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Thread: Why Mentzer Matters: The Unique Legacy of a Bodybuilding Original

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    Administrator Nate's Avatar
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    Default Why Mentzer Matters: The Unique Legacy of a Bodybuilding Original


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    good stuff.. M&F was were I was introduced to "Heavy Duty" training back in '82

    Dorian Yates approved.
    IFBB PRO- ​Darkwire.. from ICELAND..lmaooo

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    Freak of Nature Lorenzo Marinčić's Avatar
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    Peter for prez!!! Great article, this man is not respected enough, he truly chamgesd the game if you think about it...IMO there wouldn't be no meadows, HIT, MTuT or anything where you put a little thought in...we would just pump volume 4 hours a day...he is also the first man to recognize the importance of rest..

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    One of my earliest heroes and mentors.

    I remember at age 15 standing in the electronics section at Sears watching Mike Mentzer win the '78 Mr Universe on one of the multiple TVs tuned in that day.

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    Peter - where could one get access to Menzers articles that you are referring to?

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    Quote Originally Posted by habo View Post
    Peter - where could one get access to Menzers articles that you are referring to?
    Habo, starting back in the late '70s he started writing articles (sometimes 2 or 3 an issue) for MUSCLE/BUILDER POWER which eventually became Muscle & Fitness with FLEX being a hybrid. So then he wrote for Muscle & Fitness and FLEX. In 1995 he started writing for Muscular Development and before his 2001 death he had been writing for Ironman for a few years. He must have written hundreds of articles over they years. Maybe a google search using those magazine titles and his name will unearth some. Or check out what is available (his books are there) on his website mikementzer.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lorenzo Marinčić View Post
    he is also the first man to recognize the importance of rest..
    A major contribution.

    "Enough time has elapsed to allow me to look back and giggle at the exertions I went through in my obsession of wanting to be compared with others – of the need to be the best built man in the world. I now see myself, as I think we all should, as an individual."

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    Great article. More than anything, I was shappy to see Mike being spoken of in a positive light. It was alos nice to see the different aspects of his personality highlighted, rather than portraying him as the one-dimensional asshole that so many others have done over the years. His contribitions to the sport make him worthy of at least that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lorenzo Marinčić View Post
    Peter for prez!!! Great article, this man is not respected enough, he truly chamgesd the game if you think about it...IMO there wouldn't be no meadows, HIT, MTuT or anything where you put a little thought in...we would just pump volume 4 hours a day...he is also the first man to recognize the importance of rest..
    See bold above: Actually, many current day BB'rs don't know this, but he was definitely not the first. Prior to the advent of steroids...and before Weider's influence over the sport began to take hold, many BB'rs trained with a lower volume, lower frequency training split, as they understood the need for recovery. It wasn't until Joe Weider began promoting super high volume, high frequency training in his magazines that rest & recupration took a back seat. Had it not been for the proliferation of AAS around that time, I seriously doubt that this type of training would have become as popular as it did, simply because it is NOT possible for most drug-free lifters to make optimal gains using that style of training. However, being the powerfull drugs they are, steroids allowed BB'rs to continue getting even bigger, despite the negative effect on recovery that high volume, high frequency training has. Joe Weider did a LOT to advance the sport, but he was largely responsible for putting BB'ing science back about 30-40 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    See bold above: Actually, many current day BB'rs don't know this, but he was definitely not the first. Prior to the advent of steroids...and before Weider's influence over the sport began to take hold, many BB'rs trained with a lower volume, lower frequency training split, as they understood the need for recovery. It wasn't until Joe Weider began promoting super high volume, high frequency training in his magazines that rest & recupration took a back seat. Had it not been for the proliferation of AAS around that time, I seriously doubt that this type of training would have become as popular as it did, simply because it is NOT possible for most drug-free lifters to make optimal gains using that style of training. However, being the powerfull drugs they are, steroids allowed BB'rs to continue getting even bigger, despite the negative effect on recovery that high volume, high frequency training has. Joe Weider did a LOT to advance the sport, but he was largely responsible for putting BB'ing science back about 30-40 years.
    Well said, Mike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    See bold above: Actually, many current day BB'rs don't know this, but he was definitely not the first. Prior to the advent of steroids...and before Weider's influence over the sport began to take hold, many BB'rs trained with a lower volume, lower frequency training split, as they understood the need for recovery. It wasn't until Joe Weider began promoting super high volume, high frequency training in his magazines that rest & recupration took a back seat. Had it not been for the proliferation of AAS around that time, I seriously doubt that this type of training would have become as popular as it did, simply because it is NOT possible for most drug-free lifters to make optimal gains using that style of training. However, being the powerfull drugs they are, steroids allowed BB'rs to continue getting even bigger, despite the negative effect on recovery that high volume, high frequency training has. Joe Weider did a LOT to advance the sport, but he was largely responsible for putting BB'ing science back about 30-40 years.
    Thanks for the article Peter.

