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Thread: Q&A with Mini Forklift Ⓥ

  1. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrainInsane201 View Post
    Jim, what would be an ideal meal macro-wise before a workout?
    Depends on the individual really.

    What is their BMR?
    What will they be doing in the workout? Duration/intensity?
    What time of the day are they working out and what have they eaten up until that point?

    A very rough guide that you could probably apply to most people would be 45/40/15. My reasoning for the carbs being slightly higher than the protein for Pre WO is that the carbs will be your main energy source; then I would have it the other way round for the Post WO nutrition as you obviously want to be consuming a higher protein content then to fascilitate muscle repair. Hope that makes sense, thanks for the question TI.

  2. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by quattro View Post
    Jim, kinda random but Ive always wanted to ask....

    How tall are you?
    I am a shortass, 5'8.

  3. #122
    Juggernaut TrainInsane201's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mini Forklift Ⓥ View Post
    Depends on the individual really.

    What is their BMR?
    What will they be doing in the workout? Duration/intensity?
    What time of the day are they working out and what have they eaten up until that point?

    A very rough guide that you could probably apply to most people would be 45/40/15. My reasoning for the carbs being slightly higher than the protein for Pre WO is that the carbs will be your main energy source; then I would have it the other way round for the Post WO nutrition as you obviously want to be consuming a higher protein content then to fascilitate muscle repair. Hope that makes sense, thanks for the question TI.
    Ok cool. Thanks Jim.
    Quote Originally Posted by modredtrenton View Post
    someone said 20 pounds of REAL muscle is all you can gain as a natty in you whole life

  4. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan Centopani View Post
    Hey Jim-

    Do you have any feelings/opinions on the use of systemic enzymes like Wobenzym? I used it years ago and felt great...all my aches and pains went away and I slept like the dead. The only thing I noticed at the time was that I felt really flat. Granted, I was following a keto diet at the time and flat wasn't too uncommon, but I felt even flatter than usual!
    Not familiar with the product but from having a look it seems to be a combination of digestive enzymes? Makes perfect sense to me and actually a good thing for a BB'er to be taking seeing how they often tend to eat large meals at regular intervals. Products such as the one you mentioned would have a host of benefits including things like reducing inflammation, bloating and flatulence (common among the BB'ers I have worked with haha), indigestion, food allergies and/or intolerance and pancreatic insufficiency (the inability for the pancreas to secrete enough enzymes into the duodenum).

    Wobenzym would help to allow the breakdown of food in the digestive tract as there are specific enzymes required to break to the food down into their component parts (carbohydrates/proteins/fats) for absorption and utilisation by the body. If your digestive system is working optimally then everything else should be improved as well, possibly why you might have been sleeping better whilst you were taking it.

    Just my 2c, cheers Evan.

  5. #124
    Chief Digital Officer Nate's Avatar
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    You guys are in jim's turf now so step lively!

  6. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mini Forklift Ⓥ View Post
    I am a shortass, 5'8.
    God Jim I really need to diet now. I'm 5'7" and 220lbs. I always thought you were shorter than that.
    413/330/512 1255lbs@220 APF raw

  7. #126
    Juggernaut TrainInsane201's Avatar
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    I'd really like to see one of your write-ups published in MD.
    Quote Originally Posted by modredtrenton View Post
    someone said 20 pounds of REAL muscle is all you can gain as a natty in you whole life

  8. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrainInsane201 View Post
    I'd really like to see one of your write-ups published in MD.
    Thanks buddy, so would I !!

    Guess the bosses of MD would need to feel there is value in what I write and that it would be a column that would be generally well received by the people that buy/read the magazine.

  9. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by youngitalianstallion View Post
    what to you think of carb backloading diet?
    I wouldn't advocate this for everyone ~ and I don't think it would work great for everyone, but I can see how it would work in principle and I don't see too many problems with it. I'd encourage someone to try it out if it appealed to them. There's a great podcast here with some good info about CBL:

    http://www.bulletproofexec.com/podca...h-john-keifer/

    Quote Originally Posted by Landoismyhero View Post
    MF, curious to know your take on supplements, e.g. The creatines, bcaa's, of the industry. I have tried creation, glutamine, and bcaa's, and in my experience the tangible benefits were non-existent. I still drink the kool-aid to a certain extent, but it's largely a placebo effect as far as I am concerned.
    The supplement market IMO tends to over promise and under deliever, has been like this for years. I can however see the benefit of taking creatine for yourself as most of the creatine we get from food is extracted from meat and fish. Be careful of the brand with you being vegan, Jack3d for example contains pork aparrently. However having said that there's many straight creatine monohydrates are fine (SCI-FIT Kre-Alkalyn 1500 is a popular choice for vegans from what I understand); Kre-Alkalyn also has the benefits of high absorption and is a good choice for anyone that gets stomach discomfort from regular or even occasionally micronosed monohydrate.

