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Thread: IFBB Pro Evan Centopani Q&A

  1. #69
    IFBB - PRO Evan Centopani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oregonpanthers View Post
    Out of curiousity Evan, how many meals per day do you typicaly put down? How many calories do you usually aim for? Being that this is your offseason and I assume your going balls to the wall with eating and training I wanted to hear from the man himself as to how you feed the beast?
    Right now, eating is very conservative. I always consume 6 meals per day. Typically 3 whole food meals and 3 shakes. Calories I don't count. Fat intake and protein intake stays relatively the same between offseason and precontest. Carbs are the main variable. When trying to put on size my carb intake and selection will change. More glycemix carbs at key times etc. I haven't established my offseason regimine as of yet. As soon as I do, you will all be the first to hear the details.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan Centopani View Post
    I don't know to tell you the truth. I did my first show in June 2005 (The Bev Francis Atlantic States) where I won the overall as a heavyweight at 225. And in all honesty, I believed in myself at that time and thought I had the potential to take my physique to the next level. But I don't know when I made an actual transition. I guess you could say that a lot happened in the past year working with Dave and nailing my nutritional habits.
    At what age did you start weight training? What do you think attributed the most to the amount of mass you currently carry??? Was it then training /diet/ or gear. Please be honest.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carpe Diem View Post
    At what age did you start weight training? What do you think attributed the most to the amount of mass you currently carry??? Was it then training /diet/ or gear. Please be honest.....
    First of all, gear is NEVER the main reason for anyone's success or the progression in their development. Gear may be the main reason you see your local gym rat's arms looking swollen one day and a couple of weeks later he looks like he has never touched a weight. But for anyone who is successful in the sport of bodybuilding, the main factors that contribute to their success is genetics, diet, and hard work. There is no secret formula or magic potion. Hard work coupled with intelligent decision making is the closest your going to get to a secret formula. And that's me being honest. I believe that my genetic makeup enables me to gain a lot of weight but that can easily be fat as well. The fact that I train hard and don't do stupid things such as eat a bunch of crap from McDonalds just to gain size becaue that's what my friend's buddy's uncle told him he needs a lot of calories to grow. I make my own choices as to what I think is necessary or what I think makes sense and what will ultimately benefit me in the long run. I go to great lengths to take care of my body. What made Jay Cutler a top pro for so many years and now Mr. Olympia? You could say it's his genetics it's the supplements he takes etc. The real answer is that the man is a PRO in every sense of the word. He makes bodybuilding his job. And that means he goes to great lengths to take care of himself in every possible way to ensure that his body is in top form. What do I attribute my ability to carry mass to? Mainly genetics. But understand, mass doesn't mean anything if it isn't aesthetic. I see a lot of massive strongmen on T.V. whose physiques are not impressive because they are not aesthetic or in any way appealing. That has nothing to do with bodybuilding. What do I attribute the success that I have had thus far in the sport of bodybuilding to? Using my BRAIN and also utilizing the insight of those around me. Bodybuilding is, in my opinion more about your mind than your body. I hope this helps .

  4. #72

    Default help with my diet?

    I was wondering if you had time could u tel me what i should change about my diet.i cant stand oats and sick of eggs. i weigh 158lbs. trying to add as much muscle as possible.
    1.weight gain shake, 4 wheatabix with semi skimmed milk, banana
    2.one chicken breast, 1/2 cup brown rice
    3.Tuna and 1/2 packet pasta
    4.weight gain shake with either dextrose or banana
    5.lean mince beef, pasta
    6.peppered steak, 1/2 cup of rice
    7. 2 peanut butter on toast with added peanuts. or prawns and salad
    8.weight gain shake.
    after puttin this in wrting my diet looks prety bad :-s

