Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Multivitamin Use in Relation to Self-Reported Body Mass Index & Weight Loss Attempts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Multivitamin Use in Relation to Self-Reported Body Mass Index & Weight Loss Attempts

    Multivitamin Use in Relation to Self-Reported Body Mass Index and Weight Loss Attempts

    Joel E. Kimmons, PhD; Heidi Michels Blanck, MS, PhD; Beth Carlton Tohill, MPH, PhD; Jian Zhang, DrPH; Laura Kettel Khan, PhD

    Abstract

    Context: There are scant data on patterns of multivitamin use among US adults in terms of body mass index (BMI) or whether one is trying to lose weight.

    Objective: To examine multivitamin use and beliefs about multivitamin use among adults according to BMI and to determine whether use by body weight differs if one is trying to lose weight.

    Design: Cross-sectional multivariate analysis of the HealthStyles consumer survey. The final analytic sample consisted of 2239 women and 1532 men.

    Main Outcome Measures: Prevalence and odds of multivitamin use by demographic and behavioral characteristics including BMI, use by weight loss intent, and among users, reasons for use.

    Results: 63.7% of women and 52.9% of men reported multivitamin use (taking 1 or more multivitamin per week). Obese women were less likely than normal-weight women to use multivitamins; no differences according to BMI category were detected for men. Among women who were not trying to lose weight, obese women were less likely than normal-weight women to use multivitamins (odds ratio = 0.63, CI 0.41-0.98). Assessment of reasons for use found that compared among women not trying to lose weight, those trying to lose weight were more likely to report multivitamin use because "It is important for my health."

    Conclusions: This descriptive analysis adds to the limited literature on multivitamin use according to both body weight and attempting to lose weight. Multivitamin use was common and decreased with increasing BMI. This may be because fewer obese people consider vitamins "important for their health."

  • #2
    Someone should tell the fatties about these:

    Heretic

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dvsness View Post
      Multivitamin Use in Relation to Self-Reported Body Mass Index and Weight Loss Attempts

      Joel E. Kimmons, PhD; Heidi Michels Blanck, MS, PhD; Beth Carlton Tohill, MPH, PhD; Jian Zhang, DrPH; Laura Kettel Khan, PhD

      Abstract

      Context: There are scant data on patterns of multivitamin use among US adults in terms of body mass index (BMI) or whether one is trying to lose weight.

      Objective: To examine multivitamin use and beliefs about multivitamin use among adults according to BMI and to determine whether use by body weight differs if one is trying to lose weight.

      Design: Cross-sectional multivariate analysis of the HealthStyles consumer survey. The final analytic sample consisted of 2239 women and 1532 men.

      Main Outcome Measures: Prevalence and odds of multivitamin use by demographic and behavioral characteristics including BMI, use by weight loss intent, and among users, reasons for use.

      Results: 63.7% of women and 52.9% of men reported multivitamin use (taking 1 or more multivitamin per week). Obese women were less likely than normal-weight women to use multivitamins; no differences according to BMI category were detected for men. Among women who were not trying to lose weight, obese women were less likely than normal-weight women to use multivitamins (odds ratio = 0.63, CI 0.41-0.98). Assessment of reasons for use found that compared among women not trying to lose weight, those trying to lose weight were more likely to report multivitamin use because "It is important for my health."

      Conclusions: This descriptive analysis adds to the limited literature on multivitamin use according to both body weight and attempting to lose weight. Multivitamin use was common and decreased with increasing BMI. This may be because fewer obese people consider vitamins "important for their health."
      No cite for that to go with with the title?
      Will Brink @ www.BrinkZone.com

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1781274
        My web site : http://www.michaelgundill.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Deserusan View Post
          Someone should tell the fatties about these:

          Oh snap....gummies are awesome!

          Comment


          • #6
            I have tried various types of multivitamins that you can purchase at grocery stores but none work as well as the Dr Max Powers MultiVitamin.

            Most athletes have a higher requirement of vitamins and minerals. As a result, they need a product that can meet this requirement. The Dr Max MultiVitamin keeps me energized throughout my day and I have noticed much better gains and a shorter recovery time. Although they are expensive for the amount of servings you get, this product is the only one I have used that lives up to its claim.

            One thing I would suggest all users to remember is to drink tons of water. The more nutrients you consume the more water you should drink. This product is loaded with nutrients and there is a possibility of dehydration if you are not consuming enough water.

            Comment

            Working...
            X