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Thread: Is glutamine an effective bodybuilding ergogenic?

  1. #52
    Beach Body LotusMan's Avatar
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    I take a teaspoon of glutamine first thing in the morning. Supposedly it stops nighttime catabolism and it's great for the immune system so why not.

  2. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by LotusMan View Post
    I take a teaspoon of glutamine first thing in the morning. Supposedly it stops nighttime catabolism and it's great for the immune system so why not.
    Blind faith my son.

  3. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by natron View Post
    Blind faith my son.

    please enlighten all of us that are duped sir...obviously you have secret information that the rest of us do not...

  4. #55
    Super Moderator heavyiron's Avatar
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    An article written by Warrior;

    Glutamine for muscle growth and fat loss
    http://www.warriorfx.com/2008/06/glu...-and-fat-loss/
    June 01st, 2008

    There are massive amounts of nutritional supplements marketed toward athletes today. Many magic-pill wonders quickly fade away as other fitness fads hit the market – each making a few dollars during their short shelf life. Others withstand the test of time; positively passing many scientific and anecdotal trials. Probably the most debated dietary supplement available is glutamine. It’s a non-essential amino acid, which means it can be synthesized in the body. The big question facing bodybuilders is whether exogenous use is necessary to build muscle and lose fat.

    Glutamine is the body’s most abundant amino acid, the building blocks of proteins. Since glutamine represents 60 percent of the amino acid pool in muscle, depleted levels can affect fullness and performance. It is the amino acid most transported between organs. Plasma amino acid concentrations are around 30 percent glutamine, in healthy individuals. Clearly, a deficiency could disrupt homeostasis in the human body.

    Adults are capable of producing glutamine at a rate of around 50 to 70 grams per day. However, a considerable problem with athlete’s relying on endogenous synthesis of glutamine is the modest rate at which the body can manufacture it. In the diet, glutamine represents around 5 to 10 percent of the total amino acid content in ordinary food. Someone consuming around 100 to 200 grams of protein per day is expected to obtain 5 to 20 grams of glutamine.

    Athletes routinely engaged in strenuous and sustained exercise will increase their metabolic need for glutamine. A deficiency becomes greater when a person eats an acidic diet in conjunction with demanding exercise.

    For optimal performance and health, athletes must maintain an appropriate acid-base balance in the body – to avoid metabolic acidosis. To neutralize the drop in pH, bodily processes begin breaking down muscle tissue for glutamine to supply a blood-buffering effect. Lung and brain tissue also produce glutamine, but skeletal muscle is the most readily available source for the blood stream. Additionally, the body can grab calcium salts from bone to provide an alkaline base. Accelerated glutamine losses adversely affect exercise performance by weakening bones and muscular contractions, in addition to encouraging muscle cramping. Supplementing with heavy loads of exogenous glutamine can help offset acidic conditions in athletes.

    Certain dietary changes can help buffer blood pH – and spare endogenous glutamine supplies. Examples of acidic foods to eat in moderation include: wine, coffee, cereal grains, corn, beans, legumes, nuts, meats, fish, eggs, dairy and salt. Vegetables and fruits are largely alkaline; exceptions include: plums, prunes and cranberries. Bodybuilders and powerlifters often eat a lot of acidic foods for their protein content, such as meats, eggs and dairy products. This dietary practice further puts the spotlight on supplemental glutamine support.

    Excessive trauma from training or injury increases glutamine demands in the body. Many researchers have illustrated the advantages of dietary glutamine in patients with severe burn injuries, an extremely catabolic state. A 2003 study reviewed glutamine’s effects on patients suffering from burns between 50 to 80 percent of their body surface. Researchers revealed a significant increase in plasma glutamine levels with 0.35 grams of glutamine per kilogram of bodyweight, per day. The treated group experienced reductions in infection rate, length of hospital stay and overall cost in medical care. Intravenous administration can always normalize plasma glutamine concentrations for intensive care unit patients. Oral administration is less conclusive in clinical settings.

    Glutamine is a major contributor toward healthy immune system functioning, where it is used as an oxidative substrate in cells. It has been shown to increase growth hormone production, a powerful messenger for stimulating repair and growth in the human body. Depleted blood glutamine is one marker for diagnosing overtraining syndrome and an athlete’s risk for developing upper respiratory tract infections. Shortages of glutamine can cause athletes to suffer from overtraining syndrome and increase their likeliness of infections.

    Similar to the immune system, glutamine is also a major fuel for cells lining the small intestine. Supplementation can help sooth stomach irritation and promote a healthy balance of bacteria in the digestive tract. Furthermore, glutamine can help lower levels of interleukin-8, an indicator of inflammation, in the lower intestine – if sufficient amounts are ingested in order to reach the area. Glutamine is considered essential for intestinal health.