    I always enjoyed reading Mentzer articles, and the John Little excerpts from his books in Iron Man. His analogies regarding training frequency and recovery were brutally simple, and Dorian used similar analogies in his own Blood and Guts book, which I did read. The lessons derived from such intellectual reasoning are indeed valuable, the logic hard to deny, yet in my own experience, building muscle is a much more dynamic process than striking a stick of dynamite with a hammer, or not continuing to hit a nail after it's already sunk into a board.

    I switched from an HIT/Blood and Guts style to a higher volume style and experienced the best gains I've had in years. To this day, I train volume that incorporates super high-rep sets, (Flex Lewis's 100 rep sets for tri's are my favorite),and that has helped me gain size better than any other method. Seems to me, (and I'm no scientist), that bodybuilders not on drugs would need MORE work to stimulate growth, not less. At least, that has been my experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    Thanks for the article Peter.

    I always enjoyed reading Mentzer articles, and the John Little excerpts from his books in Iron Man. His analogies regarding training frequency and recovery were brutally simple, and Dorian used similar analogies in his own Blood and Guts book, which I did read. The lessons derived from such intellectual reasoning are indeed valuable, the logic hard to deny, yet in my own experience, building muscle is a much more dynamic process than striking a stick of dynamite with a hammer, or not continuing to hit a nail after it's already sunk into a board.

    I switched from an HIT/Blood and Guts style to a higher volume style and experienced the best gains I've had in years. To this day, I train volume that incorporates super high-rep sets, (Flex Lewis's 100 rep sets for tri's are my favorite),and that has helped me gain size better than any other method. Seems to me, (and I'm no scientist), that bodybuilders not on drugs would need MORE work to stimulate growth, not less. At least, that has been my experience.
    On the money post, and great line there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    building muscle is a much more dynamic process than striking a stick of dynamite with a hammer, or not continuing to hit a nail after it's already sunk into a board.
    Agree, the concept of Mike was a scientific reductionism.

    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    Seems to me, (and I'm no scientist), that bodybuilders not on drugs would need MORE work to stimulate growth, not less. At least, that has been my experience.
    Bodybuilders drugs can train harder and more often.

    Drug-free bodybuilders must find its volume, frequency and intensity which allows to make better profits. Genetics, diet and other aspects, determine if the train is assimilated more Weider rules or Mentzer rules.

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    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    I switched from an HIT/Blood and Guts style to a higher volume style and experienced the best gains I've had in years. To this day, I train volume that incorporates super high-rep sets, (Flex Lewis's 100 rep sets for tri's are my favorite),and that has helped me gain size better than any other method. Seems to me, (and I'm no scientist), that bodybuilders not on drugs would need MORE work to stimulate growth, not less. At least, that has been my experience.
    Care to post a sample workout, HPD?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beti ona View Post
    Agree, the concept of Mike was a scientific reductionism.



    Bodybuilders drugs can train harder and more often.

    Drug-free bodybuilders must find its volume, frequency and intensity which allows to make better profits. Genetics, diet and other aspects, determine if the train is assimilated more Weider rules or Mentzer rules.
    I had the exact opposite experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Arnold View Post
    See bold above: Actually, many current day BB'rs don't know this, but he was definitely not the first. Prior to the advent of steroids...and before Weider's influence over the sport began to take hold, many BB'rs trained with a lower volume, lower frequency training split, as they understood the need for recovery. It wasn't until Joe Weider began promoting super high volume, high frequency training in his magazines that rest & recupration took a back seat. Had it not been for the proliferation of AAS around that time, I seriously doubt that this type of training would have become as popular as it did, simply because it is NOT possible for most drug-free lifters to make optimal gains using that style of training. However, being the powerfull drugs they are, steroids allowed BB'rs to continue getting even bigger, despite the negative effect on recovery that high volume, high frequency training has. Joe Weider did a LOT to advance the sport, but he was largely responsible for putting BB'ing science back about 30-40 years.
    This is so true. I'm natural and do two weight sessions a week as well as cardio/other sports. Only about 50 minutes each but always focused on compound movements, like bench press, squats, deadlifts and rows. It's a fine line between stimulating muscle growth and overtraining. For most naturals, high volume training doesn't work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggerfrogger View Post
    I had the exact opposite experience.
    Tell me more, what do you mean?

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