Muscular Development Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 22

Thread: New Study - Coconut Oil is Bad for Your Heart

  1. #1
    Administrator Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    noisserped
    Posts
    17,768
    Gender
    Male

    Default New Study - Coconut Oil is Bad for Your Heart


  2. #2
    Mass Monster IRON DWARF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Joizy
    Posts
    5,499
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Who funded that bullshit study, big pharma?

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    You had to be there
    Posts
    10,484
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Not this shit again. This has been talked in social media for over two weeks now.

  4. #4
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sponsored Bodybuilding Athlete
    Posts
    20,136
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Apprently the problem with it, is that it boosts LDL.







  5. #5

    Default

    Lmfao there are populations in the South Pacific who eat more coconut oil than anyone else in the world and their incidence for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke are among the lowest globally.

    This is study is complete and utter hogwash.

  6. #6
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sponsored Bodybuilding Athlete
    Posts
    20,136
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Do you guys that are posting against this study consume Coconut oil?

  7. #7
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sponsored Bodybuilding Athlete
    Posts
    20,136
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    Lmfao there are populations in the South Pacific who eat more coconut oil than anyone else in the world and their incidence for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke are among the lowest globally.

    This is study is complete and utter hogwash.

    http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/7/10-010710/en/

    Pacific islanders pay heavy price for abandoning traditional diet

    Life expectancy data make clear the urgent need for action. The average age at which people develop diabetes and cardiovascular disease is getting lower. In Fiji, only 16% of the population is aged more than 55 years due to premature deaths primarily caused by noncommunicable diseases, says Waqanivalu

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daibhí O'Buadain View Post
    http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/7/10-010710/en/

    Pacific islanders pay heavy price for abandoning traditional diet

    Life expectancy data make clear the urgent need for action. The average age at which people develop diabetes and cardiovascular disease is getting lower. In Fiji, only 16% of the population is aged more than 55 years due to premature deaths primarily caused by noncommunicable diseases, says Waqanivalu
    I don't understand. Are you disagreeing with me??? Because what you just posted proves my point. The traditional diet there is compromised of ALOT of saturated fat from coconut oil, this shows that deviation from that is making people develop a plethora of health conditions.

  9. #9
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sponsored Bodybuilding Athlete
    Posts
    20,136
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    I don't understand. Are you disagreeing with me??? Because what you just posted proves my point. The traditional diet there is compromised of ALOT of saturated fat from coconut oil, this shows that deviation from that is making people develop a plethora of health conditions.
    Where in this article does it state that eating large quantities daily of Coconut oil saturated fats are a part of a traditional diet?
    This article states that oils are used sparingly.

    They cook meals in Coconut Milk.
    How much saturated fat from Coconut milk are they consuming daily?

    http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ome-Po...s-Diet-of.html


    Traditional Cooking Methods and Food Habits

    The traditional Pacific Islander diets are superior to Western diets in many ways. The weaknesses of the traditional Pacific Island diets are minimal and the strengths are immense. Traditional foods are nutrient-dense, meals are prepared in healthful ways, and oils are used sparingly. The high-fiber, lowfat nature of these diets reduces the risk for heart disease, hypertension, stroke , diabetes, obesity, and certain types of cancer .

    Starchy foods are the foundation of the traditional diet. For example, the traditional Hawaiian diet is 75 to 80 percent starch, 7 to 12 percent fat, and 12 to 15 percent protein . Starch in the diet comes primarily from root vegetables and starchy fruits, such as taro, cassava, yam, green bananas, and breadfruit. In addition, the traditional diet is plentiful in fresh fruits, juices, nuts, and the cooked greens of the starch vegetables (e.g., taro, yam). Traditional meals include poi (boiled taro), breadfruit, green bananas, fish, or pork. Poi is usually given to babies as an alternative to cereal. Many dishes are cooked in coconut milk, and more than forty varieties of seaweed are eaten, either as a vegetable or a condiment. Local markets with fresh foods are still abundant in most islands.

    As expected, fish and other seafood are abundant in the Pacific Islands and are eaten almost every day in some islands. Most fish and seafood are stewed and roasted, but some are served marinated and uncooked. Pork is the most common meat, and it is used in many ceremonial feasts. Whole pigs are often cooked in pits layered with coals and hot rocks. Throughout the Pacific Islands, pit-roasted foods are used to commemorate special occasions and religious celebrations. The part of the pig one receives depends on one's social standing.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    Lmfao there are populations in the South Pacific who eat more coconut oil than anyone else in the world and their incidence for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke are among the lowest globally.

    This is study is complete and utter hogwash.
    Exactly.. Stable saturated fats from coconuts or healthy ruminant animals are the healthiest along with monounsaturated fats from things like avocados, macadamia nuts or olives. On other hand "heart healthy" pro oxidative, pro inflammatory PUFA vegetable oils full of omega 6 like canola, corn, soy, sunflower are by far the worst.. These oils are the main contributor for health issues in western world. Along with other disgusting shit like corn syrup and bunch of different chemicals..

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daibhí O'Buadain View Post
    Where in this article does it state that eating large quantities daily of Coconut oil saturated fats are a part of a traditional diet?
    This article states that oils are used sparingly.

    They cook meals in Coconut Milk.
    How much saturated fat from Coconut milk are they consuming daily?

    http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ome-Po...s-Diet-of.html


    Traditional Cooking Methods and Food Habits

    The traditional Pacific Islander diets are superior to Western diets in many ways. The weaknesses of the traditional Pacific Island diets are minimal and the strengths are immense. Traditional foods are nutrient-dense, meals are prepared in healthful ways, and oils are used sparingly. The high-fiber, lowfat nature of these diets reduces the risk for heart disease, hypertension, stroke , diabetes, obesity, and certain types of cancer .

    Starchy foods are the foundation of the traditional diet. For example, the traditional Hawaiian diet is 75 to 80 percent starch, 7 to 12 percent fat, and 12 to 15 percent protein . Starch in the diet comes primarily from root vegetables and starchy fruits, such as taro, cassava, yam, green bananas, and breadfruit. In addition, the traditional diet is plentiful in fresh fruits, juices, nuts, and the cooked greens of the starch vegetables (e.g., taro, yam). Traditional meals include poi (boiled taro), breadfruit, green bananas, fish, or pork. Poi is usually given to babies as an alternative to cereal. Many dishes are cooked in coconut milk, and more than forty varieties of seaweed are eaten, either as a vegetable or a condiment. Local markets with fresh foods are still abundant in most islands.

    As expected, fish and other seafood are abundant in the Pacific Islands and are eaten almost every day in some islands. Most fish and seafood are stewed and roasted, but some are served marinated and uncooked. Pork is the most common meat, and it is used in many ceremonial feasts. Whole pigs are often cooked in pits layered with coals and hot rocks. Throughout the Pacific Islands, pit-roasted foods are used to commemorate special occasions and religious celebrations. The part of the pig one receives depends on one's social standing.

    Two populations of Polynesians living on atolls near the equator provide an opportunity to investigate the relative effects of saturated fat and dietary cholesterol in determining serum cholesterol levels. The habitual diets of the toll dwellers from both Pukapuka and Tokelau are high in saturated fat but low in dietary cholesterol and sucrose. Coconut is the chief source of energy for both groups. Tokelauans obtain a much higher percentage of energy from coconut than the Pukapukans, 63% compared with 34%, so their intake of saturated fat is higher. The serum cholesterol levels are 35 to 40 mg higher in Tokelauans than in Pukapukans. These major differences in serum cholesterol levels are considered to be due to the higher saturated fat intake of the Tokelauans. Analysis of a variety of food samples, and human fat biopsies show a high lauric (12:0) and myristic (14:0) content. Vascular disease is uncommon in both populations and there is no evidence of the high saturated fat intake having a harmful effect in these populations.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    Two populations of Polynesians living on atolls near the equator provide an opportunity to investigate the relative effects of saturated fat and dietary cholesterol in determining serum cholesterol levels. The habitual diets of the toll dwellers from both Pukapuka and Tokelau are high in saturated fat but low in dietary cholesterol and sucrose. Coconut is the chief source of energy for both groups. Tokelauans obtain a much higher percentage of energy from coconut than the Pukapukans, 63% compared with 34%, so their intake of saturated fat is higher. The serum cholesterol levels are 35 to 40 mg higher in Tokelauans than in Pukapukans. These major differences in serum cholesterol levels are considered to be due to the higher saturated fat intake of the Tokelauans. Analysis of a variety of food samples, and human fat biopsies show a high lauric (12:0) and myristic (14:0) content. Vascular disease is uncommon in both populations and there is no evidence of the high saturated fat intake having a harmful effect in these populations.
    The point is although these populations have a higher than normal serum cholesterol it doesn't seem to correlate to a higher incidence of heart disease, ESPECIALLY compared to U.S. population.

  13. #13
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sponsored Bodybuilding Athlete
    Posts
    20,136
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    I don't understand. Are you disagreeing with me??? Because what you just posted proves my point. The traditional diet there is compromised of ALOT of saturated fat from coconut oil, this shows that deviation from that is making people develop a plethora of health conditions.
    I am not disagreeing with you.
    I am stating that during this study they found that Coconut oil raises Cholesterol levels, which is why they recommend people avoid it.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daibhí O'Buadain View Post
    I am not disagreeing with you.
    I am stating that during this study they found that Coconut oil raises Cholesterol levels, which is why they recommend people avoid it.
    I just don't buy it. There is even research out there that suggests coconut oil helps to convert LDL to HDL. Couple this with the fact that those groups of Pacific Islanders have been eating tons of the stuff for generations and experiencing very low rates of heart diseases and I believe the article/study is off base.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwill22 View Post
    The point is although these populations have a higher than normal serum cholesterol it doesn't seem to correlate to a higher incidence of heart disease, ESPECIALLY compared to U.S. population.
    Cholesterol is antioxidant and building block for cells, nerves, hormones. When arteries are damaged due to any reason - inflammation, oxidative stress etc. Cholesterol is there to maintain structure. But that does not mean that cholesterol itself is the culprit .. Good comparison is firefighters are always where fire is. But that does not mean that firefighters are making fire ..Same with diabetes. Just because you have hyperglycemia, that does not mean that glucose itself is the problem.. It is just ridiculous.. Convetional medicine has everything backwards as usual..

  16. #16
    Iron Addict
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NORFLA
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    I use it to cook all the time, for years. I get blood work done every 3-6 months. All levels are just fine.
    There's nothing I'm afraid of like scared people.
    - Robert Frost

  17. #17
    Mass Monster IRON DWARF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Joizy
    Posts
    5,499
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    I've used it daily, for cooking, mixed in shakes, and right off the spoon. My levels are always good.

    Consider the source of the study... The American Heart Association. Still pushing out-dated cholesterol data. They're in bed with big pharma, who make billions per year pushing statins and similar useless drugs against cholesterol.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •