Muscular Development Forums - Powered by vBulletin

View Poll Results: What are the prospects for the future of the US economy?

Voters
75. You may not vote on this poll
  • The US economy will rebound within 5 years

    36 48.00%
  • It stay in decline and alter our lives permanently

    21 28.00%
  • We don't have enough information, yet.

    18 24.00%
Page 53 of 53 FirstFirst ... 34344454647484950515253
Results 885 to 889 of 889

Thread: The Economy Thread

  1. #885
    Amateur Threat sargent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A Cold Place
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    You have been warned: Housing Recovery? What recovery?

    Housing Rebound in U.S. Losing Steam as Prices Rise

    By Lorraine Woellert Apr 24, 2014

    The housing recovery in the U.S. is running out of steam as buyers balk at record prices and highermortgage rates that are making properties less affordable.

    Sales dropped a surprising 14.5 percent to a 384,000annualized pace, lower than any forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg and the weakest since July, Commerce Department data showed today inWashington. Three of the four regions saw setbacks, with demand in the West slumping to the lowest level in more than two years.


    Save
    Entire: Housing Rebound in U.S. Losing Steam as Prices Rise - Bloomberg



    And this.....14 years:


    Demand for Home Loans Plunges

    Interest-Rate Spike Puts Mortgages at 14-Year Low


    By NICK TIMIRAOS
    CONNECT

    Updated April 24, 2014
    Mortgage lending declined to the lowest level in 14 years in the first quarter as homeowners pulled back sharply from refinancing and house hunters showed little appetite for new loans, the latest sign of how rising interest rates have dented the housing recovery.

    Lenders originated $235 billion in mortgage loans during the January-March quarter, down 58% from the same period a year ago and down 23% from the fourth quarter of 2013,...
    Entire: Demand for Home Loans Plunges - WSJ.com

  2. #886
    Beach Body Mater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    590
    Gender
    Male

    Default

    housing is in a bubble, just like the stock and bond markets
    -Mater

  3. #887
    Amateur Threat
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101710406?__s...od&par=xfinity

    Uber’s $90K salary could disrupt the taxi business

    Uber cab drivers in New York are raking in near-six-figure salaries—about triple the amount their traditional taxi driver counterparts make, according to an article in The Washington Post.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, New York cab drivers make about $32,000 a year. Uber claims the average salary for its drivers in the same city is above $90,000, presumably after the company takes its 20 percent cut from the driver's total fares. That number does not account for vehicle maintenance costs and such, but it may still explain why 20,000 drivers sign up with Uber every month, according to the company.

    Smartphones deserve some of the credit. UberX drivers rely on them for leads, so they do not have to drive around hoping to be in the right place at the right time for a fare.The company claims it can serve 43 percent of the U.S. population with a cab in less than five minutes. Uber also packs mechanisms into its app that allow both drivers and passengers to rate each other. The Post's Matt McFarland thinks such a simple measure may make longstanding taxi regulation schemes in some U.S. cities unnecessary.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...d-cab-drivers/

  4. #888
    Amateur Threat sargent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A Cold Place
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    More of the same:

    Bad to worse: US economy shrank more than expected in Q1

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101787838

  5. #889
    Amateur Threat
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    https://www.themuse.com/advice/dear-...ate-candidates

    Dear Hiring Managers: Stop Rejecting "Desperate" Candidates

    Kathryn recently went on a job interview and felt like she nailed it. In fact, the hiring manager started talking about start dates, so she was shocked when she spoke to the recruiter the following morning and found out that company had decided she wasn’t a “good fit.” Kathryn pushed the recruiter for additional feedback, which the recruiter reluctantly shared. Her problem? She seemed too desperate for the job.

    Desperation is a big turn off for many employers. This, of course, has some logic behind it. Desperate people will take any job they are offered, and employers don’t like that. They want someone who wants this job, because otherwise, the employee is likely to leave when something better comes along.

    So, avoiding the desperate means you have less of a chance of hiring someone who isn’t a good fit. But, let’s be honest here, have you ever been desperate?

    I have been. It took me a while to land a job after finishing graduate school, because let’s face it, how many job openings do you see that say, “Help Wanted: Political Scientist. Must be able to discuss Nietzsche and do regression analysis.” Yep, that was me. So, was I pretty desperate by the time I finally landed a job? Yes. Am I grateful that the hiring manager didn’t say, “Gee, I can see that she’s been out of school for five months. She must be living off credit cards and noodle ramen. Let’s not hire her.” Yes.

    For some reason, it’s okay for businesses to not be perfect, but not job candidates. Businesses underpay, misrepresent how flexible their schedules really are, and often have bad managers. Yet, if a job candidate comes across as someone who desperately wants to get back to work (or wants to change jobs), we reject them. Which leaves candidates who are currently unemployed (or are in bad jobs) in the weird position of having to pretend that they are fabulously wealthy and just want to get a job to get them out of the house for a bit.

    Isn’t that ridiculous? People need money, and we want them to get that through working. So, before you reject someone because they want any job, consider if the job you are offering is perfect. Could you possibly be underpaying? If so, then you should be thrilled that you’ve found someone who is worth more than you can pay, even if it’s for a short time. Is your staff overworked? If so, you should be doing a happy dance that you’ve found someone who is willing to put up with your crazy demands. Do you have developmental opportunities? If not, you should be glad that you’ve found someone that wants to move forward with their career, but is willing to work for you for a time.

    Additionally, keep in mind that most people are not great at job interviews and those that are great at interviewing aren’t necessarily the best at working. Someone who projects desperation may have the exact skills you need in the job. Don’t discount them because of a bad interview.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that people don’t stay at jobs for 20 years any more. Your perfect candidate isn’t likely to stay that much longer than the person who took the job out of desperation.

    Your first priority should be hiring someone who can do a fabulous job, and sometimes that person is desperate for a job. Don’t reject on that basis alone.

Page 53 of 53 FirstFirst ... 34344454647484950515253

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •