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Diet: Warrior's 14-Day CKD for Pre-Cycle Priming :.

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  • Diet: Warrior's 14-Day CKD for Pre-Cycle Priming :.

    Alright, my intentions here are to provide a plan for something I preach about all the time: a pre-cycle prime. The goal before starting a bulking phase is to get your self prepared mentally and physically for the surge of nutrition, heavy and progressive training and, if so desired, anabolic hormones.

    Starting a cycle with too much fat puts you at a disadvantage - a greater likliness to gain fat over muscle while over-feeding(Forbes); whereas a relative contribution of lean and fat mass in weight change is influenced by the initial body fat content. To complicate an anabolic cycle, increased interaction with aromtase occurs in overweight people. High body fat levels are linked to insulin resitance and metabolic disorders - not good for proper calorie partitioning and muscle gain.

    I hate to be one to preach a problem without providing a solution... so this is my solution. It's tried a true. If your bodyfat is too high, try a couple cycles through this 14-Day CKD before your next cycle. Let me know how you do and any changes you made along the way. I would suggest at least three to four rotations (6-8 weeks) before you begin your cycle. It's not difficult, it just takes consistancy and discupline to stick to it... all the while you should be getting pent up to start your AAS-assisted growth spurt.

    Have fun!

    Warrior’s 14-Day CKD for fat loss
    November 06th, 2007

    Carbohydrate cycling is an effective method for bodybuilders who want to lose fat while preserving a lot of muscle. Two dietary periods are used: glycogen depletion and carbohydrate loading. During carbohydrate restriction, a state of ketosis develops as stored glycogen in liver and muscle tissue depletes. This accelerates fat as a source of energy – consumed through the diet or stored within adipose tissue. I recently finished a 14-day cyclic-ketogenic diet to illustrate how this works. Prior to beginning, I did a seven-day CKD variation for a few weeks, then detrained (no training) for one week. I started at 248 pounds; target weight was 228, glycogen loaded. I ended at a hard 227, glycogen loaded and drug free.

    The 14-day CKD plan consisted of two, week-long, phases. The first week, a glycogen depletion period is interrupted with a mid-phase carbohydrate meal. An evening carbohydrate load partially replenishes glycogen; right after, it is back to depleting again. This carbohydrate intervention is used to help further deplete glycogen by only briefly exiting ketosis. The temporary exodus allows a brief transfer back to preferring carbohydrates for fuel – to scrape the glycogen barrel – then a quick return back into ketosis for optimal fat burning. This maximizes fat burning and muscle retention.

    Glycogen super compensation is attempted every 14 days with a carbohydrate load. Near the conclusion of the second week, a full 36-hour carbohydrate load begins the evening after a full-body depletion routine. The day after the carbohydrate load is a strong power routine with a high-carbohydrate diet at a maintenance caloric intake – to help top off glycogen while providing an opportunity to maintain strength levels. Then the 14-day cycle is repeated.

    Warrior’s 14-day CKD: integrated diet and training strategy

    ============FIRST HALF============
    Day 1: Moderate Carb: 60 minutes of cardio; abdominal/calve training.
    Day 2: Low Carb: Chest and Back Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 3: Low Carb: Quads and Hamstring Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 4: Low Carb: 45-60 minutes of cardio
    Day 5: Preload Carb: Depletion Routine; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 6: Low Carb: No Training
    Day 7: Low Carb: Delts, Triceps and Biceps Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    ===========SECOND HALF===========
    Day 8: Low Carb: Cardio-only; 60 minutes of cardio; abdominal/calve training.
    Day 9: Low Carb: Chest and Back Tension Training; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 10: Low Carb: Quads and Hamstring Tension Training (w/abs, calves); 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 11: Low Carb: 50-60 minutes of cardio
    Day 12: Preload Carb: Depletion Routine; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 13: Carb Load: No Training
    Day 14: High Carb: Loaded Routine; 20 minutes of cardio