    Some literature suggests that ingesting glutamine can beneficially influence insulin action, glucose disposal and fat oxidation – with potential for treating insulin resistance. In a 2006 study, researchers found improved insulin sensitivity in multiple trauma patients receiving 0.4 grams of glutamine per kilogram, per day. This is good news for bodybuilders using glutamine while trying to control glucose during fat-loss programs. There is evidence that consuming protein and glutamine will result in more efficient glycogen uptake than consumption of a pure carbohydrate meal alone.

    Glutamine does penetrate the blood-brain barrier. It has been used in alcoholism clinics to decrease cravings for alcohol. Glutamine has also been reported to decrease sugar cravings.

    In 2007, the Society of Critical Care Medicine published a paper reviewing nearly 40 studies and 30 years of research, called “Exogenous Glutamine – Compensating a shortage?” Researchers concluded that “all pieces of information fit the hypothesis of an increased need for glutamine during severe metabolic stress.” Normal concentrations of glutamine are required for the body to fight off infections and traumatic stress. Dietary glutamine is required for the body to maintain normal levels. Strength and endurance athletes, undergoing exhaustive training, are likely to benefit from augmenting their food intake with glutamine supplements.

    Charles Poliquin, a prominent authority in strength training, is well-known for recommending glutamine to his athletes. For some, he has reportedly suggested to consume “as much glutamine as you can afford.” In an interview with Zach Marcy, he stated: “Recent scientific research has demonstrated that consuming glutamine following exercise can accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis and glutamine levels, which are critical in the prevention of overtraining, and the creation of an anabolic environment. I recommend ingesting 0.33 grams per kilogram; so for a 90 kilogram man, that would be 30 grams. If someone has a higher percentage body fat, I up the glutamine and reduce the carbs.”

    In a 2005 interview with Poliquin, William Llewellyn had him further explain how he prescribes the use of glutamine: “When a guy can’t gain weight, a quick cure is 80g of glutamine per day, for a few days. It helps them repair the gut lining so they can absorb food better. I actually like glutamine. I consider fat as anyone with more than 10 percent body fat. Until they get to 10 percent, I only use whey protein, glycine and glutamine post workout. If they get over 10 percent, we start using glutamine. No carbs if you are fat.”

    It’s important to note: glutamine generally has poor solubility in water and is sensitive to heat. Luckily, several glutamine products on the market have increased its ability to dissolve in water. Regardless of the product, keep it stored in cool environments. Since dietary glutamine is quickly absorbed in the first pass by the gut and liver, large doses may be required to expect an ergogenic effect.

    Although clinical studies do support glutamine supplementation in critically ill patients, many discredit its use as a performance-enhancing substance in healthy adults. Many athletes swear it’s useless – “a waste of a bodybuilder’s hard-earned money.” However, on the flip side, a lot of anecdotal evidence supports the use of glutamine as part of an intense bodybuilding program – from recreational bodybuilders to experienced strength coaches. It may be accurate to suggest glutamine is most helpful during extreme training that flirts with overtraining conditions. More clinical research is needed to examine the effects of exogenous glutamine use in heavily trained subjects, to include those training while restricting energy intake or adhering to specific macronutrient ratios.
    All posts are for entertainment and may contain fiction. Consult a doctor before using any medication.


  5. #56

  6. #57

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    heavyiron great post. I love poliquin and dont know why i didnt refer back to him when thinking about glutamine. And the gut health thing is 100% true for me cause after a few days on empty stomache b/w meals i can tell a difference. sweetness

  7. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by natron View Post
    nope, I use whey isolate.

    dextrose is a sugar, not an amino acid..or at least it is not listed on an amino acid chart...not that i'm an expert on either....

    http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembo...structure.html

    and when i asked if you took BCAAs, you said no...i take whey isolate?

    more info on glutamine

    GLUTAMINE
    Non-Essential - Proteogenic - Glycogenic
    Un-charged, Hydrophilic - Amidic Main Functions:
    Precursor to the neurotransmitter GABA. This is a vital function, as GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that produces serenity and relaxation.
    Important glycogenic amino acid, meaning that it is essential for helping to maintain normal and steady blood sugar levels.
    Involved with muscle strength and indurance.
    Essential to gastrointestinal function; provides energy to the small intestines. The intestines are the only organ in the body that uses Glutamine as its primary source of energy.
    Glutamine has the highest blood concentration of all the amino acids.
    Precursor to the neurotransmitter amino acid Glutamate (Glutamic Acid).
    Involved in DNA synthesis.
    Glutamine Deficiency Seen In:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Alcoholism
    Anxiety and Panic Disorders
    Glutamine Excess Seen In:
    Use of some anti-convulsant medications.

    k....done with the debate....

  8. #59
    Spotter Berto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavyiron View Post
    An article written by Warrior;

    Glutamine for muscle growth and fat loss
    http://www.warriorfx.com/2008/06/glu...-and-fat-loss/
    June 01st, 2008
    I use glutamine on an empty stomach 2x a day (first thing in the morning and post-workout), and haven't had even a sniffle since I started using it. But I also eat very healthy and rarely get sick as it is.