  5. #73
    Dedicated Noob kartwheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan Centopani View Post
    Thanks bro. Your support is much appreciated. Pressure? There's a little of that going on right now but nothing I can't handle. You say you're surprised I haven't changed and mentioned that I've stayed grounded. I think that's the way it has to be. I've always tried to maintain balance in my life. I think there are guys who throw everything they have into the sport and it consumes them. While I admire their dedication I do not see the value of being one dimensional. I believe that the key to success in any endeavor (long-term success that is) is to mainatin balance. Everything must also be cyclical; training eating etc. Otherwise you encounter stagnation. Having said all of this I think that the things you say can be related to the fact that when I think about who I am, bodybuilder is not the first thing that comes to mind. You have to be a human being first and foremost. I enjoy being around my family and my girlfriend, I like training, I like cooking, I like watching the f'in Discovery Channel. In my mind, traing and eating aside, I do what everyone else does or at least that is how I see it in my mind. I have made a conscious effort to not consume myself with bodybuilding because I don't see that as being beneficial. I remember hearing stories about bodybuilders missing funerals, weddings and other significant events because they didn't want to screw up training or their diet and I think that's said. I refuse to be that. I like to think that before I consider myslef a good bodybuilder, I must first be able to say I'm a good son, brother, boyfriend, friend, person, etc. And I truly believe that balance is what will lead to my success. So to get back to your post, don't worry, my mind is clear and my plan of attack is in place for that pro card. Thanks again for the post bro.
    You just made a new fan and supporter. i'm inspired to eventually be your size. at 25, 6' and 212, i've never been the fat kid, just the skinny one. working hard from the 6', 150 lbs high school basketball player frame to the 250 lbs man i want to be. good luck, evan, in all you do.

  6. #74
    IFBB - PRO Evan Centopani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kartwheel View Post
    You just made a new fan and supporter. i'm inspired to eventually be your size. at 25, 6' and 212, i've never been the fat kid, just the skinny one. working hard from the 6', 150 lbs high school basketball player frame to the 250 lbs man i want to be. good luck, evan, in all you do.
    Best of luck to you bro. Through consistency and determination I have no doubt you will reach your goal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan Centopani View Post
    First of all, gear is NEVER the main reason for anyone's success or the progression in their development. Gear may be the main reason you see your local gym rat's arms looking swollen one day and a couple of weeks later he looks like he has never touched a weight. But for anyone who is successful in the sport of bodybuilding, the main factors that contribute to their success is genetics, diet, and hard work. There is no secret formula or magic potion. Hard work coupled with intelligent decision making is the closest your going to get to a secret formula. And that's me being honest. I believe that my genetic makeup enables me to gain a lot of weight but that can easily be fat as well. The fact that I train hard and don't do stupid things such as eat a bunch of crap from McDonalds just to gain size becaue that's what my friend's buddy's uncle told him he needs a lot of calories to grow. I make my own choices as to what I think is necessary or what I think makes sense and what will ultimately benefit me in the long run. I go to great lengths to take care of my body. What made Jay Cutler a top pro for so many years and now Mr. Olympia? You could say it's his genetics it's the supplements he takes etc. The real answer is that the man is a PRO in every sense of the word. He makes bodybuilding his job. And that means he goes to great lengths to take care of himself in every possible way to ensure that his body is in top form. What do I attribute my ability to carry mass to? Mainly genetics. But understand, mass doesn't mean anything if it isn't aesthetic. I see a lot of massive strongmen on T.V. whose physiques are not impressive because they are not aesthetic or in any way appealing. That has nothing to do with bodybuilding. What do I attribute the success that I have had thus far in the sport of bodybuilding to? Using my BRAIN and also utilizing the insight of those around me. Bodybuilding is, in my opinion more about your mind than your body. I hope this helps .

    Thanks evan for this input....I hope to stand next to you in the future on stage....that is my goal in the year to come to lean down and show up in a shape similar to yourself.....until then keep on truckin!!!

  8. #76

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    hey Evan i was just curious about your crazy ass arms. i read you articles in MD. i was curious, clearly genetics at work here coupled with tons of hard work. i was just wondering since i noticed that for the "basics" like barbell curls and skullcrushers you "only" go up to 135 or so, i was wondering in the past did you used to go heavier, and like a lot of pros change it up to avoid injury, or do you hold back some to avoid injury and essentially maintain? im not trying to insult you or anything im just curious why seemingly its much lighter then you would expect from a guy with arms like yours. i guess its similar to jay cutlers style, but i also noticed for dumbell curls you go up to 90 pounds or so (?) for 6-8 resp, so obviously theres power to spare. just curious cuz you have some sick ass arms? im a huge mike matarazzo fan and it looks like your the second coming lol. anyway not to give you to much of an ego boost but i think everyone will agree that getting your pro card is almost a formality at this point. regardless good luck and its good to see someone come up so fast and still have a great attitude.

