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EQUINE GROW HORMONE (EGH)

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  • Paulpoon
    replied
    Equine growth hormone will NOT work on humans because human growth hormone receptors only bind primate growth hormones. Horses (equine) are not primates. What you guys need is human growth hormone (HGH)

    https://www.drugbank.ca/categories/DBCAT000145

    The specificity is determined by 1 arginine amino acid in the receptor
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC42616/

    Leave a comment:


  • Iason
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Arnold View Post
    Stalin wanted to breed half man half ape soldiers



    Life gets more like the movies every day. In the mid 1920s, Josef Stalin noticed that communist Russia was missing something. Respect for individual human lives? No! An army of half-man-half-ape super-warriors? You betcha. This may have been the first attempt to breed Orcs.

    THE Soviet dictator Josef Stalin ordered the creation of Planet of the Apes-style warriors by crossing humans with apes, according to recently uncovered secret documents.

    Moscow archives show that in the mid-1920s Russia's top animal breeding scientist, Ilya Ivanov, was ordered to turn his skills from horse and animal work to the quest for a super-warrior.

    According to Moscow newspapers, Stalin told the scientist:

    ... Quote:
    I want a new invincible human being, insensitive to pain, resistant and indifferent about the quality of food they eat.



    In 1926 the Politburo in Moscow passed the request to the Academy of Science with the order to build a "living war machine".

    The order came at a time when the Soviet Union was embarked on a crusade to turn the world upside down, with social engineering seen as a partner to industrialisation: new cities, architecture, and a new egalitarian society were being created.

    The Soviet authorities were struggling to rebuild the Red Army after bruising wars.

    And there was intense pressure to find a new labour force, particularly one that would not complain, with Russia about to embark on its first Five-Year Plan for fast-track industrialisation.

    Mr Ivanov's ideas were music to the ears of Soviet planners and in 1926 he was dispatched to West Africa with $200,000 to conduct his first experiment in impregnating chimpanzees.

    Meanwhile, a centre for the experiments was set up in Georgia - Stalin's birthplace - for the apes to be raised.

    Mr Ivanov's experiments, unsurprisingly from what we now know, were a total failure. He returned to the Soviet Union, only to see experiments in Georgia to use monkey sperm in human volunteers similarly fail.

    A final attempt to persuade a Cuban heiress to lend some of her monkeys for further experiments reached American ears, with the New York Times reporting on the story, and she dropped the idea amid the uproar.

    Mr Ivanov was now in disgrace. His were not the only experiments going wrong: the plan to collectivise farms ended in the 1932 famine in which at least four million died.

    For his expensive failure, he was sentenced to five years' jail, which was later commuted to five years' exile in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan in 1931. A year later he died, reportedly after falling sick while standing on a freezing railway platform.

    From
    http://news.scotsman.com/in...

    with the intro from
    http://www.seedmagazine.com...
    he did what he thought good for his country

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Arnold
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Arnold View Post
    Stalin wanted to breed half man half ape soldiers



    Life gets more like the movies every day. In the mid 1920s, Josef Stalin noticed that communist Russia was missing something. Respect for individual human lives? No! An army of half-man-half-ape super-warriors? You betcha. This may have been the first attempt to breed Orcs.

    THE Soviet dictator Josef Stalin ordered the creation of Planet of the Apes-style warriors by crossing humans with apes, according to recently uncovered secret documents.

    Moscow archives show that in the mid-1920s Russia's top animal breeding scientist, Ilya Ivanov, was ordered to turn his skills from horse and animal work to the quest for a super-warrior.

    According to Moscow newspapers, Stalin told the scientist:

    ... Quote:
    I want a new invincible human being, insensitive to pain, resistant and indifferent about the quality of food they eat.



    In 1926 the Politburo in Moscow passed the request to the Academy of Science with the order to build a "living war machine".

    The order came at a time when the Soviet Union was embarked on a crusade to turn the world upside down, with social engineering seen as a partner to industrialisation: new cities, architecture, and a new egalitarian society were being created.

    The Soviet authorities were struggling to rebuild the Red Army after bruising wars.

    And there was intense pressure to find a new labour force, particularly one that would not complain, with Russia about to embark on its first Five-Year Plan for fast-track industrialisation.

    Mr Ivanov's ideas were music to the ears of Soviet planners and in 1926 he was dispatched to West Africa with $200,000 to conduct his first experiment in impregnating chimpanzees.

    Meanwhile, a centre for the experiments was set up in Georgia - Stalin's birthplace - for the apes to be raised.

    Mr Ivanov's experiments, unsurprisingly from what we now know, were a total failure. He returned to the Soviet Union, only to see experiments in Georgia to use monkey sperm in human volunteers similarly fail.

    A final attempt to persuade a Cuban heiress to lend some of her monkeys for further experiments reached American ears, with the New York Times reporting on the story, and she dropped the idea amid the uproar.

    Mr Ivanov was now in disgrace. His were not the only experiments going wrong: the plan to collectivise farms ended in the 1932 famine in which at least four million died.

