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Thread: How has age affected your training?

  1. #35

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    I'm going to be 39 soon myself. I've been lifting on and off for about 15 years, but really started to "know what I was doing" and put it together the past three years. Three years ago, I also lost a tremendous amount of weight.

    If there's one thing I notice, it's that I don't heal as quickly as I used to. I have lower back problems, and when I was heavier it would act up on me three or four times a year. Now it'll affect me maybe once a year. But when I hurt my back, It takes me about a week to ten days now to feel right again, wheras when I was younger, I'd be good to go in about four to five.

  2. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJP View Post
    Yeah, I started out years ago doing BTN presses and lat pulldowns. That was just what you did and you didn't question it. Luckily I didn't do permanent rotator cuff damage but for years I trained with pain and often could barely bench or do other presses. Once I dropped both, over time my rotator cuffs were completely pain free and for the most part have been ever since.

    Dropping straight bar curls was a factor of a horrible case of tendonitis I got about 7 years ago which got so bad at one point I barely trained bis directly for a little over a year. Once I got to the point where I could train relatively pain free, I only used DBs and warmed up for 2 or 3 sets with very light weight. I eventually got back to about 90% but dropped the straight bar. I say "90%" since to this day while nothing debilitating, I still feel something in the background reminding me it's still there if I want to try something stupid. Most of the time I listen

    It's funny you mention that. Since I've been floating around B.B.ing forums for the past 6 mths or so, It's seeming more and more obvious to me just how big of a risk category for long term if not ' permanent ' for being left untended damage that so many ppl are experiencing through a similar biomechanic. I be;ieve alot of it is coming from whether or not ppl are balancing super and pro nations in heavier lifting exercises and whther or not they're doing something to counteract the hyper state of spine alingment through other sympathetic exercises after the initial heavy load.
    This predicament is seeming soo common and expressing itself in so many different connective tissue and nerve and joint issues that are putting ppl in long term training comprimise and daily discomfort.
    It's really nice to hear that you've had some success in taking a nice slow rehab.. It's a shame there's not more of it for others.

  3. #37
    Amateur Threat WillBrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammiesdad View Post
    Hello, my name is David, and this is my first post here

    I've been lifting weights, off and on, since I was 16 years old. I'm now 52. As I've gotten older, and most significantly in the last five years or so, I've had to make adjustments to compensate for age related changes,

    1) I injure more easily, and heal more slowly. I have to pay much more attention to strict form and careful lifting.
    2) I use rotator cuff and lower back strengthening and stretching routines to minimize injury.
    3) I need more volume...more sets per muscle group...to make any gains.
    4) I need more recovery time.
    5) I no longer tolerate long sessions in the gym. I need to get out well under one hour.
    5) With 3, 4, and 5, above, in mind, I use a four way split...legs, back, chest/shoulders, arms...which allows me sufficient time to get the required volume in under an hour, and I cycle the split once per week, which gives me sufficient recovery time. I wouldn't be surprised if in another decade, I need 10-14 days to recover.
    6) I pay closer attention to pre, intra, and post workout nutrition, to aid recovery.
    7) I no longer give unsolicited advice in the gym. Young guys thing the old guy can't possibly know anything, and they don't like it when their girlfriends ask them why the old guy is bigger and more muscular than they are

    Will Brink told me this was a good forum and that I should give it a try. But, where are the dog and gun threads? Can't have a good forum without dog and gun threads. Really, that would be...absurd.

    David
    Well I am the same in all but 4. I feel I actually need less volume, but more frequency. Right now I am doing something of a hybrid, which is an upper lower split with a whole body, like upper Mon, Lower Wed, whole body Fri. That allows each major bodypart to get hit twice per week but the volume per workout is kept lower. Try to get some aerobic work on the Tue, Thurs, and maybe Sat, but not if I have to shoot an IDPA match! There's your damn gun reference.

    PS, tried to buy www.GunsAndDogs.com but it was taken...
    Will Brink @ www.BrinkZone.com

  4. #38
    Atlas Tatyana's Avatar
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    Hey all,

    I am really interested in people being well and healthy for their entire lifespan.

    There is a huge mass of research being done on resistance training/weight training in older people.

    Being that I am standing for well-being for all people, I do have a game plan, and bodybuilding, and competing in it is one of the expressions of this.

    I have very strong convictions that strength training is one of the biggest missings in people's health right now.

    The number one killer of older women is complications from osteoporosis, ususally from pathological fractures from falls.

    I remember reading something in the BMJ (British Medical Journal) that stated one thing that would decrease the number of falls in the elderly is weight training. It is the muscle that stabilises the joints.

    This is just one of the many papers I have found, I will post up more abstracts or PDF files as I find really interesting ones.