    ============REPEAT============

    Low Carb: basically meats, eggs and fibrous veggies; around 30-50 grams of carbohydrates. The only intentional carbohydrate intake should be post-workout with a heavy emphasis on protein. Take 10 grams of BCAA’s pre-workout. A post-workout mix of glutamine, whey, and creatine would serve up well: about 3 parts, 3 parts, 1 part, respectively; mixed with half of an orange or banana.
    Preload Carb: Same as a Low Carb, but with slightly less calories during the day. The carbohydrate preload begins in the evening with around 30 grams pre-workout. This can help further deplete glycogen during the training session – 30 grams burns quickly, leaving the body scavenging for more. Immediately after the workout, a heavy carbohydrate and protein shake should be consumed. Then move into a full carbohydrate load, or binge. The first week employs this Preload Carb day but carbohydrate intake ends that night and it’s back to low carbohydrate dieting the next day. The second week moves on to a Carb Load day, where expedited glycogen super compensation is the goal.
    Carb Load: An all-out binge of carbohydrates and proteins - trying to eat every hour. Nutrient intake can easily exceed over 5000 kcal, depending on lean body mass. Play with the caloric intake levels, but avoid high-fat foods after the initial 12 to 14 hours from the time the load began, the night before. It’s common to feel bloated with some gastro-intestinal discomfort. Creatine monohydrate and dextrose should accompany the glycogen load.
    High Carb: Maintenance calories at roughly 60 percent carbohydrate, 25 percent protein and 15 percent fat.
    Moderate Carb: A slight drop in calories - to create a defecit - with roughly 40 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent protein and 30 percent fat. The day’s carbohydrate intake ends in the afternoon.

    DAILY NUTRITION: A daily multivitamin/mineral shoud be taken during this restrictive diet to support systemic bodily functions. Three grams of a fish oil supplement will increase the omega-3 content of each meal. Around four grams of Vitamin C will help keep you well and burning fat. Additionally, stimulants can help keep energy elevated but try to avoid caffeine on Carb Load days.

    Training guidelines for Warrior’s 14-day CKD

    Depletion workouts the first week use German Body Composition for Chest and Back; Quadriceps and Hamstrings; Shoulders and Arms. GBC is a training outline originated by Charles Poliquin, a great strength coach. It is based on short rest intervals to increase production of lactate, which leads to dramatic increases in endogenous growth hormone spurts, thus resulting in greater body fat loss. The second half, drop with GBC training and move to Tension Training. The goal the second week is simply keep the muscles trained.

    On the Preload Carb days, a full-body Glycogen Depletion Routine is used to finish depleting muscular glycogen throughout the body. This helps maximize glycogen uptake sensitivity in all muscle groups prior to ingesting carbohydrates. The goal is to exhaust glycogen throughout the body, prior to a carbohydrate load – not make monumental gains in strength. An opportunity for power training comes after the load, when energy levels are restored.

    The day after a carbohydrate load, a Carb/Creatine Loaded Routine is performed as a full body power routine prior to beginning another depletion phase. The main goal of this routine is to move heavier weight - power train. This is the most important routine to monitor limit strength and muscle preservation. The total time to completion for the routine is also a significant variable – if you move the same loads but the workout is taking you 20 minutes longer, this is not a good sign.

    GBC Training
    This resistance training program is divided into these muscle groups with the same movements for the duration of the program. Giant sets are grouped in sequence by letters and performed in order by number.
    Chest and Back
    Chest
    A1: (6) Flat Barbell Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) 45 Degree Incline Dumbbell Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) 30 Degree Incline Dumbbell Flye
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Back
    B1: (6) Wide Grip Pull Ups
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Bent Barbell Rows
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Close Grip Front Pulldowns
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Quadriceps and Hamstrings
    Quads
    A1: (6) Full Barbell Squats
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) Hammer Strength Hack Squats
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) Hammer Strength Quad Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Hams
    B1: (6) Hammer Strength Leg Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Romanian Deads
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Back Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Shoulders and Arms
    Delts
    A1: (6) Front Military Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) Standing Dumbbell Laterals
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) Standing Upright Rows
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Triceps
    B1: (6) Flat Close Grip Presses
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Incline Triceps Extensions
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Standing Rope Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Biceps
    C1: (6) Incline Dumbbell Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    C2: (12) Standing Barbell Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    C3: (25) Standing Reverse Grip Cambered Curls
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times

    Tension Training
    This routine divides the body’s muscle systems into two workouts. To monitor changes in limit strength, continue to use the same movements for the duration of the program. The static training should track the amount of time the muscle can hold the load in the fully contracted position.
    Upper Body
    (2X10) Barbell Bench Press
    (2X12) Wide Grip Pull Ups
    (2X12) Hammer Strength Incline Press
    (2X12) Hammer Strength Close-Grip Rows
    (2X15) Machine High-Pulley Crossovers
    (2X15) Incline Dumbbell Shrugs
    Rest Interval: Variable
    Lower Body
    (1X10,1X20) Leg Press
    (2X15) Hammer Strength Leg Extension
    (2X15) Machine Standing Iso-Lateral Leg Curls
    (T sec) Static Hammer Calve Raise
    (T sec) Static Straight-Leg Raises
    Rest Interval: Variable

