sumo deadlifts much more than conventional.

                      AK

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                      • #26
                        I am 6'3" and I am much more comfortable with a shoulder width stance but was told sumo would incorporate more leg muscles and hips. I was also told the same thing in my squatting stance. I have a shoulder width stance on squats and was told to put my feet further apart and point my toes out and try to push my heals through the floor and hinge at the hips like a door. Now I can tell you that in attempting this form with the squats does not feel very comfortable for me. I am trying to get stronger out of the hole, I have good quad strength but hips seem to be weak, perhaps this is why I was given the advice.

                        I have been upset about my deads and squats, me Deadlift is about 560 and my squat is sad!!! I have a real hard time with three sets of 10 with 225,(I do squat down to a 10" box so I am DEEP). Perhaps that is the reason for the "wider" stance idea? What do you all think, not trying to change the thread but I just had this conversation a few days ago.
                        Riff

                        Doing it one pound at a time!!!!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Riff View Post
                          I am 6'3" and I am much more comfortable with a shoulder width stance but was told sumo would incorporate more leg muscles and hips. I was also told the same thing in my squatting stance. I have a shoulder width stance on squats and was told to put my feet further apart and point my toes out and try to push my heals through the floor and hinge at the hips like a door. Now I can tell you that in attempting this form with the squats does not feel very comfortable for me. I am trying to get stronger out of the hole, I have good quad strength but hips seem to be weak, perhaps this is why I was given the advice.

                          I have been upset about my deads and squats, me Deadlift is about 560 and my squat is sad!!! I have a real hard time with three sets of 10 with 225,(I do squat down to a 10" box so I am DEEP). Perhaps that is the reason for the "wider" stance idea? What do you all think, not trying to change the thread but I just had this conversation a few days ago.
                          when you squat, do you break hips first or knees first? most tall guys I know who had trouble squating but have since corrected their form (and now are stronger) where breaking knees first. if you break hips first, IMO, you can squat any stance with comfort, obviously each stance hits the muscle differently and requires practice so strength will not be the same unless you practice at various stances. break hips first, hope that helps.
                          My journal: http://forums.musculardevelopment.co...=26461&page=64

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                          • #28
                            when you squat, do you break hips first or knees first? most tall guys I know who had trouble squating but have since corrected their form (and now are stronger) where breaking knees first. if you break hips first, IMO, you can squat any stance with comfort, obviously each stance hits the muscle differently and requires practice so strength will not be the same unless you practice at various stances. break hips first, hope that helps.
                            Wow! Very true, never even thought of that, I do break at the knees first. that is probably what he meant by folking like a door at the hips...hinged almost,

                            Thanks, I will think about that as I set down in my squat
                            Riff

                            Doing it one pound at a time!!!!

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                            • #29
                              I've pulled both ways in competition but am currently stronger conventional. That being said I still train both ways as there is some carry over to each other.

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                              • #30
                                As I read these responses another question came to mind in regards to deadlifts...

                                In conventional stance, I've seen some deadlifters grip the barbell while it's on the ground and roll it away from them and then pull the weight along the ground (albeit "rolling" the weight) and pull into a deadlift. The distance of the roll is about 3 feet.

                                I'm a little newer into powerlifting and was curious what the reasoning might be in doing this.

                                Sorry for the digression.

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