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Thread: Are Decline Presses Better Than Incline Presses?

  1. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by pesty4077 View Post
    Best devolement for mey chest came from weighted dips.
    Same here, I would do dips over declines.

  2. #19
    Titan YukonCrazy's Avatar
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    I read in MD years ago that decline bench stresses the chest the same as a flat bench press would.

    No advantage to decline pressing over Incline pressing, IMO.

    Inclines however stressed and stimulated the chest the most out of all 3 movements.
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  3. #20
    Iron Addict Nuke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Beast View Post
    Going by feel and how Ive grown over the years, I believe that inclines are the ultimate chest exercise. If I could only choose one exercise for chest development Id choose incline presses.

    I havent done declines in over 10 years probably, so I would really need to try them again, though I doubt my mind would change. With inclines my upper chest cramps and twitches painfully after the session, and the rest of my chest is just as sore as with flat bench presses. So I feel incline targets more overall muscle on the chest. For me atleast.

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  4. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pesty4077 View Post
    Best devolement for mey chest came from weighted dips.
    Hell yeah, I love weighted dips. Chains or a belt with plates, they both rock!!

  5. #22
    Mass Monster Walking Beast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuke View Post
    Do you have measurements to back that up or are you just going off of what you see in the mirror?
    Goinig by how the muscle feels after inclines and by improvements Ive seen in upper chest when prioritizing inclines for a while. I dont really know how to measure just the upper chest though. When I measure chest its under the armpits, all the way around, like usually done.

    My upper chest cramps and twitches violently sometimes after inclines, dont feel that at all on flat bench days. Just muscle lock ups in mid and lower chest.

    I havent done declines in a long time though. So I would have to try them again

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  6. #23
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    Obviously more then 90% of people's chests are lacking in the upper portion of their chest. Yes, I did declines for over a year and a half (2 and a half years running time for the gym) and they were my favourite. I could do the most weight and I felt it the most. Although I could not do one dip.

    The day came to where I could do dips for reps, and felt my chest a hundred times better and opted out declines. I have never turned back since.

    The ROM is the same as bench press, incline, and declines. But i think it is just that on declines your legs are higher then your torso, or your center of gravity shifts, so you can pump out more weight, while your lower chest is stronger.

    Maybe they are trying to group inclines and flat bench together because a lot of people arch their back when doing inclines. Although this isn't the wrong thing, but an incline and turn close to bench with a heavily arched back. That's why i throw it up a notch and arch slightly.

    Weighted dips > Declines

    Why not do both?? well go ahead, but the debate is what is better inclines or declines, I believe inclines is a lot better for you in the upper portion of your chest that most people are lacking.

  7. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartacus View Post
    In most cases inclines are the superior chest movement due to a significant increase in rom. .
    Probably the greatest myth perpetrated, is that a full range of motion is best for muscle growth. There are some studies demonstrating that a partial movement of the rep done at the semi-streched position and keeping the tension continuous is more beneficial than a rep through a full range of motion. In many movements the full ROM actually works the assisting muscles more so than the target muscle. In the worse case, like Bench and Incline Bench the Full ROM, especially the lower part of the movement puts the body in some dangerous biomechanical postions.

    Declines, seem to actually target the chest better than the flat and Incline as it does reduce the ROM, but keeps that motion focused on the chest muscles.

  8. #25

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    I still do declines either using a hammer machine or dumbbells and I do decline flyes I still feel the need to do Upper flat and declines I feel that works the whole chest throw in some flyes or cables and you got the whole chest done

  9. #26
    thebeast23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuke View Post
    In the last several days I have read multiple articles on training chest referencing a study by Glass, et. al. which stated that clavicular/sternal, lower/middle portions of the pectoralis major is activated the same when performing decline bench presses as they are when performing incline bench presses. Furthermore, this study is said to state that a larger portion of the overall chest muscle is stimulated during declines.

    These articles also cite a study by Barnett, et al. which found the upper region of the chest was no more stimulated in incline presses than in flat bench presses. The argument that declines are healthier for your shoulders than inclines because inclines place your shoulder in a compromised position.

    These articles use these studies to suggest that flat bench presses and declines should be the primary exercises in a chest program.

    Thoughts, experiences, or anyone actually know what these studies are (contrary to MD these rags don't print their references - they are available upon request)?
    well what ever you do....just make sure your reason for doing decline is because you can handle alot of weight......oh and there is no "secret" exercise that will magically trigger growth

  10. #27
    Spotter Okinawa_Power's Avatar
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    The ROM on declines is so small that I don't see it being a benefit for overall mass production.......Where the Incline stimulates more muscles which in turn will increase your chest........
    "Make Pain a Friend, and you will have a Friend for Life"

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx666 View Post
    I wrote this thread for another site. its a good starting point for a beginner but there may be infromation that could help you. the information isn't incline, flat or decline specfice unless you consider the feet position may not apply to decline.

    Bench press, the common dingle berry of society considers it to be the judge and jury to determine an individual’s strength. While others and myself will disagree with such urban rules the bench press by far is the most popular and practiced exercise in most gyms. It is considered that every Monday across the globe is “bench day.” Thus in honor of the bench press I will try to explain good solid technique ranging from grip, form and ROM.


    There is more than one way to actually lay down on the bench a traditional method or power lifting. The difference is:
    • Leg position
    • Feet position
    • Arching the lower back

    Traditional your legs are approximately making a 90 degree bend and are out in front of the bench while a power lifting leg position the legs are bent at a more acute angle than 90 degree. This more acute angle causes the quad muscle to stretch and “load.” This stretch will allow the lifting to tighten the lower body and actually use this “loaded” stretch to help drive the weight off of their chest. The acute angle also causes the lower back to lift off the bench which is referred to as an “arch.” The arch is beneficial because it forces the upper back and shoulder girdle to lay flat on the bench giving the lifter a solid foundation such that the load of the weights will firmly plant the lifters shoulder blades into the pad of the bench.

    Contracting the traps and lats is part of the traditional and power lifting set up. By contracting these muscles you securing the shoulder joint into its socket. This keeps the shoulder in place and restrains the shoulders from rising up in a horizontal or vertical direction towards the lifters head which could cause shoulder injury/dislocation.

    Trap “tucking” and contraction help. It is helpful to have a firm contraction of the traps, by extending your arms and using the pillars to the bench to push/tuck the scapula-shoulder blades the lifter can achieve a much firmer trap contraction which will provide a firmer shoulder girdle foundation.

    Elbow position is another critical piece of benching. Because your shoulder joint rotates, hence why people get rotator cuff injuries, by keeping your elbows in close this allows the shoulder to rotate. The further away your elbow is away from your torso the more it begins to hinge, this will result in a shoulder injury over time. Also, the synergy of the shoulder and elbow joint are greatest when the elbow is close to the body, as the elbow travels away from the body the weaker the synergy of the this compound movement; its a simple fact that the closer your elbow gets to your head the weaker your entire arm will become.

    Your grip is another area; try this to figure out your best grip. Stand up with your arms held out to your sides make a fist and your palms are facing the floor so your body makes a "T" *pretend your in the village people for a second* pull your shoulders back by flexing your traps and pull your shoulders down by flexing your lats. try to contract your chest, as you can tell its damn near impossible, now slowly bring your fists closer together, keep your elbows locked and keep trying to contract your pecs. As you your fists get closer you will notice your pecs start to contract harder, they will be contracted the hardest right about at shoulder width. A wider grip doesn’t mean you’ll grow a wider chest. However a wider grip can be utilized as long as form is not compromised. Remember to squeeze your lats as you lower the bar, this helps to keep your elbows as close to your torso as possible. There is a potential benefit to a wider grip however most people really won’t notice a difference since its dependent on body structure. Widening your grip will roll the shoulder joint in a way that you could possibly get a harder stretch at the bottom position. It could also potentially help keep the traps contracted and the scapula tucked under the shoulder girdle.