    The Glycogen Depletion Routine
    This routine (setsXreps) should use the same movements, number of sets and repetitions, in the same order, to monitor changes in limit strength.
    (2X15) Full Barbell Squats
    (2X10) Hammer Strength Leg Curls
    (2X15) Hammer Strength Quad Extensions
    (2X20) Seated Calve Raise
    (2X12) Barbell Bench Press
    (2X12) Bent Barbell Rows
    (2X12) Military Front Press
    (2X15) Close Grip Pulldowns
    (2X10) Incline Tricpes Extensions
    (2X10) Standing Barbell Curls
    (2X20) Back Extensions
    (2X20) Rope Crunches

    The Carb/Creatine Loaded Routine
    This routine (setsXreps) should use the same movements, number of sets and repetitions, in the same order, to monitor changes in limit strength.
    (5X6) Full Barbell Squats
    (5X3) Rack Dead Lifts
    (5X5) Barbell Bench Press

    Cardio/Endurance Training
    Cardio must exploit key opportunities to burn fat. If possible, morning cardio should be performed but time of day won’t matter after a few days of glycogen depletion training. At that point, any opportunity to do cardio is a plus. Stationary cycling is a good option, especially as glycogen and energy gets depleted. It’s good to monitor cardio progress (or digress); such as total calories burned per unit of time completed.

    The applied program

    I was very pleased by the results of this 14-day cyclic-ketogenic diet. Total net weight loss averaged 3.4 pounds per two-week rotation – almost 2 pounds of fat lost per week with minimal or no muscle wasting. The results were more drastic than using seven-day rotations. The first half is certainly less comfortable than the second. By the second week, I had a rebound in energy levels and could think clearer.

    Studies have suggested that performance can be maintained while on a low-carbohydrate; my application suggests no performance drop after an initial adjustment period - especially as it relates to cardio performance. I did get the stimulated low-carbohydrate feeling; which is better than the brain-dead feeling I usually get after only two or three days on a low carbohydrate diet. With a seven-day split, I was super compensating glycogen right before ketosis started to become doable.

    I did note some constipation - a likely result of a low carb/fiber diet. I am started taking a colon cleanser but discontinued after adding Optimum Nutrition’s whey protein to my post-workout shake – I don’t know if the company meant it, but it definitely has a laxative affect.

    Subsequent weeks compared training numbers to see if strength/muscle could be preserved while increasing fat loss. I really pushed to increase cardio endurance as well as keep strength numbers out of the red. I originally thought the 14-day CKD might be too much, but it was very productive. Issues associated with over-reaching/training are resolved through the program’s variety and varying workout intensities and durations. Intense training (giant set depletion training) is brief; whereas the lower-intensity tension workouts are a little longer. The program design is good.

    Rotation 1: Jul. 22; 248.0
    Rotation 2: Aug. 5; 242.0
    Rotation 3: Aug. 19; 239.5
    Rotation 4: Sep. 2; 236
    Rotation 5: Sep. 16; 233.8
    Rotation 6: Oct. 14; 227



    During the first rotation, I tested for ketones using urine analysis. I tested positive on Day 2. Urinary PH was low (5), another indicator of ketones. I was negative on Day 6. On Day 7, I was positive again. So, one day was needed to get into ketosis after an evening carb up - probably pushed along by morning training. The second week had a definite positive for ketones.

    With the second rotation, I simply didn’t feel as good as I did with the first one. Going into the third, I felt a bit more pent up and ready. I also became more restrictive with my caloric intake during the depletion phase. I needed to make a diet adjustment, so less nuts.

    I started the third phase accidentally taking more time to complete a routine than usual but I hit the gas and ended up with a lot of improvements. Even cardio numbers were up across the board. I increased some of the loads during the depletion giant sets but I need to keep my times tighter during the next rotation. My glycogen-loaded routines continued to show increases in strength, ever since i began this program. So weight loss could easily be attributed to decreases in fat with increases in muscle. My post-depletion workout drink changed to roughly 40 grams whey protein mixed with half a banana.