    Stick with the basics, protein and creatine. If you ever have any issues with your gut then L-Glutamine can be worth throwing into the mix as wel. I've personally never noticed a lot from taking BCAA's and if you are using a good quality protein you should be getting a reasonable amount anyway. If you're not using a protein I can highly recommend this one for you:

    http://myvega.com/

    I'm just working through some packs of each of their different products now...

    538634_10150896245043720_1778058443_n.jpg

    They taste great and nutritionally they are fantastic, I like the added Omega content isn't normally present in your normal whey proteins.

  10. #129
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    Jim,
    Just read this in Science and thought it was pretty intresting. Basically it states that humans haven't evolved to eat the crap diet we currently have. The result is tooth decay and underdeveloped lower jaws. I can't access the entire .pdf from home, but if you like I can send PM it to you tomorrow.

    Science 25 May 2012:
    Vol. 336 no. 6084 pp. 973-975
    DOI: 10.1126/science.336.6084.973

    • News Focus

    Evolutionary BiologyEvolutionary BiologyAn Evolutionary Theory of Dentistry



    Summary

    According to work presented at a recent meeting, human teeth, jaws, and mouths are not adapted in a healthy way to the diet of modern industrial society. We evolved to thrive on coarse seeds, nuts, tubers, fruit, and meat. The mismatch between our adaptations and our environment causes the dental cavities, overcrowding of teeth, overbite, and gum disease that run rampant today. A study of two Maya villages presented at the meeting offers before-and-after images of a population undergoing the so-called nutrition transition in which people switch from a traditional subsistence diet to an Industrial Age diet of refined sugars and processed foods. At the meeting, an unusual mix of paleoanthropologists, archaeologists, dental researchers, and food scientists explored what is known about the diets and dental health of ancient humans, and how that information might be useful to dentists today.

  11. #130
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    I'd really appreciate having the chance to read over that PDF if that's okay? Thanks in advance JIM.

    You saw my reply to your post a page or two back?

  12. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mini Forklift Ⓥ View Post
    I'd really appreciate having the chance to read over that PDF if that's okay? Thanks in advance JIM.

    You saw my reply to your post a page or two back?
    No problem. I'll send it in the morning.

    Yes I saw your reply. Thanks for that. Right now I mostly eat chicken thighs (dark meat) for the very reason that they digest more slowly. I'm cutting fat and eating thighs keeps me full longer. I've tried to eat chicken breasts instead and they just don't control my appetite as well. However, I also eat a lot of vegetables and fruits, so transit time isn't a problem for me. A typical American diet has all the fatty meat and little to no fiber, so you're right on the money there. That kind of diet will get your shit backed up in a hurry.

  13. #132
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    Default SUGAR: POISON FOR OUR CHILDREN

    This clip is well worth watching if you have a spare bit of time. It backs up a lot of my stats that I have posted many times in various other threads and confirms my beliefs/statements that soft drinks and sugar are a major cause of health concerns such as diabetes, fatty liver** and obesity amongst children. Sugar is essentially a neurotoxin which not one single cell in our body requires in order to survive

    http://tvnz.co.nz/sunday-news/ceo-s-...-video-4922363

    I don't know how to embed that video but the link should take you straight to it, it's 16mins in length. Might be an eye opener for some of you. As I have said all along, if we can increase our consumption of natural, non-refined foods (high protein/high fibre) and cut back on on sugar, salt and processed foods we are not only paving the way for significantly better health but we are also optimising our ability to gain quality lean muscle. This article illustrates it quite well:


    NZPA June 23, 2011, 7:40 pm

    The eating habits of Uganda gorillas could provide a clue as to why humans are becoming increasingly obese, according to a recent Massey University scientist's study.

    Nutritional ecologist Professor David Raubenheimer from the Institute of Natural Sciences, studied gorillas in remote Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, who seasonally overate protein to meet their needs for carbohydrates and fats. But the results of the study surprised the researcher because they were opposite to what humans did, which was to overeat carbohydrates and fats to get enough protein.

    In the four months of the year when fruits were freely available, the rare apes ate a diet that provided 19% of energy from protein. The study showed this was close to a balanced diet for gorillas and was similar to the protein requirements of humans. But in the eight months of the year when fruits were scarce in their high-altitude forest habitats, the gorillas ate a diet containing 30% protein.

    “This provided us with a natural experiment in which we could test whether the appetite of mountain gorillas is more tightly linked to protein or non-protein energy [carbohydrates and fats],” Prof Raubenheimer said. “If protein is more important, then gorillas stuck on the high protein diet will eat enough food to satisfy their need for protein, but in the process eat less than the required amount of fats and carbs.” The eating pattern explained a lot about the nutritional biology of our own species, he said.

