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Thread: dieting these days for a contest

  1. #52
    Forum Judge Noel Fuller's Avatar
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    I use every trick in the book when dieting a clientstephholy.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bestia View Post
    Isnt quark a scandanavian version of high protein yogurt? I believe i have had it before. Nothing terrible or fantastic about it. Very much like thick greek yogurt if it is what i am thinking of
    That's true. It contains about 9-13 grams of protein per 100 grams. Low fat and low carb if you choose the lean ones.

  3. #54
    Colemanesque Beti ona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeUK View Post
    I'd rather have teaspoon of peanut butter than regular butter.

    The advantage of butter (as with olive or coconut oil) is that after a spoonful, you are not anxious to finish the whole pot as peanut butter, lol.

    The less desirable your meals are, less calories will you eat, it's a fact.

    Keeping stress and cortisol down is more an issue for many
    I agree!
    «Humanity has been led by failures.»

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    Colemanesque Beti ona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeUK View Post
    However, I do think many bodybuilders get too obsessed by the little stuff. Being on a steady deficit and being able to adhere to whatever plan is 98% of it. I’ve came across too many bodybuilders who have minutiae sorted out, but don’t get the basic dea of a deficit and carry too much bodyfat.
    Spot on!

    But again I quote this train of thought, because it does not eliminate all fail possibilities and stick to "non-problematic" foods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beti ona View Post
    This article is about this, and really, the only way to be satisfied is when you eliminate all those tricks from your program (and thus there is no "If") and doing in the hardest way.

    http://geardup.com/articles/authors/...tone-unturned/
    «Humanity has been led by failures.»

  5. #56
    Juggernaut GeorgeUK's Avatar
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    I understand that eating something nice, makes you want to keep eating it. That would apply to peanut butter for sure. However, if I plan on 10g of peanut butter, that's how much I'll have. If its on a rice cake there's less a temptation compared to having a jar of it on your lap with a teaspoon in hand.

    Adhering to the shit we choose to do is a basic requirement that doesn't need an insta post saying you had a WHOLE DAY without eating crap
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    Barbarian AChappell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guvnor View Post
    I don't know the answer to that question. Too much floating conflicting information. I'm sure someone like A.Chappell on here would have the latest on this one.

    I like the 30g idea though, bolus feel that multiple times per days should amount to enough protein for most.
    Current ACSM and ISSN guidelines are between 0.25 to 0.35 g of protein per kg BW is considered sufficient to maximally stimulate protein synthesis. So you can scale it, a 70kg individual might need around 24.5g, while a 100kg individual would need 35g. I believe these numbers however reflect muscle protein, rather than whole body protein synthesis, which is likely to be higher. I'm afraid I'm not much more up to date than that, however I could imagine circumstances where some people might need a little more or less, depending on the circumstances.
    PhD Human Nutrition

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    Forum Judge Noel Fuller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AChappell View Post
    Current ACSM and ISSN guidelines are between 0.25 to 0.35 g of protein per kg BW is considered sufficient to maximally stimulate protein synthesis. So you can scale it, a 70kg individual might need around 24.5g, while a 100kg individual would need 35g. I believe these numbers however reflect muscle protein, rather than whole body protein synthesis, which is likely to be higher. I'm afraid I'm not much more up to date than that, however I could imagine circumstances where some people might need a little more or less, depending on the circumstances.
    Take in more than you need, its not like its going to turn into fat

  8. #59
    Juggernaut GeorgeUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noel Fuller View Post
    Take in more than you need, its not like its going to turn into fat
    It can, but I agree, take in more than you need.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Harris View Post
    Protein limits can't be so arbitrary. The size of the person, their activity level, how much of their body comp is muscle, their metabolism, all have to play a factor. I seriously doubt a Pro Bikini girl and Hapthor Bjornsson at over 400 pounds can both only assimilate 30g of protein at once.
    I haven't found anything of solid confirmation about protein assimilation. I"m leaning towards itd depends on your the particular person like you said.
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  10. #61
    Barbarian AChappell's Avatar
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    I agree, people get caught up about the idea of optimal protein intake and being pragmatic by consuming a little bit more is probably a good idea. People care about these sort of questions though for a for a couple of reasons: 1) maximising muscle growth, 2) metabolic efficiency, and 3) exercise performance.