    I had a lot of commenting regarding my weight loss in the fourth rotation; especially after depleting down to 220 pounds. I started fitting into some really old clothes - especially pants. I netted a three-pound weight loss this two-week rotation. I also appeared to be adding some additional lean mass; this was the opinion of my wife as well. Performance-wise, I took a few hits here and there but cardio improved at every instance. So endurance went up. The power workout on Day 14 produced the same index as the week before - I finished the same loads in the same amount of time (54 minutes). Once again, my post-depletion workout drink changed to add in glutamine again: roughly 20 grams whey with around 20 grams glutamine, mixed with half a banana.

    I continued to be quite happy with the routine - especially the variety in training. Through the fourth rotation, I was losing an average of 1.8 pounds per week. No appreciable loss in strength with several increases. However, quadriceps strength was dropping while hamstrings stayed strong. Aerobic output kept increasing. Core strength also kept getting better; partially due to less body fat mass.

    For the fifth rotation, my post-depletion workout drink changed to roughly a 50-gram mix of whey, glutamine and creatine; three parts whey, three parts glutamine and one part creatine. Mixed post workout with half of a banana.

    The carbohydrate load during the fifth rotation was astonishing. After almost 15 years of training, this was the most weight I had shifted from diet alone – drug free. I depleted down to a chiseled 216 and then ended a carbohydrate load at 236 – 20 pounds in two days! I felt like I had an alcoholic’s hangover after the carbohydrate load. I was tired and out of breath. This was explained during the evening’s power routine when I jumped on a scale which revealed the 20-pound gain. Honestly, I was thinking about ending this since I depleted to 216 pounds and was starting to get worn out. But after carbohydrate loading up to 236 pounds and having a great power routine, I chose to ride it out for a sixth rotation.

    The day after the major weight gain, I was back to 230 pounds. I seemed to have really peaked, thus performing really well on the power routine. I thought I would show a power loss, especially since I had stripped some weight off the Squat to get a deeper range of motion, but my pulling strength in the Dead Lifts improved and I finished the entire routine much faster than last time. Anyway, performance-wise, cardio improved in the beginning. However, during the second week I started to drag a bit so I increased the duration to keep burning fat. I started doing three-mile power walks in the evening.

    The sixth was a hard rotation. Cardio output took a nose dive and I generally felt pretty exhausted. At the end of the second week’s depletion, I had hit 212 pounds. After the carbohydrate load, the power routine showed a significant drop – strength dropped a little and it took me longer to finish the workout (57 minutes). I was also cramping more often. It started to become clear: I need some rest; it was time to shift gears. Even though I was dragging a bit, I felt ready for something new. After 12 weeks of restrictive dieting while maintaining musculature, I was pent up and ready to move some heavy weights again! So I ended this program and immediately shifted into a mass-building cycle to ride the primed condition for a growth spurt in muscle gains.

    I had blood chemistry checked on Oct. 5; sixth rotation, Day 6. My complete blood count report was good. Red cell size distribution width was a little high (15.3), not sure why. Lymphocytes were also elevated (48), possibly due to an immunization shot I got a week prior.

    Fasting blood glucose (90.07) was good - certainly far from a diabetes concern. Creatinine (1.5) levels were high, placing stress on the kidneys. Uric Acid (5.01) levels were okay. However, I was apparently quite dehydrated since BUN (26.03) was also elevated. Alkaline Phosphatase (56) showed healthy liver values but other liver/muscle enzymes were elevated; such as ALT (62) and AST (74). This is conclusive to the fact that the liver receives extra stress from strength training via injury and the micro trauma to the muscles. This looks like I was in an overtrained and dehydrated state.

    Total cholesterol (237.43) was certainly healthy; LDL (108.28) is low and HDL (120.65) is high. The ratio of LDL to HDL (1.96) was beneficial to strong cardiovascular health. The big winner was blood triglycerides (34.54), which were very low.

    Prostate-specific antigen (.44) and free PSA (.14) looked good for a 29 year-old man. Testosterone (4.88) was at a modest amount; a likely dip due to other signs of overtraining. I will test for comparison after a maintenance diet and routine is used.

    This 14-day CKD allowed me to lose a lot of fat and enter a primed state to effectively switch to a muscle-building program. In the end, I had good blood chemistry but it is obvious my system was stressed. In the future, I plan to focus more on proper hydration. To properly rebound this diet with a bulking cycle, my advice is to steer the final two-week rotation toward less cardio intensity but longer duration. It may also be helpful to use only the tension training routines during the last rotation – to replace the GBC giant sets. Before being able to immediately change to a bulking phase – especially one augmented by anabolic-androgenic steroids – it’s important to allow less accumulated muscle damage and decrease inflammation. Then hit the gas and grow from the primed condition!
    Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

    Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

  • #2
    good upper back detail.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd really like to see some other before and after photos of people doing this before their next bulking cycle... even though, the thought of a restrictive diet with Thanksgiving and Christmas in the midst prolly sounds quite unattractive to most I will add other before-and-after photos to the original post, if provided. Just post your pics to this thread and I'll get them up.