    For his expensive failure, he was sentenced to five years' jail, which was later commuted to five years' exile in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan in 1931. A year later he died, reportedly after falling sick while standing on a freezing railway platform.

    From
    http://news.scotsman.com/in...

    with the intro from
    http://www.seedmagazine.com...
    Is there anything that you don't know something about? Those experiments don't surprise me in the least and I would not be surprised if someone was currently conducting such research and experimentation right now, with probably much more head-way, than was acheived back in the twenties. I'm sure that such research would be considerd Code Word Top Secret, here in the U.S.

    Thanks again for a thouroughly entertaining post. I must wonder what thoughts must go through your head to have looked into such things; probably something similar to mine. Ha ha. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Arnold
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    Wouldn't be surprised to one day see some freak geneticist decide to amalgamate a cross between a human and an animal, in order to to come up with some new type of job-specific super human. Maybe then they may reconsider picking up the research where they left off. LOL. The funny thing is, it probably isn't too far away from the truth. The research is probably already being done under some government funded agency. .
    Stalin wanted to breed half man half ape soldiers



    Life gets more like the movies every day. In the mid 1920s, Josef Stalin noticed that communist Russia was missing something. Respect for individual human lives? No! An army of half-man-half-ape super-warriors? You betcha. This may have been the first attempt to breed Orcs.

    THE Soviet dictator Josef Stalin ordered the creation of Planet of the Apes-style warriors by crossing humans with apes, according to recently uncovered secret documents.

    Moscow archives show that in the mid-1920s Russia's top animal breeding scientist, Ilya Ivanov, was ordered to turn his skills from horse and animal work to the quest for a super-warrior.

    According to Moscow newspapers, Stalin told the scientist:

    ... Quote:
    I want a new invincible human being, insensitive to pain, resistant and indifferent about the quality of food they eat.



    In 1926 the Politburo in Moscow passed the request to the Academy of Science with the order to build a "living war machine".

    The order came at a time when the Soviet Union was embarked on a crusade to turn the world upside down, with social engineering seen as a partner to industrialisation: new cities, architecture, and a new egalitarian society were being created.

    The Soviet authorities were struggling to rebuild the Red Army after bruising wars.

    And there was intense pressure to find a new labour force, particularly one that would not complain, with Russia about to embark on its first Five-Year Plan for fast-track industrialisation.

    Mr Ivanov's ideas were music to the ears of Soviet planners and in 1926 he was dispatched to West Africa with $200,000 to conduct his first experiment in impregnating chimpanzees.

    Meanwhile, a centre for the experiments was set up in Georgia - Stalin's birthplace - for the apes to be raised.

    Mr Ivanov's experiments, unsurprisingly from what we now know, were a total failure. He returned to the Soviet Union, only to see experiments in Georgia to use monkey sperm in human volunteers similarly fail.

    A final attempt to persuade a Cuban heiress to lend some of her monkeys for further experiments reached American ears, with the New York Times reporting on the story, and she dropped the idea amid the uproar.

    Mr Ivanov was now in disgrace. His were not the only experiments going wrong: the plan to collectivise farms ended in the 1932 famine in which at least four million died.

    For his expensive failure, he was sentenced to five years' jail, which was later commuted to five years' exile in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan in 1931. A year later he died, reportedly after falling sick while standing on a freezing railway platform.

    From
    http://news.scotsman.com/in...

    with the intro from
    http://www.seedmagazine.com...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Arnold
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Arnold View Post
    well they say bovine GH works in the horse so who is to say horse GH does not work in a human? Actually i never could get a straight answer on whether or not bovine GH works in a human at all

    yes the structures of these are different (actually porcine GH is pretty close to human) but it is known that there are cross activities of each among species

    The downside is that you are taking a serious chance because your body may develop a serious immune response. Worst case scenario is shock and death

    Wow, thanks bro. I'm kind of shocked that you jumped in on the thread. I've looked up to you for several years now and have followded your career from your original andro days. Thanks for the response.

    When I first saw that you had responded to my post, I thought "oh shit, Pat Arnold is going to tear my statement up and make me look like a fool".

    Very interesting though that human GH can work in horses. It makes me wonder why or how this is possible, being that the study you pulled up showed no cross-effect in humans when GH from other animals was administered to them. However, I guess at this point further research wouldn't be necessary, now that we have synthetic HGH. Wouldn't be surprised to one day see some freak geneticist decide to amalgamate a cross between a human and an animal, in order to to come up with some new type of job-specific super human. Maybe then they may reconsider picking up the research where they left off. LOL. The funny thing is, it probably isn't too far away from the truth. The research is probably already being done under some government funded agency. Certainly, genetic decoding and the combining of DNA has surely already begun. We most likely won't hear about it for a generation or so. That's a scary day.

    Pat...your like a hero in our industry brother. It's awesome to have you here.