    They way I see it, if you eat an optimal amount of protein to sustain maximal muscle growth or preserve muscle tissue whilst dieting, then any excess calories can be partitioned into either fat or carbohydrate as an energy source. For example if your eating 3g/kg BW of protein, and could get similar results on 1.6g/kg BW, that's 1.4g/kg BW of protein energy wasted. on your typical 90kg bodybuilder that equates to 126 g of protein or 504 kcal which could be consumed as carbohydrate, or fat, so it's not an insignificant amount. That amount of calories could easily make or break a training session and lead to an increase or decrease in gluconeogenesis which the bodybuilder should be trying to avoid.

    It is worth noting finally the imprecise nature of protein recommendations if you look at ACSM, ISSN, IOC guidelines, there are different recommendations for different populations of athletes that range from 1.2 all the way up to 2.3 g/kg BW, some even express recommendations in terms of lean body mass. As a result, I try not to get caught up in saying you need exactly this amount or that amount, your best in my opinion being pragmatic and working with an athlete and making adjustments dependent on progress.
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeUK View Post
    It can, but I agree, take in more than you need.
    PhD Human Nutrition

  11. #62
    Juggernaut GeorgeUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AChappell View Post
    I agree, people get caught up about the idea of optimal protein intake and being pragmatic by consuming a little bit more is probably a good idea. People care about these sort of questions though for a for a couple of reasons: 1) maximising muscle growth, 2) metabolic efficiency, and 3) exercise performance.

    They way I see it, if you eat an optimal amount of protein to sustain maximal muscle growth or preserve muscle tissue whilst dieting, then any excess calories can be partitioned into either fat or carbohydrate as an energy source. For example if your eating 3g/kg BW of protein, and could get similar results on 1.6g/kg BW, that's 1.4g/kg BW of protein energy wasted. on your typical 90kg bodybuilder that equates to 126 g of protein or 504 kcal which could be consumed as carbohydrate, or fat, so it's not an insignificant amount. That amount of calories could easily make or break a training session and lead to an increase or decrease in gluconeogenesis which the bodybuilder should be trying to avoid.

    It is worth noting finally the imprecise nature of protein recommendations if you look at ACSM, ISSN, IOC guidelines, there are different recommendations for different populations of athletes that range from 1.2 all the way up to 2.3 g/kg BW, some even express recommendations in terms of lean body mass. As a result, I try not to get caught up in saying you need exactly this amount or that amount, your best in my opinion being pragmatic and working with an athlete and making adjustments dependent on progress.
    I guess "more than you need" has its limits. For me 300 is too high and sometimes 275 is too high. My sweet spot is between 200 and 260. I set as many PRs on 225-250 as I do on 300. No way do I want an extra 3-500 cals that could be used in fuelling my training. I know that I'm fine with 200g but like to up it beyond that a little. However I weigh well below 200 on stage so it's fine. A bigger, heavier person would need more. An extra 50g carbs can go a long way when carrying minimal bodyfat.
    *Brotherhood of iron *

  12. #63
    Freak of Nature thegoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AChappell View Post
    Current ACSM and ISSN guidelines are between 0.25 to 0.35 g of protein per kg BW is considered sufficient to maximally stimulate protein synthesis. So you can scale it, a 70kg individual might need around 24.5g, while a 100kg individual would need 35g. I believe these numbers however reflect muscle protein, rather than whole body protein synthesis, which is likely to be higher. I'm afraid I'm not much more up to date than that, however I could imagine circumstances where some people might need a little more or less, depending on the circumstances.
    Gear greatly increases protein synthesis

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