    ROM is the final key point in benching successfully. If proper form is being practice as stated above as you lower the weight the bar will end up somewhere between your sternum and navel. As you press upwards the bar can be pushed straight up or on an arch so that the bar travels from the abdomin to a position above the lifters head. How low the bar travels is key. The two major components of building muscle utilizing a bench press is muscle stretch and muscle contraction. The lower the bar travels in a controlled motion will continuously make the pecs stretch, thus you want to lower the bar into your torso as far as possible such that the bar slightly touches you in the lower position. This will stretch the pecs to their maximum potential for this lift. The other part is the muscle contraction which is accomplished by pressing the bar up to your maximum extension. It is up to you to decide if you wish to lock out your elbows or not. Contrary to mixed information which indicates this could be harsh on the elbow joint but yet it could spur new bone growth due to the shock endured by the skeleton, it’s a debate for another thread.


    RECAP:
    • Body position is up the lifter, both positions will accomplish result but arguing which one is better is a huge waste of time.
    • Keep your traps contracted and your scapula tucked to protect your shoulders and provide a solid shoulder girdle foundation for the lift
    • If you flare your elbow you remove the shoulder joint out of its natural movement and make the shoulder move in a way it was not designed
    • If you flare your elbow the weaker the synergy of the compound movement because your arm will not be able to exert force through the hand as effectively
    • Flaring your elbows causes your shoulder joint to hinge more than rotate which directly puts stress on the rotator cuff which could lead to injury
    • Flaring your elbows puts more strain on your shoulders and triceps and isolates the pecs from the overall movement
    • Grip is up to the lifter and may or may not provide extra stretch stimulation
    • Do not left grip compromise form, do not flare your elbows
    • Use the fullest ROM as possible.
    • Do not compromise ROM because you are trying to move too much weight

    Watch this video, it is a starting point.

    <font face="Times New Roman"><font size="3"><font color="#0000ff">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c</font></font>[/FON</font>"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c[/FON
    [font=Times New Roman]

    If anybody is interested in Band or Chain information feel free to PM me.
    If you have any questions I’d be more than happy to help any of you out, just send me a PM.
    Great info

  12. #29
    Spotter BigRigBrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx666 View Post
    I wrote this thread for another site. its a good starting point for a beginner but there may be infromation that could help you. the information isn't incline, flat or decline specfice unless you consider the feet position may not apply to decline.

    Bench press, the common dingle berry of society considers it to be the judge and jury to determine an individual’s strength. While others and myself will disagree with such urban rules the bench press by far is the most popular and practiced exercise in most gyms. It is considered that every Monday across the globe is “bench day.” Thus in honor of the bench press I will try to explain good solid technique ranging from grip, form and ROM.


    There is more than one way to actually lay down on the bench a traditional method or power lifting. The difference is:
    • Leg position
    • Feet position
    • Arching the lower back

    Traditional your legs are approximately making a 90 degree bend and are out in front of the bench while a power lifting leg position the legs are bent at a more acute angle than 90 degree. This more acute angle causes the quad muscle to stretch and “load.” This stretch will allow the lifting to tighten the lower body and actually use this “loaded” stretch to help drive the weight off of their chest. The acute angle also causes the lower back to lift off the bench which is referred to as an “arch.” The arch is beneficial because it forces the upper back and shoulder girdle to lay flat on the bench giving the lifter a solid foundation such that the load of the weights will firmly plant the lifters shoulder blades into the pad of the bench.

    Contracting the traps and lats is part of the traditional and power lifting set up. By contracting these muscles you securing the shoulder joint into its socket. This keeps the shoulder in place and restrains the shoulders from rising up in a horizontal or vertical direction towards the lifters head which could cause shoulder injury/dislocation.

    Trap “tucking” and contraction help. It is helpful to have a firm contraction of the traps, by extending your arms and using the pillars to the bench to push/tuck the scapula-shoulder blades the lifter can achieve a much firmer trap contraction which will provide a firmer shoulder girdle foundation.

    Elbow position is another critical piece of benching. Because your shoulder joint rotates, hence why people get rotator cuff injuries, by keeping your elbows in close this allows the shoulder to rotate. The further away your elbow is away from your torso the more it begins to hinge, this will result in a shoulder injury over time. Also, the synergy of the shoulder and elbow joint are greatest when the elbow is close to the body, as the elbow travels away from the body the weaker the synergy of the this compound movement; its a simple fact that the closer your elbow gets to your head the weaker your entire arm will become.