    I work as a biomedical scientist in a pathology lab for the National Health Service in England. This next year I will be completing my Master's degree in Clinical Biochemistry, and my project in on macro creatine kinase (also muscle related).

    I am a complete science boffin, and I love molecular biology, it really rocks my world that the molecular pathways for how muscle grows are finally being described.






    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2000 Nov;55(11):M641-8.

    Effects of age, gender, and myostatin genotype on the hypertrophic response to heavy resistance strength training.

    Ivey FM, Roth SM, Ferrell RE, Tracy BL, Lemmer JT, Hurlbut DE, Martel GF, Siegel EL, Fozard JL, Jeffrey Metter E, Fleg JL, Hurley BF.

    Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Maryland College Park 20742, USA.

    BACKGROUND: Because of the scarcity of data available from direct comparisons of age and gender groups using the same relative training stimulus, it is unknown whether older individuals can increase their muscle mass as much as young individuals and whether women can increase as much as men in response to strength training (ST). In addition, little is known about whether the hypertrophic response to ST is affected by myostatin genotype, a candidate gene for muscle hypertrophy.

    METHODS: Eleven young men (25 +/- 3 years, range 21-29 years), 11 young women (26 +/- 2 years, range 23-28 years), 12 older men (69 +/- 3 years, range 65-75 years), and 11 older women (68 +/- 2 years, range 65-73 years) had bilateral quadriceps muscle volume measurements performed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after ST and detraining. Training consisted of knee extension exercises of the dominant leg three times per week for 9 weeks. The contralateral limb was left untrained throughout the ST program. Following the unilateral training period, the subjects underwent 31 weeks of detraining during which no regular exercise was performed. Myostatin genotype was determined in a subgroup of 32 subjects, of which five female subjects were carriers of a myostatin gene variant.

    RESULTS: A significantly greater absolute increase in muscle volume was observed in men than in women (204 +/- 20 vs 101 +/- 13 cm3, p < .01), but there was no significant difference in muscle volume response to ST between young and older individuals. The gender effect remained after adjusting for baseline muscle volume. In addition, there was a significantly greater loss of absolute muscle volume after 31 weeks of detraining in men than in women (151 +/- 13 vs 88 +/- 7 cm3, p < .05), but no significant difference between young and older individuals.

    Myostatin genotype did not explain the hypertrophic response to ST when all 32 subjects were assessed. However, when only women were analyzed, those with the less common myostatin allele exhibited a 68% larger increase in muscle volume in response to ST (p = .056).

    CONCLUSIONS: Aging does not affect the muscle mass response to either ST or detraining, whereas gender does, as men increased their muscle volume about twice as much in response to ST as did women and experienced larger losses in response to detraining than women. Young men were the only group that maintained muscle volume adaptation after 31 weeks of detraining. Although myostatin genotype may not explain the observed gender difference in the hypertrophic response to ST, a role for myostatin genotype may be indicated in this regard for women, but future studies are needed with larger subject numbers in each genotype group to confirm this observation.

    This is really interesting, so age has no bearing on how much muscle you can grow, however, stopping training has a bigger impact on older men, and less of an impact on younger men.

    Men grow more muscle than women (surprise surprise), however they lose more muscle when they stop training (JOY!).

    It also appears that variations in the myostatin gene (or polymorphisms) have more of an effect on women than men (JOY!)

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  5. #39
    Atlas Tatyana's Avatar
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    One of the reasons I LOVE Muscular Development mag is that is does review all the recent scientific literature.

    I am sure I read this in one of the reviews........................

    You don't have to go heavy to build muscle, high volume training (higher reps) work just as well.

    This is great news for those who have been injured, those who have to watch their joints, those that are dieting and don't have the energy to push out big weights, and for the older athlete



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  6. #40
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    I really like your philosophy and focusses with this.

    i think that between the postural and bone and joint strength that comes from resisted strength training, down to organ and nerve line performance and position because of those things, and the creatine and amino profile sympatheic to microcellular gusto and it's efficiacy - that is it in a complete nutshell.

    Btw, are you saying that in elder ppl to restore muscle mass via myostatin inhibition that would be subjective to natural HGRH synthesis because of it's effect in cellular rejuvination as the older cells die? I quite live and treat and advise ppl off much the same theory. . for illness or for fitness projects and goals.. or rehab and long term wellness. it iis my personal hermenuetic.

    I'm enrolled in a master of physiology / high ( elite) performance sport and exercise science myself over other things i neearly did instead and may or may not pick up later and so with so many enticing academic fields relative to this and health for life ideals , i wish you all the best in your future studies and what it reaps.

    Thanks for the hi article.

