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Thread: Age AND MUSCLE GROWTH

  1. #1

    Default Age AND MUSCLE GROWTH

    When does age play a factor in muscle growth? How can you fight back?

  2. #2

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    It has moreso to do with training experience. There have been many studies done on this. i was reading one recently where they took 55 year old untrained subject and 75 year old untrained subjects and the results achieved after 8 weeks were very similar. i need to start bookmarking my finds, I know I found it through john berardi, i will bug him again to get me the link.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahispeed
    When does age play a factor in muscle growth? How can you fight back?
    After about 30 years or so your body starts to drop off... with that said, many get into fantastic shape after 30... progressive strength training with a proper diet go a long way...

    I. CHANGES IN THE STEROIDOGENIC COMPARTMENT OF THE TESTIS (HERE)

    A. Age Related Changes in Circulating Concentrations of Reproductive Hormones

    For many years, there was considerable controversy over whether serum total testosterone levels were lower in healthy older men; it was argued that older men had lower testosterone levels because of the confounding influence of chronic illness and medications. However, a number of cross-sectional studies are in agreement that even after accounting for the potential confounding factors such as time of sampling, concomitant illness and medications, and technical issues related to hormone assays, serum total testosterone levels are lower in older men in comparison to younger men8-23. Several longitudinal studies13-14 have confirmed a gradual but progressive decrease in serum testosterone concentrations from age 20 to 80. In contrast to the sharp reduction in ovarian estrogen production at menopause, the age-related decline in men does not start at a discrete coordinate in old age; rather, total testosterone concentrations, after reaching a peak in the second and third decade, decline inexorably throughout a man's life (Figure 1). Because of the absence of an identifiable inflection point at which testosterone levels begin to decline abruptly or more rapidly, many investigators have questioned the validity of the concept of "andropause", which misleadingly implies an abrupt cessation of androgen production in men.



    Most of the studies of age-related change in testosterone levels included healthy, older men; it is possible that the rate of age-related decline might even be greater in older men with chronic illness than in healthy, older men. The occurrence of chronic illness, particularly coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus, is a risk factor for low testosterone levels in middle aged men24.

    Sex-hormone binding globulin concentrations are higher in older men than younger men10, 18, 25. Thus, the age-related decline in free testosterone levels is of a greater magnitude than that in total testosterone levels. Similarly, there is a greater percent decline in bioavailable testosterone concentrations than in total testosterone concentrations.

  4. #4

    Default still kicking

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior
    After about 30 years or so your body starts to drop off... with that said, many get into fantastic shape after 30... progressive strength training with a proper diet go a long way...

    I. CHANGES IN THE STEROIDOGENIC COMPARTMENT OF THE TESTIS (HERE)

    A. Age Related Changes in Circulating Concentrations of Reproductive Hormones

    For many years, there was considerable controversy over whether serum total testosterone levels were lower in healthy older men; it was argued that older men had lower testosterone levels because of the confounding influence of chronic illness and medications. However, a number of cross-sectional studies are in agreement that even after accounting for the potential confounding factors such as time of sampling, concomitant illness and medications, and technical issues related to hormone assays, serum total testosterone levels are lower in older men in comparison to younger men8-23. Several longitudinal studies13-14 have confirmed a gradual but progressive decrease in serum testosterone concentrations from age 20 to 80. In contrast to the sharp reduction in ovarian estrogen production at menopause, the age-related decline in men does not start at a discrete coordinate in old age; rather, total testosterone concentrations, after reaching a peak in the second and third decade, decline inexorably throughout a man's life (Figure 1). Because of the absence of an identifiable inflection point at which testosterone levels begin to decline abruptly or more rapidly, many investigators have questioned the validity of the concept of "andropause", which misleadingly implies an abrupt cessation of androgen production in men.



    Most of the studies of age-related change in testosterone levels included healthy, older men; it is possible that the rate of age-related decline might even be greater in older men with chronic illness than in healthy, older men. The occurrence of chronic illness, particularly coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus, is a risk factor for low testosterone levels in middle aged men24.

    Sex-hormone binding globulin concentrations are higher in older men than younger men10, 18, 25. Thus, the age-related decline in free testosterone levels is of a greater magnitude than that in total testosterone levels. Similarly, there is a greater percent decline in bioavailable testosterone concentrations than in total testosterone concentrations.
    I am 37 not that old and still kicking but I have noticed my strength has dropped slightly and sorness has consumed my shoulders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahispeed
    I am 37 not that old and still kicking but I have noticed my strength has dropped slightly and sorness has consumed my shoulders.
    DO you train in your verticle plain? Are you pulling (like pulldowns or pull ups) or pushing (like military presses) behind your neck?