    “It means that our intake of fats and carbs, and hence the energy is lower when we eat a diet high in protein, which is how high protein weight loss diets work. But there is a flipside, as when we eat a diet low in protein we overeat fats and carbs to satisfy our appetite for protein. This could likely explain the rise over the past few decades in human obesity, he said. “For a number of reasons, including the relatively high price of protein, the protein content of our diets has over the past 50 years become diluted with fats and carbs. Our unrealised craving for protein causes us to overeat the low protein foods in the same way that an alcoholic would drink more low alcohol lager to satisfy his addiction.”

    References:

    Published in the British Journal Biology Letters.

  14. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolsen View Post
    Jim, we've talked before about juicing veges and fruits. What are your favorite recipes, and do you have any for energy, better sleep, endurance, post workout, etc.?
    I'm going to post up a shake every day, otherwise I'm not going to be able to get through all of the questions and keep on top of the thread. The first one is here, Post exercise (recovery):

    http://forums.musculardevelopment.co...=1#post3093346

    #2: Endurance

    Protein powder, milk (or liquid of choice), 1 x tsp coconut oil, 1/2 tsp chia seeds, Acetyl L-Carnitine (empty the contents of 1-2 x capsules) , 1 x banana

    OVERVIEW: Chia seeds have been a staple of the Aztecs for many, many years. Runners of the hidden Tarahumara tribe use it as a fuel, they mix half a teaspoon of Chia with a pinch of brown sugar, mix up in a small glass of water and they're away ~ instant energy. These are people that even the older members of the tribe, often in their 80's can run continuously for a whole day or more through the mountains on very little food:

    "The Tarahumara are literally born to run and from an early age Taramuhara children play running games which continue well into their old age. It is not uncommon for 80 year old Tarahumara to run litterally all day long through rough, mountainous terrain on little more than Pinole (a corn mixture used as a type of superfuel - There are no gels in the Copper Canyon!) Not only are the Tarahumara excellent runners, they are also known for incredible health, long lives, serenity, and their peaceful and reclusive nature."

    It has a positive effect on blood sugar levels, and this is another reason why I included it in an endurance-type shake as blood sugar levels can fluctuate a lot as the duration of the exercise increases. It has been reported (and largely accepted in the world of endurance sports) that your body enters a completely new physiological state every 3 hours of continuous exercise; it's usually around the 6 hour mark (two full changes) that many people start to fall apart both mentally and physically. Chia is also okay and actually beneficial for diabetics to eat.

    It is very rich in Omega content (mainly a-linolenic acid, also known as ALA). Great source of antioxidants and a variety of amino acids. It does swell and form a gel like substance in liquid, absorbing up to 30 times it's own weight so with this shake you really want to mix it up and drink it fairly quickly; this mucilage is effective at cleaning and detoxifying the intestines as well as being a reasonably effective appetite curber. If you buy a good chia then it should be gluten free and shelf stable for years due to it containing Cinnamic acids that help guard the Omega oils from oxidation.

    Acetyl L-Carnitine is favourable over regular L-Carnitine as your body can utilise it a little better due to it being more bioavaliable. A usueful supplement for endurance athletes and BB'ers performing cardio for weight loss, it allows your body to start using fat/fatty acids as an energy source a little sooner than it normally would.

    Coconut oil is a great energy source and heart-healthy despite the 90%+ saturated fat content.

    Bananas are a good source of potassium and magnesium which are two key electrolytes for endurance training. You're looking around 3-5g fibre and 100cals in an average size banana

    (fibre is not your best friend for endurance training)

    Serum electrolyte levels (serum is the fluid part of your blood):

    • Sodium: 3.2 grams/litre
    • Potassium: 0.16 grams/litre
    • Calcium: 0.1 grams/litre
    • Chloride: 3.5 grams/litre

    One litre of sweat typically contains about: 1.15g Sodium, 0.23g Potassium and 1.48g Chloride. These values vary widely among individuals but will be accurate to within about +/- 50%. The actual salt lost will depend upon the sweat rate (litres per hour) and the concentration of salt in the sweat. Ideally you would know these values but it is fairly easy to make a good guess based on knowledge of how much you sweat (little vs. a lot) and how salty your sweat is (not very or very). If you have salt stains on your clothes and your sweat stings your eyes, chances are that you have significant amounts of salt in your sweat. A rate of one litre per hour is not uncommon for well conditioned athlete. At that rate, typical electrolyte loss rates by sweat are ~1g/hr for sodium, and 0.2 g/hr for potassium.

    This is a shake that tastes pretty good but you might need to use a little more liquid than you would normally use otherwise it may be a little thick for some. Apologies for the long post, has probably taken me about 20 or 25mins to type all of this up so there may be the odd spelling mistake haha. Cheers

  15. #134
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    ^^
    Great write-up
    Quote Originally Posted by modredtrenton View Post
    someone said 20 pounds of REAL muscle is all you can gain as a natty in you whole life

  16. #135
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    Thanks !! A couple of shots I came across which I thought were quite cool...