    Your grip is another area; try this to figure out your best grip. Stand up with your arms held out to your sides make a fist and your palms are facing the floor so your body makes a "T" *pretend your in the village people for a second* pull your shoulders back by flexing your traps and pull your shoulders down by flexing your lats. try to contract your chest, as you can tell its damn near impossible, now slowly bring your fists closer together, keep your elbows locked and keep trying to contract your pecs. As you your fists get closer you will notice your pecs start to contract harder, they will be contracted the hardest right about at shoulder width. A wider grip doesn’t mean you’ll grow a wider chest. However a wider grip can be utilized as long as form is not compromised. Remember to squeeze your lats as you lower the bar, this helps to keep your elbows as close to your torso as possible. There is a potential benefit to a wider grip however most people really won’t notice a difference since its dependent on body structure. Widening your grip will roll the shoulder joint in a way that you could possibly get a harder stretch at the bottom position. It could also potentially help keep the traps contracted and the scapula tucked under the shoulder girdle.

    ROM is the final key point in benching successfully. If proper form is being practice as stated above as you lower the weight the bar will end up somewhere between your sternum and navel. As you press upwards the bar can be pushed straight up or on an arch so that the bar travels from the abdomin to a position above the lifters head. How low the bar travels is key. The two major components of building muscle utilizing a bench press is muscle stretch and muscle contraction. The lower the bar travels in a controlled motion will continuously make the pecs stretch, thus you want to lower the bar into your torso as far as possible such that the bar slightly touches you in the lower position. This will stretch the pecs to their maximum potential for this lift. The other part is the muscle contraction which is accomplished by pressing the bar up to your maximum extension. It is up to you to decide if you wish to lock out your elbows or not. Contrary to mixed information which indicates this could be harsh on the elbow joint but yet it could spur new bone growth due to the shock endured by the skeleton, it’s a debate for another thread.


    RECAP:
    • Body position is up the lifter, both positions will accomplish result but arguing which one is better is a huge waste of time.
    • Keep your traps contracted and your scapula tucked to protect your shoulders and provide a solid shoulder girdle foundation for the lift
    • If you flare your elbow you remove the shoulder joint out of its natural movement and make the shoulder move in a way it was not designed
    • If you flare your elbow the weaker the synergy of the compound movement because your arm will not be able to exert force through the hand as effectively
    • Flaring your elbows causes your shoulder joint to hinge more than rotate which directly puts stress on the rotator cuff which could lead to injury
    • Flaring your elbows puts more strain on your shoulders and triceps and isolates the pecs from the overall movement
    • Grip is up to the lifter and may or may not provide extra stretch stimulation
    • Do not left grip compromise form, do not flare your elbows
    • Use the fullest ROM as possible.
    • Do not compromise ROM because you are trying to move too much weight

    Watch this video, it is a starting point.

    <font face="Times New Roman"><font size="3"><font color="#0000ff">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c</font></font>[/FON</font>"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUcjOIZc80c[/FON
    [font=Times New Roman]

    If anybody is interested in Band or Chain information feel free to PM me.
    If you have any questions I’d be more than happy to help any of you out, just send me a PM.
    Great info here

  13. #30
    Spotter BigRigBrian's Avatar
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    oops! sorry bout the double post

  14. #31

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    i work my chest from top to bottom...i used to do flat then incline then decline but for 6 months now ive been working from top to bottom. I feel for me that has worked best for me.

  15. #32
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    Default Which is better?

    This is something that could possibly be debated back and forth forever each person standing on the back of some study or some 'experts' advice.

    I will only say this much. There are exercises that work better for my chest than others. There is a rep range that works best for my development of muscle fibers. There is a tempo and principles of training which work better for me than for someone else.

    All in all, muscular development is what you are after and how you get there doesn't really matter.

    A fully developed chest doesn't happen by accident but through carefully planned and executed workouts over time.

    MM66

  16. #33

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    If you really want to develop your upper chest, then incline is the only way to go!

  17. #34
    Dedicated Noob drind89's Avatar
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    we all know that declines incline and flat all work out diffrent parts of your chest. however i feel like my chest gets a better workout on decline than anything. it gives it that full effect

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