    Leave a comment:


  • TrashMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Arnold View Post
    well they say bovine GH works in the horse so who is to say horse GH does not work in a human? Actually i never could get a straight answer on whether or not bovine GH works in a human at all

    yes the structures of these are different (actually porcine GH is pretty close to human) but it is known that there are cross activities of each among species

    The downside is that you are taking a serious chance because your body may develop a serious immune response. Worst case scenario is shock and death
    Sounds like dbol. Those sides aren't that bad. Haha.

    Good luck if you try this shit bro.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Arnold
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    As far as what would happen if we were to administer a different form of GH into our body's and what, if any, physiologic would occur, I don't know? Perhaps there is some type of research or experiment out there that has looked into this.
    i just googled

    Observations in humans

    During the 1950s several clinical trials were conducted of the
    injection of pituitary preparations derived from farm animals,
    including pigs, into humans for treatment of dwarfism. Although some
    of the initial studies were thought to show an effect, the porcine
    pituitary preparations did not stimulate growth in humans (Raben,
    1959; Kaplan, 1965) or in hypophysectomized monkeys (Knobil & Greep,
    1959). Serum triglycerides were not affected in humans (Raben, 1959).
    Mills et al. (1976) also failed to detect any metabolic activity for
    the retention of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and
    chloride; they found no increase in plasma free fatty acids, no
    decrease in plasma alpha-amino nitrogen, no impaired glucose
    tolerance, and no hyperinsulinaemia in growth hormone-deficient
    children after injection of either native pST or serum
    plasmin-digested pST. It was concluded that somato-tropins were
    species-limited with somatotropins from lower species having no
    activity in humans. The biological basis for this species specificity
    was discovered years later when it was determined that the binding of
    pST to the human somatotropin receptor is several orders of magnitude
    lower than that of human somatotropin (Carr & Friesen, 1976).

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Arnold
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    Dude, I have no idea what this stuff is, but I'll tell you this. If it's made for a horse, don't use it! The GH that a human body produces and the GH that a horse produces are two completely different things. You cannot subsitute one for the other as they are different drugs altogether. Stay away from it1

    If you want to learn more about it, simply do a search on it. You will most likely pull up a lot of hits to read up on. Start with the manufacturer and go from there.

    well they say bovine GH works in the horse so who is to say horse GH does not work in a human? Actually i never could get a straight answer on whether or not bovine GH works in a human at all

    yes the structures of these are different (actually porcine GH is pretty close to human) but it is known that there are cross activities of each among species

    The downside is that you are taking a serious chance because your body may develop a serious immune response. Worst case scenario is shock and death

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Arnold
    replied
    No problem. thats why were here...to learn from others who have experience or knowledge. We can all learn something from somebody.

    Leave a comment:


  • ARISTIMUQOH
    replied
    Thanks Mike and Mitch...
    Last edited by ARISTIMUQOH; May 18th, 2009, 06:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mitch903
    replied
    Very informative post Mike. I see your point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Arnold
    replied
    No. Equipoise and Stanzolol are AAS and are the same whether they're used in humans or Animals. They have the same chemical make-up regardless of who or what they're prescribed for. Growth Hormone is growth hormone as long as it's human groth hormone. The GH that a pig, horse, cow, chimpanzee and human make are all different with different molecular structures. Why do you think that they used to extract GH from human cadavers before the advent of synthetic GH? Wouldn't GH manufacture be easier and more abundant if they could randomly extract the GH from any animal? Is it because they preferred a dead persons GH over a living animal? NO. The reason is that an animal's GH and a person's GH are different, just like the insulin from a pig is different from a humans. In fact, the similarities between a pigs insulin and a human's are much greater than our differences in GH.

    All mammals have a completely different set of DNA that require a different type of GH to activate and trigger the physiologic response that is generated by that particular set of DNA. Just as we cannot throw a set of Horse DNA into a test tube and make a human; we cannot randomly administer GH from any living creature to a human and expect it deliver the same physiologic responses that our own GH would produce.

    Steroids are steroids and can be used in any mammal (with varying side effects), but GH is highly specific to the organism for which it is was designed.

    As far as what would happen if we were to administer a different form of GH into our body's and what, if any, physiologic would occur, I don't know? Perhaps there is some type of research or experiment out there that has looked into this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mitch903
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    Dude, I have no idea what this stuff is, but I'll tell you this. If it's made for a horse, don't use it! The GH that a human body produces and the GH that a horse produces are two completely different things. You cannot subsitute one for the other as they are different drugs altogether. Stay away from it1

    If you want to learn more about it, simply do a search on it. You will most likely pull up a lot of hits to read up on. Start with the manufacturer and go from there.
    Do you think this way of equipoise and stanzolol?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Arnold
    replied
    Dude, I have no idea what this stuff is, but I'll tell you this. If it's made for a horse, don't use it! The GH that a human body produces and the GH that a horse produces are two completely different things. You cannot subsitute one for the other as they are different drugs altogether. Stay away from it1

    If you want to learn more about it, simply do a search on it. You will most likely pull up a lot of hits to read up on. Start with the manufacturer and go from there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mitch903
    replied
    http://joe.endocrinology-journals.or.../171/1/163.pdf

    Leave a comment:

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