    Blooming tianshi lotus.
    Last edited by Blooming lotus; August 23rd, 2007 at 09:11 PM.

  7. #41
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    p.s. really love your dietary research efforts attack plan and am a big fan of the same variable influence on all of those factors.

    chees again.

    Blooming Lotus.

  8. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Well I am the same in all but 4.
    Too polite to point out that I had two #5s?
    I feel I actually need less volume, but more frequency. Right now I am doing something of a hybrid, which is an upper lower split with a whole body, like upper Mon, Lower Wed, whole body Fri. That allows each major bodypart to get hit twice per week but the volume per workout is kept lower.
    Hmmm...interesting. I may have to try that split.
    Try to get some aerobic work on the Tue, Thurs, and maybe Sat, but not if I have to shoot an IDPA match! There's your damn gun reference.
    Thank you! In related news...as knives are related to guns and dogs...I now own a knife 50% more expensive than my most expensive gun:

    http://www.knifeart.com/tacmatoandda.html

    That's $1800 that my Vegas strippers won't be getting.
    PS, tried to buy www.GunsAndDogs.com but it was taken...
    That would be

    David

  9. #43
    Pit Leader villan's Avatar
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    i need more synthol as i get older

  10. #44
    Atlas Tatyana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blooming lotus View Post
    I really like your philosophy and focusses with this.

    i think that between the postural and bone and joint strength that comes from resisted strength training, down to organ and nerve line performance and position because of those things, and the creatine and amino profile sympatheic to microcellular gusto and it's efficiacy - that is it in a complete nutshell.

    Btw, are you saying that in elder ppl to restore muscle mass via myostatin inhibition that would be subjective to natural HGRH synthesis because of it's effect in cellular rejuvination as the older cells die? I quite live and treat and advise ppl off much the same theory. . for illness or for fitness projects and goals.. or rehab and long term wellness. it iis my personal hermenuetic.

    I'm enrolled in a master of physiology / high ( elite) performance sport and exercise science myself over other things i neearly did instead and may or may not pick up later and so with so many enticing academic fields relative to this and health for life ideals , i wish you all the best in your future studies and what it reaps.

    Thanks for the hi article.

    Blooming tianshi lotus.
    COOL, I love physiology, you can't do biochemistry properly without physiology, and I have discovered that bodybuilding really is applied physiology and biochem.

    I am considering doing a master's in sports psychology/nutrition, as it is fantastic having all this knowledge about well-being, it is just GETTING PEOPLE to take it on.

    You know how studies in science go, in particular those with human subjects. The groups are small, and, often only one parameter, really is varied.

    I also have seen a number of papers on giving people growth hormone, which has also had numerous benefits (and a few side effects).

    I am a natural bodybuilder, so I do look for the 'alternative' to pharmaceuticals.

    This is the interesting thing with growth hormone, it does decrease with age. But what is decreasing, as far as we can tell right now, is it's release, not its synthesis.

    Obviously, if our somatotrophs still make the same amount of GH as we age, it can be released, as the human body is highly 'lazy' and evolution does allow any processes that require extra effort or engery to persist.

    There are a number of things that have been suggested to trigger the release of GH, such as lower calorie intake (starvation as well), intense physical activity, sleep, and then there are a few nutritional things, like some amino acids (if my memory serves me correctly arginine and erm, phenylalanine in particular).

    This is a big issue, well-being well into life. I work in hospital, and the impact of people not taking care of their bodies, well, I see those people in the corridors, in the clinical details sent to the labs, in their blood results.

    Personally, I think it is tragic to see someone with full mental faculties trapped in a body that is failing, or the reverse.

    There are so many ways to avoid cognitive and physical decline to remain active and well into old age.

    As my consultant put it "Exercise may wear out a joint, you probably will have more aches and pains, but it is easier to replace a joint than a heart'


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  11. #45
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    hhmmm.. it does seem to be one of those topics.

    I quite get a bit excited about bio-med myself though. I was thaat close to the masters in that just to play with all the cool equipment you guys get .

    That and tossing around some pharmecuetical math along the samish lines as we're talking about now actually.

    I plan to take my master into a ph.d in education syllabus and curriculum construction for much the same reasons. That's why i'll be in the U.S. and hopefully able to compete.

    I wont go on because that's not what the thread's for but from what you're quoting up there, particularly in relation to the phenylalanine you mentioned that has tyronsine as it's active target and works in cnjunction with the argine, it seems pretty clear imo that the release mechanism of the GH and the abily to maintain that mechanism comes down to whether or not the amino spectrum has enough presence and communication terms for that to happen.
    I think that the creatine could play a big role in that myself.
    Because I eat so much protein, aside from the aminos I get from other sources - and the source type pending when i want it to metabolise and upload - I catabolise my proteins with dry red wine and take an additional tyrosine and taurine along with some less immediately bio-available protein sources. Potassium seems to play a reasonable part in my mind aswell. .. maybe for thermal regulation sakes relative to the processes .. particularly
    pituitary cooling. . overtraining and thaat is something else i'm looking at. That powerlifter death really drove home to me importance of educating about that. . and that is what I believe happened. I albeit experienced the same thing myself as a conscious trade off decision on a temp heavy lifting work gig. I'm glad I got through it. I should nearly 've been wondering. Insane .
    I can't tell you the joy and health and vitality I get from eating like that though. I 'd love more ppl to know how to put the same chem together for themselves and their families to experience some of what we do. . and ideally through what they might swing on low income tables if I can put it together for them.
    So many ways to go or be broke . Seeing them not be able to afford to take care.. let alone work out and fuel it,.. and that's if they know how to at all, ( .. which most ppl imo do not ; ) that quite catches my attention.

    Anyway, hi again and good luck with your projects and your competitions.

    Blooming tianshi lotus.
    Last edited by Blooming lotus; August 24th, 2007 at 07:26 AM.

  12. #46
    Amateur Threat WillBrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammiesdad View Post
    Too polite to point out that I had two #5s?
    More like too stupid to notice.


    Quote Originally Posted by sammiesdad View Post
    Hmmm...interesting. I may have to try that split.Thank you!
    Actually it's a spin off from a program I recently developed I call Brink's Hybrid System which has been very popular with those who have tried it from my forums and it had very pos effects on bodycomp and strength for me also. The above is a watered down version of a much more extensive program.

    Quote Originally Posted by sammiesdad View Post
    In related news...as knives are related to guns and dogs...I now own a knife 50% more expensive than my most expensive gun:

    http://www.knifeart.com/tacmatoandda.html

    That's $1800 that my Vegas strippers won't be getting.That would be

    David
    Very pretty. Don't know what the hell you will do with such a knife other than look at it, but it sure is pretty. I love good guns and knives, but for me they all have to be functional in the collection. For example, I sold that big Trident knife as it never gets used. I did order a smaller version, which I am still waiting to get.
    Will Brink @ www.BrinkZone.com

  13. #47
    Amateur Threat WillBrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tatyana View Post
    Hey all,

    I am really interested in people being well and healthy for their entire lifespan.

    There is a huge mass of research being done on resistance training/weight training in older people.
    My article on sarcopenia should be if some use/interest:

    http://www.brinkzone.com/articledeta...d=101&acatid=3
    Will Brink @ www.BrinkZone.com

  14. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillBrink View Post
    Very pretty. Don't know what the hell you will do with such a knife other than look at it, but it sure is pretty. I love good guns and knives, but for me they all have to be functional in the collection. For example, I sold that big Trident knife as it never gets used. I did order a smaller version, which I am still waiting to get.
    Oh, it's functional. I do not collect non-functional knives nor replica firearms. That knife is built as ruggedly and would function as reliably as any knife there is. Only difference is, it will NEVER be used. It is art in the form of a knife.

    David

  15. #49
    Amateur Threat WillBrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammiesdad View Post
    Oh, it's functional. I do not collect non-functional knives nor replica firearms. That knife is built as ruggedly and would function as reliably as any knife there is. Only difference is, it will NEVER be used. It is art in the form of a knife.

    David

    I didn't mean functional as in it will not function as a knife, I meant functional in that you will never use it, thus it does not "function" in the collection other than to sit there and look pretty. It is art no doubt, and very pretty agreed.

    PS, you saw my CC response on the mfw-moderated idea. No one responded. I did get the info on how to go about it via Google news groups. Looks pretty simple from what I gathered.
    Last edited by WillBrink; August 24th, 2007 at 12:09 PM.
    Will Brink @ www.BrinkZone.com

  16. #50
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    Additional to what i've already posted on this thread, the older I get, the more I find myself prepared to push limits and come not only clinically allow myself the worse and worse condition each time I bench it to go back for notes or this or that in other aspects of my life, but the stronger and smarter I find myself coming back and the harder I get to work for it . . or smarter as the case may be. I love the challenge of putting myself into a comeback mode.

    Blooming tianshi lotus.

  17. #51
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    I'm 40 and will be competing in my first show next year, but have been in the gym most of my life. The biggest change for me is how much I need to worm up my joints. I have always liked lifting heavy, and I also boxed as an armature for 15 years. It has taken it's tole on my joints. I don't like to run outside on the pavement anymore, and it takes me 15-20 min to worm up before my training begins.

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