      Also, there is an acceptable rate in which to drop weight for each rotation - the key is to monitor strength levels in your training journal and see how much weight you can drop without losing strength. I found almost two pounds per week was doable up until the sixth phase... that's when I started to lose power.

      The goal here is not to get shredded and peak for a competition - but rather get body fat down and maintain muscle mass... so the muscle/mass-gaining cycle does not back peddle too much. The goal is to get your body more efficient and lean so the cycle can be more rewarding.
      Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

      Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

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      • #4
        Wow, what an amazing write up. I love the idea of pre-cycle priming.

        Warrior, is this something that can also benefit someone who is going to run a 4 week peptide-only cycle alongside a fully recovered HPTA??

        Comment


        • #5
          Somewhat a unrelated question to this thread bro... do you do a colon cleanse before/after cycle?I'm an advocate,but just wanted to see if you do the same, since you usually don't leave any stones unturned.:-)

          ~RR

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RazorRipped View Post
            Somewhat a unrelated question to this thread bro... do you do a colon cleanse before/after cycle?I'm an advocate,but just wanted to see if you do the same, since you usually don't leave any stones unturned.:-)

            ~RR

            Good question RR...... Hey question for you, what type/ brand of cleanse do you use?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by leave1 View Post
              Wow, what an amazing write up. I love the idea of pre-cycle priming.

              Warrior, is this something that can also benefit someone who is going to run a 4 week peptide-only cycle alongside a fully recovered HPTA??
              Priming is something you should do to get your body ready for any growth spurt - wether it be natural or with pharmaceuticals. Ever since puberty, your body has grown in spurts. Priming refers to the measures taken to make sure the spurt is optimal - AAS or not - to ensure a strong anabolic response for maximized growth. Your body will not grow forever, it eventually starts to get beaten down and tired... it's best to rotate periods of fat loss, maintenance, priming and growth - for maximal conditioning and improvements. How you arrange those diet/training approaches (weeks and structures) depends on what you learn about your own limitations and how you augment your efforts (drugs, rest, food, ...)
              Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

              Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RazorRipped View Post
                Somewhat a unrelated question to this thread bro... do you do a colon cleanse before/after cycle?I'm an advocate,but just wanted to see if you do the same, since you usually don't leave any stones unturned.:-)

                ~RR
                I do if I am getting blocked up. You don't want toxins being reabsorbed into the system due to an ineffecient GI tract... it's better to keep things moving. When I am glycogen (carb) depleting I can get blocked up easy... thats when I find some kinda cleanser to get things moving again. While I was polishing the program above, I started mixing heavy amounts of glutamine (good for GI health) and whey protein post workout... the whey was from Optimum Nutrition and it flushed me out pretty good. There was no further need to use a cleanser after I started cutting the glutamine with ON whey... maybe not a desirable effect for most, but it served a good purpose there.

                As far as post cycle, depends on your in-cycle nutritional structure. The cycle I am doing now (Deca/Test), I am eating a shitload of veggies and fruits. This has helped me stay hydrated, develop very little fluid retention and stay quite regular... there is no way I will need a cleanser supplement with all the natural fibers I am taking in. I have to say, this has been one of the most pleasant mass-building cycles I have ever done - I don't feel bloated and clumsy and I have built up my primed bodyweight of 227 to 266, thus far... in less than 8 weeks.
                Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

                Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

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                • #9
                  Although you might be eating right before /after cycle,doesn't mean you don't have a layer of matter on your intestinal tract lining.You'd be surprised at what a true 14 day cleanse(pharmacy kit) will do for you.I'm not talking about getting your tract moving to minimize fecal matter build up,but cleansing the lining of your intestinal tract.I've also have had colonics done pre cycle.I'm just not fond of having a tube shoved up my colon.But you really feel a huge differnce once it's done.From internal energy to external things, like better skin tone ect.