  9. #77
    IFBB - PRO Evan Centopani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerj.simpson View Post
    hey Evan i was just curious about your crazy ass arms. i read you articles in MD. i was curious, clearly genetics at work here coupled with tons of hard work. i was just wondering since i noticed that for the "basics" like barbell curls and skullcrushers you "only" go up to 135 or so, i was wondering in the past did you used to go heavier, and like a lot of pros change it up to avoid injury, or do you hold back some to avoid injury and essentially maintain? im not trying to insult you or anything im just curious why seemingly its much lighter then you would expect from a guy with arms like yours. i guess its similar to jay cutlers style, but i also noticed for dumbell curls you go up to 90 pounds or so (?) for 6-8 resp, so obviously theres power to spare. just curious cuz you have some sick ass arms? im a huge mike matarazzo fan and it looks like your the second coming lol. anyway not to give you to much of an ego boost but i think everyone will agree that getting your pro card is almost a formality at this point. regardless good luck and its good to see someone come up so fast and still have a great attitude.
    First off, thanks bro. It's funny you say that about Mike Matarazzo, I get that all the time. Also, he's one of the guys I always looked up to when I first started picking up the mags. As for my arm training, I'm not going to lie. Genetics have played a huge part. I think I had 18 inch arms back in high school and was curling 70s. I have found that too much weight makes me more likely to injur myself. I've hurt my wrists, elbows, forearmss etc by trying to use too much weight. And I've found that I can still effectively stimulate the muscle with less weight. I'm comfotable with weight like that so that's what I use. I may incorporate more intensity via drop sets, super sets etc but I don't see the need for too much weight. I've really come to put my ego aside when training and come to understand that good results can be attained without astronomical amounts of weight. My friend Justin Miller summed it up perfectlyy when he said, "Move the weights in a fashion as to work your muscles, don't use you muscles to just move weight around" We are bodybuilders, not powerlifters. It took me a long time to grasp that concept. Building strength doesn't mean you will consequently build muscle. Powerlifters being a prime example. It's about mind muscle connection and technique, not weight. As for me attaining a pro card, nothing is guaranteed and this year I will leave nothing to chance. I plan to work harder than I have ever worked and be smarter than I have been in the past so that when Novemeber comes I can say I gave it my all. Thanks again bro for all your encouragment and support.

  10. #78
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    Evan- what were some of your stats as a senior in highschool ( measurments, wieghts etc.)
    just wondering how i compare as i am a senior in highschool right now
    thanks
    peace

  11. #79
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    Meatball huh? I like it. When I was a senior in high school I was about 220 lbs @ 5'11". My arms were pretty far ahead of everything else at 18 inches but my back and chest were both expanding pretty quickly. Back then my legs were ahead of my upper body. Dammit I wish that was my problem now. I was squatting 405 to the floor (very strict) for like 8 or 10. I don't really know any other measurements though. Just remember, do your thing and don't worry what anyone else looks like or is doing. Stick by your own convictions.

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    awesome thanks alot your a great role model for young bodybuilders
    I wish you much success in the future.

  13. #81
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    Default great posts... and avoiding chemical warfare

    Evan you responses are very articulate, and well written. It's obvious you have that education behind you. It's really so good to read your insights, especially the latest reply on "supplements". I haven't taken that route quite yet as school and a blood clot while deadlifting have set me back with competing, but I feel that every day of training without it, will help out later on when I can compete and it's time for gear use. I really feel that if you're not getting failry big while drug-free, steroids aren't going to do much at all as there are genetic limitations and other aspects (poor diet, sleep, etc) that limit the help steroids provide. You are a model of the factors that make a great bodybuilder. I'm still jealous that you're only a year older than me and so good lol, jk man... I'm very impressed. You (when you get that pro card this year) and Desmond Miller are going to give some fresh air to this sport.

    One question. How does one avoid chemical warfare when you get into the pro ranks...or even now at the national ranks? As you care about life outside of bodybuilding, does it become a matter of training just that much harder and smarter? I'm sure you have invaluable insight on this, and I value your opinion on this.

    Take care man.