  6. #6

    Default Both

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior
    DO you train in your verticle plain? Are you pulling (like pulldowns or pull ups) or pushing (like military presses) behind your neck?
    I do both pull front and back including shoulders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahispeed
    I do both pull front and back including shoulders.
    Stop pulling and pushing behind your neck and rehab your shoulders...

  8. #8

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    I do a light work out for shoulders to reduce the pain seems to have slowed.

  9. #9
    Amateur Threat Timski's Avatar
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    I`m 51 and still making gains............you just have to train a bit differently when older and make sure your nutrition is on point.

    I now do more warmup sets than when I was younger, and instead of just trying to move a heavy weight from "Point A" to "Point B",I now slow down the TUT and squeeze the muscle I`m training in the contracted position.

    Also,lots of intensity techniques work well, such as drop-sets,super-sets,tri-sets,giant-sets,pre-exhaust,rest pause,less rest time between sets,doing compound exercises last in a workout,etc. etc.

    These things allow or force you to use less poundage, but the lighter weight still feels heavy due to the increased intensity..........saves a lot of wear and tear on joints and ligaments bigtime!

    I still train heavy for my targeted rep range on any set,but try harder to link the mind with the muscle a lot more than I did in my younger years of training.

    37 is not old when you hit your 50`s,it`s only old when you are 37 !! LOL
    Strictly Business

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahispeed
    I do a light work out for shoulders to reduce the pain seems to have slowed.
    The ball jopint located in the shoulder is capable of a lot of different angles - some of which can wear on it when heavy loads impose a demand on the joints integrity. Due to several issues, it is extremely prone to injury from weight training. You might be able to get away with light reps behind your neck - but once you go heavy - you will be back to injury. Eliminate all work behind your neck - this is from research and personal experience with this type of injury...

    Stop wotk in your verticle plane - start some rehab measures to get it healing... pull and push just forward of it...

  11. #11

    Default Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior
    The ball jopint located in the shoulder is capable of a lot of different angles - some of which can wear on it when heavy loads impose a demand on the joints integrity. Due to several issues, it is extremely prone to injury from weight training. You might be able to get away with light reps behind your neck - but once you go heavy - you will be back to injury. Eliminate all work behind your neck - this is from research and personal experience with this type of injury...

    Stop wotk in your verticle plane - start some rehab measures to get it healing... pull and push just forward of it...
    I will try it and see what happens.

  12. #12
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    Well I'm 40 today and have now been training for 27 years and I'm in the best shape of my life. And I have always been in decent shape. I do now have alot more aches and pains.As soon as I can figure out how to post a picture I will. I workout 6 days aweek. And do cardio 5-6 days a week after weightlifting for usually 30 mins. I also eat pretty good. So at 40 I'm still getting in better shape. It's never to late to start a workout program.

  13. #13
    Amateur Threat Timski's Avatar
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    Happy Birthday kid!!
    Strictly Business

  14. #14
    The Physique Architect str8flexed's Avatar
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    loss of muscle mass typically starts around age 45 with a loss of about 1%/year after that.

    oddly enough I just gave a presentation on this. I could upload the powerpoint if you guys want
    BioLayne LLC
    PhD, Nutritional Sciences
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  15. #15
    Dedicated Noob Groink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timski
    I`m 51 and still making gains............you just have to train a bit differently when older and make sure your nutrition is on point.

    I now do more warmup sets than when I was younger, and instead of just trying to move a heavy weight from "Point A" to "Point B",I now slow down the TUT and squeeze the muscle I`m training in the contracted position.

    Also,lots of intensity techniques work well, such as drop-sets,super-sets,tri-sets,giant-sets,pre-exhaust,rest pause,less rest time between sets,doing compound exercises last in a workout,etc. etc.

    These things allow or force you to use less poundage, but the lighter weight still feels heavy due to the increased intensity..........saves a lot of wear and tear on joints and ligaments bigtime!

    I still train heavy for my targeted rep range on any set,but try harder to link the mind with the muscle a lot more than I did in my younger years of training.

    37 is not old when you hit your 50`s,it`s only old when you are 37 !! LOL
    Props to you for still having the fire in your belly at 51.
    I'm turning 40 this year and people like you motivate me greatly when Iv'e got the "i'm gettin old" blues.
    Jay is not Mr O

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    Quote Originally Posted by str8flexed
    loss of muscle mass typically starts around age 45 with a loss of about 1%/year after that.

    oddly enough I just gave a presentation on this. I could upload the powerpoint if you guys want
    yes please

  17. #17
    The Physique Architect str8flexed's Avatar
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    eh crap i can't post a Powerpoint on this board
    BioLayne LLC
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