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Thread: Supplementation

  1. #1
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Supplementation

    This thread will be for Supplementation related information.

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    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Animal Meal

    I would like to start this supplement thread off with a review of what is quickly becoming my favorite supplement.
    Animal Meal.
    I have been using Animal Meal for a month as a meal replacement supplement during my contest prep and I could not be more pleased with this supplement.

    Animal Meal is a whole foods based formula that contains no artificial flavors, colors or sweeteners.

    Each full serving,122 grams, of Animal Meal contains 46 grams of Protein, 48 grams of carbs and 14 grams of fat.

    The protein consists of a pea (primary), beef and egg mix.
    The carbs consist of a mix of sweet potato, pea starch, tapioca, and oats.

    The taste is a earthy granular flavor. due to the primary protein pea source.
    The taste is far better than most food based supplements I have tried.

    All told, Animal has done an excellent job of putting together a perfect meal replacement supplement for bodybuilders.

    I highly recommend it.

    More here: https://www.animalpak.com/animalmeal/animal-meal


    Last edited by Daibhí O'Buadain; August 16th, 2018 at 10:03 PM.

  3. #3
    Online Editor Ron Harris's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks, Daibhi. I knew Evan would never put his name on anything that was not grade A.
    Muscular Development Online Editor
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  4. #4
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Multi-ingredient pre-workout supplements, safety implications, and performance outcomes

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6083567/

    Patrick S. Harty,#1 Hannah A. Zabriskie,#1 Jacob L. Erickson,2 Paul E. Molling,2 Chad M. Kerksick,1 and Andrew R. Jagim1,2

    Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ► Disclaimer

    Abstract

    In recent years, a new class of dietary supplements called multi-ingredient pre-workout supplements (MIPS) has increased in popularity. These supplements are intended to be taken prior to exercise and typically contain a blend of ingredients such as caffeine, creatine, beta-alanine, amino acids, and nitric oxide agents, the combination of which may elicit a synergistic effect on acute exercise performance and subsequent training adaptations compared to single ingredients alone. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to review the theoretical rationale and available scientific evidence assessing the potential ergogenic value of acute and chronic ingestion of MIPS, to address potential safety concerns surrounding MIPS supplementation, and to highlight potential areas for future research. Though direct comparisons between formulations of MIPS or between a MIPS and a single ingredient are challenging and often impossible due to the widespread use of “proprietary blends” that do not disclose specific amounts of ingredients in a given formulation, a substantial body of evidence suggests that the acute pre-exercise consumption of MIPS may positively influence muscular endurance and subjective mood, though mixed results have been reported regarding the acute effect of MIPS on force and power production. The chronic consumption of MIPS in conjunction with a periodized resistance training program appears to augment beneficial changes in body composition through increased lean mass accretion. However, the impact of long-term MIPS supplementation on force production, muscular endurance, aerobic performance, and subjective measures is less clear. MIPS ingestion appears to be relatively safe, though most studies that have assessed the safety of MIPS are relatively short (less than eight weeks) and thus more information is needed regarding the safety of long-term supplementation. As with any dietary supplement, the use of MIPS carries implications for the athlete, as many formulations may intentionally contain banned substances as ingredients or unintentionally as contaminants. We suggest that athletes thoroughly investigate the ingredients present in a given MIPS prior to consumption. In conclusion, it appears that multi-ingredient pre-workout supplements have promise as an ergogenic aid for active individuals, though further information is required regarding long-term efficacy and safety in a wider variety of populations.

  5. #5
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Jerry Brainum on Creatine and Muscle


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    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Psyllium

    Psyllium
    By Daibhi O' Buadain

    During my contest prep diet I started having constipation and gas issues related to my high protein, low carb diet. Even though I am drinking at least gallon of water a day and eating around 40 grams of fiber a day I still developed constipation, as well gas.

    As to supplement use, I am using a whey protein supplement post workout as well as Animal Meal for one meal replacement.

    I started looking for a solution to the problem.
    I ruled out the supplements being a cause of the problem because I have never had constipation and gas from taking a whey protein supplement.
    I am not lactose intolerant.

    In addition, Animal Meal contains 4 grams of fiber which is combined with the 40 grams of fiber a day I get from my diet.
    That should reduce the risk of constipation from taking that supplement.

    During a discussion with my wife aka. the 'Herbal Healer', she suggested that taking two capsules of Psyllium with my meals three times a day might be just the trick to solve the problem.

    Psyllium is a soluble fiber, that passes through the digestive system without being totally broken down or absorbed. Related to my constipation issue, it's benefits are that it absorbs water, increases stool size and thus benefits reducing constipation, It also has a weight loss benefit which I thought would help me cut to the weight target of my prep.

    It is the active ingredient in Metamucil.

    I decided instead of using Metamucil, to buy some soft gel capsules, fill them with Psyllium and start out by take two capsules three times a day with meals.

    The results were that my constipation and gas resolved and I have no more issues.

    Reference: My wife, aka 'The Herbal Healer'.
    Last edited by Daibhí O'Buadain; August 21st, 2018 at 10:06 AM.

  7. #7
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Hyaluronan Synthesis and Myogenesis

    This article is related to certain bodybuilding 'supplements' that contain Hyaluronic acid aka. Hyaluronan.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3642344/


    Liam C. Hunt, Chris Gorman,§ Christopher Kintakas, Daniel R. McCulloch, Eleanor J. Mackie,§ and Jason D. White§,1

    Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ► Disclaimer

    Abstract

    Exogenous hyaluronan is known to alter muscle precursor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, ultimately inhibiting myogenesis in vitro. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of endogenous hyaluronan synthesis during myogenesis. In quantitative PCR studies, the genes responsible for synthesizing hyaluronan were found to be differentially regulated during muscle growth, repair, and pathology. Although all Has genes (Has1, Has2, and Has3) were differentially regulated in these models, only Has2 gene expression consistently associated with myogenic differentiation. During myogenic differentiation in vitro, Has2 was the most highly expressed of the synthases and increased after induction of differentiation. To test whether this association between Has2 expression and myogenesis relates to a role for Has2 in myoblast differentiation and fusion, C2C12 myoblasts were depleted of Has2 by siRNA and induced to differentiate. Depletion of Has2 inhibited differentiation and caused a loss of cell-associated hyaluronan and the hyaluronan-dependent pericellular matrix. The inhibition of differentiation caused by loss of hyaluronan was confirmed with the hyaluronan synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone. In hyaluronan synthesis-blocked cultures, restoration of the pericellular matrix could be achieved through the addition of exogenous hyaluronan and the proteoglycan versican, but this was not sufficient to restore differentiation to control levels. These data indicate that intrinsic hyaluronan synthesis is necessary for myoblasts to differentiate and form syncytial muscle cells, but the hyaluronan-dependent pericellular matrix is not sufficient to support differentiation alone; additional hyaluronan-dependent cell functions that are yet unknown may be required for myogenic differentiation.
    Last edited by Daibhí O'Buadain; August 22nd, 2018 at 06:05 AM.

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  9. #9
    MD staff Daibhí O'Buadain's Avatar
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    Default Peptides and how they work


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