    Jamie from Canada

  14. #82

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    Perfectly stated Evan. Couldn't have said it better myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan Centopani View Post
    First of all, gear is NEVER the main reason for anyone's success or the progression in their development. Gear may be the main reason you see your local gym rat's arms looking swollen one day and a couple of weeks later he looks like he has never touched a weight. But for anyone who is successful in the sport of bodybuilding, the main factors that contribute to their success is genetics, diet, and hard work. There is no secret formula or magic potion. Hard work coupled with intelligent decision making is the closest your going to get to a secret formula. And that's me being honest. I believe that my genetic makeup enables me to gain a lot of weight but that can easily be fat as well. The fact that I train hard and don't do stupid things such as eat a bunch of crap from McDonalds just to gain size becaue that's what my friend's buddy's uncle told him he needs a lot of calories to grow. I make my own choices as to what I think is necessary or what I think makes sense and what will ultimately benefit me in the long run. I go to great lengths to take care of my body. What made Jay Cutler a top pro for so many years and now Mr. Olympia? You could say it's his genetics it's the supplements he takes etc. The real answer is that the man is a PRO in every sense of the word. He makes bodybuilding his job. And that means he goes to great lengths to take care of himself in every possible way to ensure that his body is in top form. What do I attribute my ability to carry mass to? Mainly genetics. But understand, mass doesn't mean anything if it isn't aesthetic. I see a lot of massive strongmen on T.V. whose physiques are not impressive because they are not aesthetic or in any way appealing. That has nothing to do with bodybuilding. What do I attribute the success that I have had thus far in the sport of bodybuilding to? Using my BRAIN and also utilizing the insight of those around me. Bodybuilding is, in my opinion more about your mind than your body. I hope this helps .

  15. #83
    IFBB - PRO Evan Centopani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strungoutforever View Post
    Evan you responses are very articulate, and well written. It's obvious you have that education behind you. It's really so good to read your insights, especially the latest reply on "supplements". I haven't taken that route quite yet as school and a blood clot while deadlifting have set me back with competing, but I feel that every day of training without it, will help out later on when I can compete and it's time for gear use. I really feel that if you're not getting failry big while drug-free, steroids aren't going to do much at all as there are genetic limitations and other aspects (poor diet, sleep, etc) that limit the help steroids provide. You are a model of the factors that make a great bodybuilder. I'm still jealous that you're only a year older than me and so good lol, jk man... I'm very impressed. You (when you get that pro card this year) and Desmond Miller are going to give some fresh air to this sport.

    One question. How does one avoid chemical warfare when you get into the pro ranks...or even now at the national ranks? As you care about life outside of bodybuilding, does it become a matter of training just that much harder and smarter? I'm sure you have invaluable insight on this, and I value your opinion on this.

    Take care man.

    Jamie from Canada
    You sound like you yourslef are pretty level-headed; avoiding the gear and what not. I applaud you for this. You don't know how many kids who I assume are still in high school approach me and start to talk about bodybuilding and training and then, ultimately it becomes apparent that all they really want to know about is gear. This agravates me. You hit the nail on the head when you said "really feel that if you're not getting failry big while drug-free, steroids aren't going to do much at all as there are genetic limitations and other aspects (poor diet, sleep, etc) that limit the help steroids provide. " That is in fact 100% true. If you are not getting results WITHOUT them, then what does that say about what your prosepective results WITH them? Doesn't look good. This should be taken as a sign. I remember one time my dad saying "you can't make chicken soup out of chicken shit". And that's true. If your training is bad, your nutrition is less than optimal, and you have bad habits outside of the gym that contradict the bodybuilding lifestyle, it doesn't matter what you put in your body. Another vey intelligent notion which I was glad to hear you mention is waiting as long as possible and then still having the option at a later time to us or not use the gear. Simply put, the farther you get without it, you're going to be that much further along with it. Through proper nutrition, training and lifestyle it is definite possible to achieve results comparable or in some cases better than those of someone who is on the gear. Then what happens if you decide to add it? You then have the potential to easily surpass those who were comparable to you. The best advice I can give is to wait as long as possible and master your training and nutrition first and ride out the benefits of your own hormones. I'm glad you posted this question, you sound like a smart kid. Good luck.

  16. #84
    IFBB - PRO Evan Centopani's Avatar
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    Matt Burzacott! What's up bro, good to see you here.

  17. #85

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    Evan, I know Dave advocates an extremely low carb (around 30g/day) high protein/fat approach for precontest nutrition with the occasional carb meal to "put a little gas in the tank". I have tried this approach myself with success but it takes time to get used to it initially because the brain and body has to metabolically switch from carb burining to fat burning. Do you ever use this method or do you follow a more conventional moderate carb diet that cycles?

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