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Layne Norton

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  • Hey Bro, Good Luck next weekend!!!!!
    kiyoshimoody.com
    *TEAM GENR8* genr8speed.com

    Comment


    • thanks Kiyoshi, I appreciate it
      BioLayne LLC
      PhD, Nutritional Sciences
      Scivation Athlete
      MD Columnist
      Website

      Comment


      • Originally posted by spiderman405 View Post
        but i have noticed in the past whenever i would take glutamine that i would notice a for sure noticable gain in muscle and fullness. That is a definite.
        Absolutely. It's good for at least 60 lb a year.

        Comment


        • Hey Layne love all your science behind what you do and how you always want to do it better and better, your articles have helped me a lot with bodybuilding. But here is my question I am 20 years old and competed in my first show about a month ago... completely did all the wrong things for the peak and was listening to all the wrong advice ended up looking worse on stage than I did a week out. I am about 200lbs contest weight and get up to 230 in the off season but I am 6' 3 so I need to put on size I was just wondering if you think I should take a year or two off competing, to do that, or if I should plan to compete again next year?
          Thanks man and good luck in your up coming show... can't wait to see how you look.

          Comment


          • if you are going to stay natural and you want to make significant progress, I would take the year off competing
            BioLayne LLC
            PhD, Nutritional Sciences
            Scivation Athlete
            MD Columnist
            Website

            Comment


            • Thanks Layne and yes I plan to be natural all the way just trying to work smarter, I definitely have a different plan for the next time I compete, I just got this fire after my show to do it better, and better every time. But I got one more question... I have read your stuff on the bulks and cuts in the off season... and am gonna try it, do you still think that is the best strategy for making lean gains, or have other techniques come to light recently?

              Comment


              • Hey Layne, I was wondering if you could recommend any interesting studies to read, regarding training frequency? I know your a big advocate of higher frequency training (like training legs twice per week) and since I've started doing the same I've been making some gains I'm very happy with. I would be very interested in reading any studies you could recommend?

                Also what in your opinion are some of the most significant studies done with practical application to bodybuilding? (sorry, I know this is a pretty broad question)

                Comment


                • Creatine

                  Layne,

                  Do you think creatine ethyl ester has any advantages over creatine monohydrate?

                  Thanks

                  Comment


                  • Layne, any knowledge on soy milk? I'm not sure whether to avoid it, and other soy products, or not.

                    There are two conflicting schools of thought, one which says it's a weak estrogen that blocks the effects of real estrogen, and another which says it's highly estrogenic itself. I've looked around the net for anything of substance, but it's really hard to find anything definitive.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by lukebui007 View Post
                      Layne,

                      Do you think creatine ethyl ester has any advantages over creatine monohydrate?

                      Thanks
                      no absolutely not
                      BioLayne LLC
                      PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                      Scivation Athlete
                      MD Columnist
                      Website

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by jimmyW215 View Post
                        Thanks Layne and yes I plan to be natural all the way just trying to work smarter, I definitely have a different plan for the next time I compete, I just got this fire after my show to do it better, and better every time. But I got one more question... I have read your stuff on the bulks and cuts in the off season... and am gonna try it, do you still think that is the best strategy for making lean gains, or have other techniques come to light recently?
                        i think it's a good strategy, but the length of the bulk & cuts respectively are going to vary a lot from person to person depending upon many different factors
                        BioLayne LLC
                        PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                        Scivation Athlete
                        MD Columnist
                        Website

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Klaus Urine View Post
                          Layne, any knowledge on soy milk? I'm not sure whether to avoid it, and other soy products, or not.

                          There are two conflicting schools of thought, one which says it's a weak estrogen that blocks the effects of real estrogen, and another which says it's highly estrogenic itself. I've looked around the net for anything of substance, but it's really hard to find anything definitive.
                          wrote an article for this for MD. I guess I'll post it up here since it was over a year ago:

                          “We are double-edged blades, and every time we whet our virtue the return stroke straps our vice”
                          -Henry David Thoreau
                          It seems that in life, all good things come with a bit bad. The best tasting foods come with the most calories. The jobs that pay the most tend to be the highest stress. Sex often requires cuddling afterwards (Disclaimer to my lovely wife: I love cuddling with you; I am referring to every other man in the world not named Layne). Every coin has two sides. Every Yin has its Yang. In bodybuilding and fitness we often forget that there are two sides to every story and quite often there is also a gray area to be included in between the black and white. However, many bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts see everything in black and white. Protein is good, carbohydrates are bad. Omega 3’s are good, saturated fat is bad. Animal proteins are good, plant proteins suck. By now I’m sure you have all heard from various bodybuilding magazines that soy protein is the devil. I’m also sure you’ve seen various ‘wussy’ health publications talk about how soy is the cure to just about everything. But which edge of the sword does the truth lie on? Well as with most things, there is no clear cut answer no matter how you slice it.
                          Probably the biggest knock on soy is that it lowers testosterone. This notion is so engrained in bodybuilders that the idea of consuming soy to most bodybuilders is as repulsive as downing a gallon of fresh squeezed urine. But how real is this fear? Certainly there is some evidence that soy isoflavones can lower testosterone significantly in some animal models (1). In humans, there is some evidence that soy supplementation can modestly reduce testosterone in healthy men (2-4) and even reduce androgen receptor expression (5). These studies only find small reductions in testosterone. Couple this with the fact that several studies have shown no impact on soy protein supplementation on testosterone levels (5,6). More interestingly, a few studies have found that soy protein supplementation actually increasedtestosterone in rats fed a diet high in soy isoflavones over the duration of their life (7,8). Certainly these results seem counter-intuitive. One possible explanation could be that since soy isoflavones decrease androgen receptor expression, the body may be attempting to compensate for the lack of androgen receptors by increasing long term testosterone production. Perhaps the most relevant study to this discussion was performed by Kalman et al. in which subjects followed a weight training program for 12 weeks while supplementing with 50g/day of soy isolate, soy concentrate, whey protein, or a blend of whey and soy (9). At the end of the study all groups experienced increases in lean body mass but there were no significant differences in testosterone, body composition, or increases in lean body mass between the groups fed whey or soy. This seems to suggest that even high doses of soy protein do not interfere with anabolic responses to weight training, at least in the short term.
                          Though Kalman et al. found no differences between soy and whey for changes in lean body mass, there is cellular data indicating that soy does have an inhibitory effect on the mTOR anabolic pathway in muscle cells. Soy has been demonstrated to increase the activation of AMP Protein Kinase (AMPK) (10). AMPK performs several tasks once activated and one of these is to inhibit mTOR signaling. Research from Anthony et al. corroborated this by demonstrating that mice fed soy had lower levels of mTOR activation than those fed whey protein (11). This is not real surprising however since whey has about 50% greater leucine content than soy and leucine is the amino acid responsible for stimulating protein synthesis in muscle. What is surprising is preliminary data from our lab which suggests that egg may be superior to soy in stimulating protein synthesis even though both have similar leucine contents (12). Thus, it seems that on a cellular level, soy may reduce the anabolic signaling compared to other protein sources, possibly via stimulating AMPK.
                          Although soy activates AMPK, like every double edged sword, there is still another way to slice soy’s AMPK activation. Though it inhibits mTOR, AMPK also does several GOOD things like increasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, mostly by increasing GLUT-4 (glucose receptor responsible for insulin stimulated glucose disposal in muscle) content in the muscle cell membrane (13). There is quite a bit of evidence to suggest that supplementation with soy protein can increase insulin sensitivity and may even help inhibit fat gain in animal models of diet induced obesity (10,14).
                          Soy has gotten quite a bad rap in the bodybuilding community and is perceived by many meatheads to be a ‘sissy’ protein. On the other side of the coin, many knucklehead, tree humping, bark biting vegetarians will claim that soy is the end all be all to cure cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. As with most things in life, the truth lies somewhere in between both extremes. The jury is still out on soy’s effects on testosterone and more research needs to be placed on examining soy’s impact on AMPK and mTOR signaling. However, I believe that soy can be consumed by bodybuilders in moderate amounts without impairing muscle gains. If one is concerned about soy’s potential to inhibit mTOR, then I suggest combining soy with a protein high in leucine content like whey which can help maximize mTOR signaling. Another option might also be supplementing soy with free form leucine or BCAAs in order to help maximize mTOR signaling and muscle anabolism. It will be interesting to see how the research on soy plays out in the coming years, but one thing is certain; soy supplementation is a topic that cuts both ways.

                          References
                          1. Weber KS, Setchell KD, Stocco DM, Lephart ED. Dietary soy-phytoestrogens decrease testosterone levels and prostate weight without altering LH, prostate 5alpha-reductase or testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory peptide levels in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. J Endocrinol. 2001 Sep;170(3):591-9.

                          2. Goodin S, Shen F, Shih WJ, Dave N, Kane MP, Medina P, Lambert GH, Aisner J, Gallo M, DiPaola RS. Clinical and biological activity of soy protein powder supplementation in healthy male volunteers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Apr;16(4):829-33.

                          3. van Veldhuizen PJ, Thrasher JB, Ray G, Cherian R, Ward J, Holzbeierlein J, Gutow S, Banerjee SK. Dose effect of soy supplementation in prostate cancer: a pilot study. Oncol Rep. 2006 Dec;16(6):1221-4.

                          4. Dillingham BL, McVeigh BL, Lampe JW, Duncan AM. Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content exert minor effects on serum reproductive hormones in healthy young men. J Nutr. 2005 Mar;135(3):584-91.

                          5. Hamilton-Reeves JM, Rebello SA, Thomas W, Slaton JW, Kurzer MS. Isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate suppresses androgen receptor expression without altering estrogen receptor-beta expression or serum hormonal profiles in men at high risk of prostate cancer. J Nutr. 2007 Jul;137(7):1769-75.

                          6. Kurzer MS. Hormonal effects of soy in premenopausal women and men. J Nutr. 2002 Mar;132(3):570S-573S. Review.

                          7. Yi MA, Son HM, Lee JS, Kwon CS, Lim JK, Yeo YK, Park YS, Kim JS. Regulation of male sex hormone levels by soy isoflavones in rats. Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(2):206-10.

                          8. McVey MJ, Cooke GM, Curran IH. Increased serum and testicular androgen levels in F1 rats with lifetime exposure to soy isoflavones. Reprod Toxicol. 2004 Jul;18(5):677-85.

                          9. Kalman D, Feldman S, Martinez M, Krieger DR, Tallon MJ. Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2007 Jul 23;4:4.

                          10. Cederroth CR, Vinciguerra M, Gjinovci A, Kühne F, