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Thread: Poop Doping: Does Fecal Transplant Improve Performance?

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    Administrator Nate's Avatar
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    Default Poop Doping: Does Fecal Transplant Improve Performance?


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    What the actual fuck?

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    That's a pretty shitty way of doping.

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    Disgusting

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    Apparently, as far as popularity, that method of doping rank as number 2.

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    Iron Addict Womanthrower's Avatar
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    How the fuck does one poop dope.
    In the sea of heavy metal, you are plankton.

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    Calling it doping is a fake news, but it's a genuine medical practice. Usually they take a partners tested poop, strain it and transfer it into gi tract

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    Barbarian Aliwen's Avatar
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    Along the same path:
    http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/it-takes-guts

    Dude did a fecal transplant on himself using a turkey baster...no homo

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    Fecal transplant has been shown to be very successful in patients with severe C dificile afflictions.

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    I was on antibiotics for a long time due to Chronic Lyme Disease and pretty much killed all the bacteria in my gut. Was actually using a probiotic at the time and it still didn't help. I had to get a fecal transplant. Don't know if it made a big difference with my performance but once I got a few tests done and found out I had pretty much zero good bacteria in my gut, it was the next logical step.

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    Barbarian AChappell's Avatar
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    I spent four years working and researching the colonic gut microbiome for the purpose of obtaining my PHD, as Sean Maloney points out they have been used in C. diff infections as a measure of least resort. However, they are not routinely used, nor has the method for their use been adequately defined within the medical community. This has lead to a number of issues surrounding the efficacy of the treatment. The future however is unlikely to be faceal microbial transplants but rather predefined microbial mixes containing a range of prominent bacteria (probably between 15 to 20 initially) that populate the colon of the healthy individual. A former colleague of mine was working on such mixes. This article however is largely nonsense. "Poop doping" for athletic performance is not a thing. It's purpose as I've mentioned already is to treat infectious disease. The research on athletic performance and the microbiome is non existent, because trying to separate the effect of the athletes diet is close to impossible. Ergo athletes eat better diets than non athletes, hence you have a different Microbiome. Furthermore the closing lines of this article are also nonsense, transplants are unlikely to be useful as a treatment for obesity or weight loss. I suspect what's happened here is who ever wrote this article has read the article published in the scientist, which itself has probably been taking out of context and just paraphrased the thing without any understanding of the field at all.
    PhD Human Nutrition

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    Quote Originally Posted by AChappell View Post
    I spent four years working and researching the colonic gut microbiome for the purpose of obtaining my PHD, as Sean Maloney points out they have been used in C. diff infections as a measure of least resort. However, they are not routinely used, nor has the method for their use been adequately defined within the medical community. This has lead to a number of issues surrounding the efficacy of the treatment. The future however is unlikely to be faceal microbial transplants but rather predefined microbial mixes containing a range of prominent bacteria (probably between 15 to 20 initially) that populate the colon of the healthy individual. A former colleague of mine was working on such mixes. This article however is largely nonsense. "Poop doping" for athletic performance is not a thing. It's purpose as I've mentioned already is to treat infectious disease. The research on athletic performance and the microbiome is non existent, because trying to separate the effect of the athletes diet is close to impossible. Ergo athletes eat better diets than non athletes, hence you have a different Microbiome. Furthermore the closing lines of this article are also nonsense, transplants are unlikely to be useful as a treatment for obesity or weight loss. I suspect what's happened here is who ever wrote this article has read the article published in the scientist, which itself has probably been taking out of context and just paraphrased the thing without any understanding of the field at all.
    Hi, thanks for your response. I'd just like to point out to you that not once did we say that fecal transplant will improve performance. We asked the question of whether it could. There is a difference. Also you're right, there is no evidence either way to support that fecal transplant does support performance. But studying the gut microbiome could lead to a greater understanding of disease, weight-loss and optimal health. Until there's peer reviewed literature it is irresponsible to recommend poop-doping for improving exercise performance. For further reference material on weight-loss and gut microbiota check out this study in Obesity Reviews http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...obr.12541/full 19 May 2017.
    Steve Blechman, Publisher/Editor-in-Chief
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    Online Editor Ron Harris's Avatar
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    As for C-diff, I went through 4 weeks of sheer hell dealing with it this past December. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. I needed 2 different courses of very harsh antibiotics to get rid of it.
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