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Layne Norton

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  • [quote=Lomox;1571779]This is very intruiging... however I am sure it will go unnoticed. These seems to be an unwitten law against attacking supplements in general. I guess they fund the whole industry and no one wants to rock the boat. I think Layne is as straight up as they come in this biz so if someone will give a good answer its him. But I wouldnt blame him for not responding or to my earlier post about Arthur Jones and his views on supplemets and bodybuilding as a business.

    But you have certainly got my attention.[/quote

    yeah and ever since I found this out I threw out all my N.O samples I had laying around. It really makes sense especially with cellular growth and increased blood flow to the tumor. It could've had the "feeding the tumor" type effect. The doctor who performed the surgery is into working out and studies alot of supplements so I trust his word and am just not taking any chances. But I advise anyone to research arginine and cancer and you'll find some interesting studies for sure.

    Comment


    • [quote=natedogg;1572832]
      Originally posted by Lomox View Post
      This is very intruiging... however I am sure it will go unnoticed. These seems to be an unwitten law against attacking supplements in general. I guess they fund the whole industry and no one wants to rock the boat. I think Layne is as straight up as they come in this biz so if someone will give a good answer its him. But I wouldnt blame him for not responding or to my earlier post about Arthur Jones and his views on supplemets and bodybuilding as a business.

      But you have certainly got my attention.[/quote

      yeah and ever since I found this out I threw out all my N.O samples I had laying around. It really makes sense especially with cellular growth and increased blood flow to the tumor. It could've had the "feeding the tumor" type effect. The doctor who performed the surgery is into working out and studies alot of supplements so I trust his word and am just not taking any chances. But I advise anyone to research arginine and cancer and you'll find some interesting studies for sure.

      what about citruline ?

      Comment


      • Hey Layne, whats your opinion on this research/concept? http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/md92.htm

        Comment


        • [quote=paraman;1572894]
          Originally posted by natedogg View Post


          what about citruline ?
          well probably the same type of thing since citruline is a precursor to arginine.. But in my case i just stay away from most supplements in general, and citrulline would be one of them as well.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by David1991 View Post
            Hey Layne, whats your opinion on this research/concept? http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/md92.htm
            I have 2 words for you:

            1) Sales
            2) Pitch

            Sporto
            IFPA Natural Professional Bodybuilder
            Core Nutritionals Sales Rep

            Comment


            • how much muscle can a young natural bodybuilder put on in a year?
              age 23 and younger
              http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/ygbodybuilder10/

              Comment


              • Originally posted by gangsta1087 View Post
                how much muscle can a young natural bodybuilder put on in a year?
                age 23 and younger
                How long is a piece of string?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Mick_L View Post
                  How long is a piece of string?
                  lol well i know you cant say an exact number but whas the average
                  http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/ygbodybuilder10/

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by gangsta1087 View Post
                    lol well i know you cant say an exact number but whas the average
                    there is no average. Depends on how long youve been training, genetics, your eating habbits, sleep, your training, etc.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Sporto View Post
                      I have 2 words for you:

                      1) Sales
                      2) Pitch

                      Sporto
                      this

                      will try to get to these other questions at some point; wife's birthday this weekend so i'm focussing on her
                      BioLayne LLC
                      PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                      Scivation Athlete
                      MD Columnist
                      Website

                      Comment


                      • Great stuff, have a nice weekend.

                        I saw another of your articles posted online also, congrats-

                        http://www.musculardevelopment.com/c.../view/1684/51/

                        Contest Prep, Muscle building- http://www.trainwithsklayne.co.uk

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Sporto View Post
                          I have 2 words for you:

                          1) Sales
                          2) Pitch

                          Sporto

                          Originally posted by str8flexed View Post
                          this
                          Layne have you seen research on this? If it was just one source I would be a lot more skeptical but I have now seen it from Christian Thibaudeau, Dave Barr, and Mauro DiPasquale.

                          This is from Dave Barr ( http://www.simplyshredded.com/top-10...dave-barr.html ):

                          -Applying this principle, liquid pre workout meal consumption dramatically increases muscle blood flow and protein synthesis (Tipton et al., 2001). This elevation in muscle growth is at least twice that observed with the same drink taken post workout (Tipton et al., 2001)! In fact, this effect even lasts for an hour after the workout, so itís like having 2 drinks for the price of 1!

                          -Realistically though, as great as they are, a single post-workout meal will have minimal impact compared to what can happen if your nutrition is completely optimized. Of course itís heresy to say that these days, but thatís a result of the myth building on itself more than any factual data. For example, as discussed in the myth #2, pre-workout meals can be 200% more effective for stimulating muscle growth compared to post-workout (Tipton et al., 2001).

                          -Comparing research that used drinks consumed immediately after a workout (Tipton et al., 2001) versus those ingested an hour after training (Rasmussen et al., 2000), the results are surprising: it seems that post workout meal ingestion actually results in 30% lower protein synthesis rates than when we wait


                          It seems many now are starting to say it's best to jack up insulin pre-workout and then have only amino acids being taken in during/directly post workout while a full meal shouldn't be had until an hour or so later

                          Comment


                          • they are sorely misinterpreting the research, not really their fault as they are not familiar with the methods (stable isotope infusion to measure protein synthesis) The problem with the post workout measures and the reason whey they register lower are because you are using a steady state technique to measure a variable in a non-steady state (post workout is not steady state) it affects the flux of amino acids in the various pools and this gives you a different absolute # than would you would get from preworkout measurements.

                            Additionally, protein synthesis drops after training; and so your first meal is more of a meal to initiate recovery of protein synthesis to NORMAL level. so when you compare the absolute rate of protein synthesis in response to a pre workout meal compared to the post workout meal; yes the rate will be higher after the preworkout meal; not because that meal is more anabolic but because protein synthesis DROPS after a workout and the post workout meal just brings it back up to recover to baseline.

                            Again, 99% of the myths out there are simply from misinterpretation of the literature. In this case however, I can understand how it could be misinterpreted. Still, people shouldn't make such strong statements.
                            BioLayne LLC
                            PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                            Scivation Athlete
                            MD Columnist
                            Website

                            Comment


                            • they are sorely misinterpreting the research, not really their fault as they are not familiar with the methods (stable isotope infusion to measure protein synthesis) The problem with the post workout measures and the reason whey they register lower are because you are using a steady state technique to measure a variable in a non-steady state (post workout is not steady state) it affects the flux of amino acids in the various pools and this gives you a different absolute # than would you would get from preworkout measurements.

                              Additionally, protein synthesis drops after training; and so your first meal is more of a meal to initiate recovery of protein synthesis to NORMAL level. so when you compare the absolute rate of protein synthesis in response to a pre workout meal compared to the post workout meal; yes the rate will be higher after the preworkout meal; not because that meal is more anabolic but because protein synthesis DROPS after a workout and the post workout meal just brings it back up to recover to baseline.

                              Again, 99% of the myths out there are simply from misinterpretation of the literature. In this case however, I can understand how it could be misinterpreted. Still, people shouldn't make such strong statements.
                              BioLayne LLC
                              PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                              Scivation Athlete
                              MD Columnist
                              Website

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by NTT91 View Post
                                there is no average. Depends on how long youve been training, genetics, your eating habbits, sleep, your training, etc.
                                well what about me?
                                http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/ygbodybuilder10/

                                Comment

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