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Thread: Baseball / Pitcher workout

  1. #1
    Spotter Harpo's Avatar
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    Default Baseball / Pitcher workout

    Hey guys,

    My nephew is a 19 yr old college sophomore pitcher. He is hitting ~91 mph with control, about 4 or 5 decent pitches. He is 6'1, 185, strong and 19yrs old. He is having conflicting guidance from a bunch of "know it all"s within his organization and groups that he plays with in collegiate summer leagues, as far as training goes. Ultimately, his goals are to maintain his speeds and obviously increase them to his fullest potential. He would also like to maintain and improve his already great physical conditioning.

    I have recommended various versions of boxing workouts, explosive compounding lifts that focus on lower body as well as core movements, 300 style workouts, HIIT training when dealing with cardio, stretching and other exercises that I typically used to improve my own punching power (simialar movements..), core strengths, and jumping ability / foot work. I also have suggested various organizational methods for planning his workouts in the offseason (pitching after a lift to heal in a pitching form (this worked awesome for me with basketball and boxing)).

    Fall ball is done, so the only real baseball that he needs to worry about right now is pitching practice. It will be ok for him to suffer some speed right now as long as it pays off in the spring.

    So from here, I am asking anyone with knowledge on the subject to throw in their $.02. Any input or insight will be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks in advance....

    HARPO!

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    IFBB PRO Dominick Cardone's Avatar
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    My opinion is core, agility, speed training, sparq training. As well shoulder movements but very light. This may help avoid injury and increase speed. Just my .02 on what I think will help. But very good stats for college, I wish him good luck.
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    Spotter Harpo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AfterShock View Post
    My opinion is core, agility, speed training, sparq training. As well shoulder movements but very light. This may help avoid injury and increase speed. Just my .02 on what I think will help. But very good stats for college, I wish him good luck.

    Yeah, his physical stats are pretty good. He had a bit of an adjustment period from HS to college. Before, he could just muscle the ball past 90% of the batters he faced. Now, his control and mind games are more of a factor. He is confident as hell, so that is great. He is also very motivated and committed to reaching his maximum potential. He did a collegiate summer league this past summer and made some great gains on his control. He is working out hard and all, but I feel like he has been swayed in multiple directions by a bunch of "trainers" that only know strength, if that makes any sense. It sounds like his routines are not very catering to his position. We just would like to see him squeeze an extra MPH on the gun by this spring while improving that control/endurance.....

    Thanks for your input!

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    i don't know much about baseball, im from australia, but i would definately be making sure he trains his rotator cuffs ( both internal and external rotaions) and also definatly make sure you train the antagonistic muscles ( rear delts, rhomboids, mid and lower traps, lats). This is a must for injury prevention, and considering he is so young he should get into good habbits. just as fast as he throws the ball he needs to be able to slow his arm down at the same pace, when there is a muscle imbalnace, that is when injurys are more likley to occur.
    he should also be sure to train both sides of the body evenly as this would also help with injury prevention.
    this is my 2 cents!

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    you need to do skull crushers... thats what pitchers do...

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    Quote Originally Posted by AfterShock View Post
    My opinion is core, agility, speed training, sparq training. As well shoulder movements but very light. This may help avoid injury and increase speed. Just my .02 on what I think will help. But very good stats for college, I wish him good luck.
    Good post. For core, focus a lot on rotational movements, like russian twists, wood-choppers, ect.

    I'd also suggest working on the hips, legs, and ankles. If he's pitching, he will push off the mound hard, so theoretically, the harder he can push off, the faster he can pitch.

    Good luck.

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    Spotter Harpo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sugashane View Post
    Good post. For core, focus a lot on rotational movements, like russian twists, wood-choppers, ect.

    I'd also suggest working on the hips, legs, and ankles. If he's pitching, he will push off the mound hard, so theoretically, the harder he can push off, the faster he can pitch.

    Good luck.

    I agree with all of that. The way I figure, the start of the pitch comes from him sticking his foot into the mound and pushing up/out with the legs. The more power that he can generate from the ground up, coupled with that twisting snap at his hips to core to shoulders......to elbow to wrist, the more power and velocity that will be generated into the flight of the ball.

    They did a little bit of the 300 workout with tires, etc. his freshman fall semester, and I noticed a size difference when we were together at Christmas time. That has the same movements in it as those first ones you mentioned. Seems to help him a lot then, should do the same now. He just needs to step up the intensity.

    Thanks for everyone's input and thanks in advance for any more that I receive!

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    Spotter Harpo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by louie_d View Post
    i don't know much about baseball, im from australia, but i would definately be making sure he trains his rotator cuffs ( both internal and external rotaions) and also definatly make sure you train the antagonistic muscles ( rear delts, rhomboids, mid and lower traps, lats). This is a must for injury prevention, and considering he is so young he should get into good habbits. just as fast as he throws the ball he needs to be able to slow his arm down at the same pace, when there is a muscle imbalnace, that is when injurys are more likley to occur.
    he should also be sure to train both sides of the body evenly as this would also help with injury prevention.
    this is my 2 cents!
    Very important as well. Pitching is awfully demanding on the body, especially in a growing young man like my nephew. You can seriously foul things up if caution is lacking in your day to day. He has a specific stretching routine that he got from a pitching specialist and I feel like I heard it involves stretching bands. I'll see if he can't type it up and email to me to post. This could come in handy for any other pitchers or boxers/MMA/etc.

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    a ton of ab work, low back work-both traditional and incorporating bosu/stability balls, rotator cuff, and deep squats. Flexibility with a great stretching program would be very important.

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    Core, Balance drills, deep squats and box squats.

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    triceps do play a big part in throwing also, legs of course and something that ive heard that i think is effective is throwing a football too

  12. #12
    CaseyFathi
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    i played ball in high school and 1 year in college in florida...personally i think muscle has very little to do in the sport...very little in hitting and almost nothing in pitching/throwing. the hardest throwing pitchers were lanky and so were most of the hitters and others who were drafted. i think it's all about TORQUE....how fast the arm and hips can go thru the movement, which i think comes naturally and if anything the core strength exercises(middle of the body) and some rotator cuff work could help.

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    LouieD has given some solid advice on strengthening the rear delts, trap areas as well as prehab work with rotator cuff muscles. I'd have him look at a basic anatomy chart and learn the function of the rotator cuff muscles, becasue he needs to learn how to respond to any shoulder issues or at least know what to report to a trainer if problems occur. One of the major purposes of physical preparation for sport is to first perform the sport to the maximum ability of the athlete and to play the sport as long as possible injury free. The preventative attitude can help so he doesn't have to experience such symptoms, but if he is he can act on it quickly and properly.

    But as others have touched upon as well as CaseyFathi, with such a task as pitching a baseball, one doesn't have to be in great physical shape to perform at a high level. I would take it very seriously and have gpp work in my off season, but that's just me. Many many professional baseball players from all era's of the game have shown you that you can be one of the best in the game without having many other physical skills. It comes down to natural ability and time spent playing the sport. I think these pitchers, without naming anyone specifically should take more pride in their body and I feel they could even be that much better with stronger posterior chains, looser hips, stronger necks, etc. But as time has shown, we can have all the knowledge in the world about exercise science and biomechanics, but you have to have the natural ability in the first place to perform. Harpo, I wish your nephew all the luck and longevity in the world and hopefully sticks with baseball and trains appropriately, as an athlete.

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