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Hyperice - HYPERSPHERE Vibrating Fitness Ball broken?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by bluecountry View Post
    Thanks man. What a waste and everything that is wrong with modern day society/economics. Fix it first is my goal but yea it sounds like that is not practical.

    To be clear I don’t have a business, it’s just me using this device, and when I go 3-4 weeks without using it I begin to get the aches. So this is important.

    I can use it still, the rattling is distracting especially in public, but sounds like I should replace. I got this in 20-9, has quality improved? Are there better brands?
    This was my first and only time looking at these hypersheres.
    All I can advise it spend the $60 and get a new one on amazon.com
    I saw a star, reached for it...and MISSED

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Howard View Post

      It's the use of digital technology which is a lot cheaper to make the actual product.
      For example, my dad bought our 1st color TV back 55 years ago .
      It was a big , clunky console model that had a big picture tube . It came with 2 big speakers inside and the actual screen was around 17-18" diagonal .

      I helped hold the ladder when he climbed up on the roof to set up the antenna .
      We got 3 network channels plus PBS and you had to adjust the color after it was turned on.
      You got red, blue and green intersecting circles on the screen. You adjusted the color knobs until you got 'white' in the middle.

      I remember this costing my dad around $500 , which would be aprox $4400 today! * checked on inflation indicator /chart.

      Today, you can get a BETTER plasma TV with a 40-44" screen for about $250 or aprox $30 in 1966.

      Electronics are just a fraction of their cost from back in the day.

      It's NOT a conspiracy, it's advances in technology and economics 101.
      There is nothing economical in throwing away a whole product when what fails is a part of it.

      That has never happened in the history of mankind, and modern technological gadgets would be easily repairable if designers and engineers made it that way.

      We can go to Mars, create millions of vaccines in 5 months ... but we cannot make products that do not spoil when in the past we had less knowledge and the products lasted a lifetime? What kind of idiot must you be not to see this?

      There is a very good movie called "The Man in the White Suit", it is from 1950, at that time the problem of planned obsolescence was already appearing, that is, designing products that break down or that cannot be repaired when there is knowledge to make products more durable. This system was not attractive because neither the employers nor the employees wanted to cut their earnings or lose their jobs.

      As a result, we have a financial and labor system that does not take into account the sustainability of resources or the waste generated.

      The conspiracy is about people meeting and planning on something, this has nothing to do, it just has to do with making money. Although in a way, everything was made of poorer quality, the warranties were lowered and there created advertising to exchange products just for fashion although they were still perfectly functional ... yes, this can be called conspiracy, I don't know, but's not the point either.
      Last edited by Beti ona; January 6, 2022, 08:31 AM.
      http://betionastore.es/

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Beti ona View Post
        There is nothing economical in throwing away a whole product when what fails is a part of it.

        That has never happened in the history of mankind, and modern technological gadgets would be easily repairable if designers and engineers made it that way.

        We can go to Mars, create millions of vaccines in 5 months ... but we cannot make products that do not spoil when in the past we had less knowledge and the products lasted a lifetime? What kind of idiot must you be not to see this?

        There is a very good movie called "The Man in the White Suit", it is from 1950, at that time the problem of planned obsolescence was already appearing, that is, designing products that break down or that cannot be repaired when there is knowledge to make products more durable. This system was not attractive because neither the employers nor the employees wanted to cut their earnings or lose their jobs.

        As a result, we have a financial and labor system that does not take into account the sustainability of resources or the waste generated.

        The conspiracy is about people meeting and planning on something, this has nothing to do, it just has to do with making money. Although in a way, everything was made of poorer quality, the warranties were lowered and there created advertising to exchange products just for fashion although they were still perfectly functional ... yes, this can be called conspiracy, I don't know, but's not the point either.
        Beti, sometimes it's less cost and/or hassle to just get a new one. It's that simple.
        I saw a star, reached for it...and MISSED

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        • #19
          Hey I wasn't saying no conspiracy, I'm just a fix it first person. Seems wasteful is all that a simple rattle can't be fixed.
          My Journal:

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          • #20
            Originally posted by bluecountry View Post
            Hey I wasn't saying no conspiracy, I'm just a fix it first person. Seems wasteful is all that a simple rattle can't be fixed.
            Nothing wrong with that and I admire your desire to do it. My dad was big on fixing what you had and taking care of things, etc.
            Of course he grew up during the ( 1930's ) depression when most people had to make do or go without.

            However, I tend to be really practical and do the most convenient and cost effective thing when I have a choice.
            Obviously, things with antique or sentimental value would be saved due to their unique worth.
            I saw a star, reached for it...and MISSED

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