    Anyway, studies show that GLUTAMINE DOES NOT BUILD MUSCLE, at least in most people. You might be different so try it out, but here's some sources to consider:


    PricePlow Founder
    www.PricePlow.com - Supplement Price Comparisons

  9. #60

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    Thanks for posting that Heavyiron. The funny thing about the age-old glutamine debate is how subscribed people can become to one idea... either "Glutamine is totally 100 percent worthless" or "I take it everyday and love it." But appropriately prescribing glutamine is not a black-and-white issue...

    Fact is, as I wrote in the final paragraph in the above review, glutamine is likely to be of most benefit to those who really push themselves. As stated: "It may be accurate to suggest glutamine is most helpful during extreme training that flirts with overtraining conditions."

    If your training to simply maintain musculature or embarked on a strength program employing long rest intervals with a diet that provides a balanced mix of all macros using a caloric surplus, then you're likely to see less of a benefit from exogenous use.

    However, if your sweatin' your ass off trying to lose fat, training in a caloric deficit, eating an acidic diet and performing a lot of cardio - try it, you might report a benefit. But remember, it's not as simple as ingesting two grams in the morning... you need a nice hefty allotment, especially right after training.

  10. #61
    Mass Monster Walking Beast's Avatar
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    Ive never figured out if it works. Then again I only do 10-15 grams a day in my shakes at the most. I take it anyway, but maybe I need to take higher dose. Id rather spend my money on pre-workout supplements or more food though. Glutamine also fucks with my stomach if I take too much.

  11. #62
    Spotter AESIRIAN's Avatar
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    I use 10mg 3x day. In the morning, post-workout, @ bedtime. I train extremely hvy with short breaks. I also have a very stressful job with 12 hr shifts in ICU/ER.
    So I'm doing it to cover my bases, I'm definitly in the "Gray Zone" on this, but its cheap.
    What have you done today to insure your success tomorrow?!

  12. #63
    Beach Body LotusMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natron View Post
    Blind faith my son.
    Hi Natron, you sure you're not confusing glutamine with glutamic acid? Glutamic acid, an amino as well, will raise your blood glucose.

  13. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by LotusMan View Post
    Hi Natron, you sure you're not confusing glutamine with glutamic acid? Glutamic acid, an amino as well, will raise your blood glucose.
    No, I'm not an idiot. I'm an R.N.C.P. by trade, not a bro-scientist.

  14. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by shockwayve3000 View Post
    dextrose is a sugar, not an amino acid..or at least it is not listed on an amino acid chart...not that i'm an expert on either....

    http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/561aminostructure.html

    and when i asked if you took BCAAs, you said no...i take whey isolate?

    more info on glutamine

    GLUTAMINE
    Non-Essential - Proteogenic - Glycogenic
    Un-charged, Hydrophilic - Amidic Main Functions:
    Precursor to the neurotransmitter GABA. This is a vital function, as GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that produces serenity and relaxation.
    Important glycogenic amino acid, meaning that it is essential for helping to maintain normal and steady blood sugar levels.
    Involved with muscle strength and indurance.
    Essential to gastrointestinal function; provides energy to the small intestines. The intestines are the only organ in the body that uses Glutamine as its primary source of energy.
    Glutamine has the highest blood concentration of all the amino acids.
    Precursor to the neurotransmitter amino acid Glutamate (Glutamic Acid).
    Involved in DNA synthesis.
    Glutamine Deficiency Seen In:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Alcoholism
    Anxiety and Panic Disorders
    Glutamine Excess Seen In:
    Use of some anti-convulsant medications.

    k....done with the debate....
    Yes dextrose is a sugar, glutamine is an amino acid. What you are missing is via glucogenesis, glutamine is converted into a sugar.

    I don't take BCAA's, I get enough amino acids from whey isolate. Efficiency and cost effectiveness are where it's at.

  15. #66
    Beach Body LotusMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natron View Post
    No, I'm not an idiot. I'm an R.N.C.P. by trade, not a bro-scientist.
    Never said you were, bro!

  16. #67

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    How can you guys take L-Glutamine post-workout (shake). Don't you need Glutamine Peptides in order to mix it in?

    What if you don't take peptides, then how would you take regular L-Glutamine regularly, before breakfast, a lunch? and before sleep after a casein drink or so?

    Thnx

  17. #68
    Beach Body
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    Quote Originally Posted by jj2006 View Post
    How can you guys take L-Glutamine post-workout (shake). Don't you need Glutamine Peptides in order to mix it in?

    What if you don't take peptides, then how would you take regular L-Glutamine regularly, before breakfast, a lunch? and before sleep after a casein drink or so?

    Thnx
    If you read the above posts,you'll find your answers as quite a few have stated what they do,like first thing in morning,pwo,before bed etc.

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