    532785_10151187834034867_250190185_n.jpg 547427_10151127149934867_136482514866_13349728_1107742868_n.jpg

  17. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by ;Yesterday, 04:18 PM3095108
    hi jim, i see that you often add some greens into your protein shake cos i noticed this on your training diary. which ones do you like and what are the best ones do you think. thanks
    Chlorella, Spirulina and Barley Grass would probably be my top 3.

    Chlorella is great at detoxing the blood. The detoxification capabilities of this 'powder that can turn your poo green' is due to its' incredibly high content of chlorophyll and its 'cracked' cell walls; they have the ability to grab onto unwanted materials, pollutants and some heavy metal residues in the bowel and intestines and help to flush them from the body. It's abundant in RNA & DNA nucleic acids, so I could also see how it could potentially repair DNA that has been damaged. Full of natural ionic minerals and the many enzymes present such as cytochrome oxidase, lipase, protease and amylase it can help support good healthy digestive function and intestinal flora.

    Alkaline balance in the body is extremely important to our health; the ideal balance of food and food residue in the body is 80% alkaline and 20% acidic. This is largely determined by the food we eat, as foods are either acid forming or alkaline forming. We are constantly in a changing state between acid and alkaline and is continually working to maintain an ideal pH level of between 7.3 and 7.4. Babies are born in a very alkaline state and as we age most people tend to gradually become more and more acidic (largely a result of dietary choices). Having said that, the body is able to regain its natural alkaline balance by eating highly alkaline foods such as green leafy vegetables, fresh seasonal fruits, pulses and nutrient-rich super foods like barley/wheat grass, spirulina etc etc. The key is simply changing the balance of the foods you eat, the overall amount of food consumed and getting to know which foods are acid forming and which are alkaline forming.


    Spirulina has one of the richest concentration of nutrients of any plant, herb or grain. It's also a complete protein, containing all essential amino acids. The protein in spirulina is superior to all standard plant proteins. Blue green algae was one of the first organisms on the planet and it's fatty acid content closely mirrors the human brain. Some other points to note:

    ** Spirulina contains high levels of carotenes (including beta carotene) and xanthophylls (including zeaxanthin and cryptoxanthin). Carotenoids play an important role in humans by acting as biological antioxidants, protecting cells and tissues from the effects of free radicals
    ** Contains a plant protein called phycocyanin. This powerful blue protein pigmentfound only in spirulina forms soluble complexes with iron and other minerals to increase their bioavailability in the body. Phycocyanin is about 15% of the entire weight of spirulina and is thought to have developed around a billion years before chlorophyll. Phycocyanin has antioxidant activity and is a valuable immune supporting pigment
    ** It's an excellent source of iron and the reason why the iron in spirulina is so bioavailable is because the iron forms soluble complexes with Phycocyanin. This iron-phycocyanin complex allows easier absorption by the body. Iron and Vitamin B12 levels are dependant on one another, so if the diet is good then they this isn't something that you need to be overly concerned about
    ** Rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an important Omega 6 fatty acid commonly found in flaxseed and Evening Primrose oil

    Also has use for athletes and BB'ers due to spirulina's relationship with glycogen; the body’s principal source of both immediate and long term energy is glycogen which is stored in the muscles and liver and not ordinarily available directly through our diet. Glycogen forms an energy reserve that can be quickly mobilized to meet a sudden need for glucose (a fasted athlete training in the morning has enough glycogen supplies to fuel a 3hr workout). Spirulina is the only plant source of glycogen available (that I am aware of), and basically the more glycogen that's available during intense/sustained exercise then you should be optimising muscular functioning. You can use spirulina before training to concentrate the nutrients in the blood, making them available to the muscles when and where they are needed most.

    Daily RDI of iron for men is not much at all, varies from country to country but it usually falls somewhere between 3-10g.

    Easiest way to buy it is probably as a powder so you can just throw a teaspoon into your protein shake, mixes fine. Assuming that most of the big well known health stores in the States would sell it ~ and buy organic if you can. Usually that means it hasn't been fed Chilean nitrate (which is a natural fertiliser), not a big deal at all but I tend to think that organic products in general are a higher quality and often a slightly higher purity (see photo below) !!

    551737_451527928191655_188162569_n.jpg

    Barley Grass is something that can be used as an 'everyday' addition to your diet, and IMO more so than Chlorella which tends to be a little more specific in terms of how and when you should use it. I tend to like to use a combo of wheat & barley grass and just mix a teaspoon into my protein shake every day. Tastes surprisingly good so let me know what you think. Cheers MF.
    Last edited by Mini Forklift Ⓥ; June 14th, 2012 at 06:33 AM.

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