                  ~RR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RazorRipped View Post
                    Although you might be eating right before /after cycle,doesn't mean you don't have a layer of matter on your intestinal tract lining.You'd be surprised at what a true 14 day cleanse(pharmacy kit) will do for you.I'm not talking about getting your tract moving to minimize fecal matter build up,but cleansing the lining of your intestinal tract.I've also have had colonics done pre cycle.I'm just not fond of having a tube shoved up my colon.But you really feel a huge differnce once it's done.From internal energy to external things, like better skin tone ect.


                    ~RR
                    Ive heard you are
                    marcus

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by marcus300 View Post
                      Ive heard you are
                      Only when you are the one inserting the tube.Then I LOVE IT>

                      ~RR

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RazorRipped View Post
                        Although you might be eating right before /after cycle,doesn't mean you don't have a layer of matter on your intestinal tract lining.You'd be surprised at what a true 14 day cleanse(pharmacy kit) will do for you.I'm not talking about getting your tract moving to minimize fecal matter build up,but cleansing the lining of your intestinal tract.I've also have had colonics done pre cycle.I'm just not fond of having a tube shoved up my colon.But you really feel a huge differnce once it's done.From internal energy to external things, like better skin tone ect.


                        ~RR
                        I know that the constant changes in diet can cause a lot of discomfort - I am pretty sure much of it has to do with the regulation of essential enzymes... since reduction can occur when omitting certain foods... such as low carbs and reduction of amylase. The high doses of glutamine PWO during priming helps to protect the lining of the gastrointestinal tract...

                        I can talk to a pharmacist about these kits and give it a shot after my current cycle... and let you know... do these kits address enzyme deficiencies as well as mobilizing waste? That would be ideal IMO...
                        Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

                        Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

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                        • #13
                          Warrior,

                          I assume that you would consider your diet to be optimal for pre-cycle priming, but do you think Dave's diet would be good for pre-cycle priming?
                          "Strongman is an external view of how pissed off I really am at the world."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Warrior View Post
                            I can talk to a pharmacist about these kits and give it a shot after my current cycle... and let you know... do these kits address enzyme deficiencies as well as mobilizing waste? That would be ideal IMO...
                            Yes they do bro.They add alot of enzymes,and also a mild laxative to ensure you have two bowel movements everyday.You'll loose 3-5 pounds of built up waste on your intestinal tract.
                            The kits really cleanse your intestinal lining.Thats' what they are designed to do.After years and years,no matter how good your diet is,you'll get build up on your intestinal walls that will eventually limit nutrient uptake as well as limit the intestines of getting rid of toxic waste.
                            Give it a try.You'll be pleased with the results.A little side note : It takes at least 2 weeks to cleanse your intestinal tract.So don't get one of those 7 day kits as they are useless.I use a 30 day colon cleanse kit.It's about 50 bucks,but worth it.Better than having Marcus shove a tube up my colon while he wears that sexy,black leather Nazi outfit.


                            ~RR

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GameofInches View Post
                              Warrior,

                              I assume that you would consider your diet to be optimal for pre-cycle priming, but do you think Dave's diet would be good for pre-cycle priming?
                              It's up to you to make it optimal. In reality, anyone can shave off one to two pounds of fat every week... but most important: while preserving muscle/strength. After ten weeks, you should have 10-20 pounds less fat and ready to being an AAS-bulking cycle. In the phase above, I dropped 21 pounds in 12 weeks - and thats going from a carb-loaded to carb-loaded body weights - no dehydration or glycogen swinging to skew results. In fact, the last rotation I dipped down to 212 pounds before carb loading up to the final 227.

                              Using the program above, the endurance component of your musculature gets trained quite well - making it easy to graduate to a new level in fitness while setting up for a heavy strength/power training cycle. The diet helps mobilize fats for fuel and create insulin sensitivity... as I wrote above, after 12 weeks my total cholesterol (237.43) was certainly healthy; LDL (108.28) was low and HDL (120.65) is high; the ratio of LDL to HDL (1.96) was beneficial to strong cardiovascular health.... blood triglycerides (34.54), which were rock bottom. My blood chemistry was optimal aside from elevated liver enzymes... which I attributed to my progressive cardio training causing lower body muscle damage that wasn't getting enuogh time to recover... but it's this-for-that, I guess.

                              I don't know much about Dave's diet... but to have an optimal prime, you want to slowly melt off some fat while preserving muscle, build up a desire to lift some heavy ass weights, as well as improve insulin sensitivity and blood chemistry to maximize proper calorie patritioning for muscle growth. This takes a proper integration of diet and training.
                              Ramblings and gear: WarriorFX.com : 500-word winners in 2008

                              Muscular Development Forum Rules :.

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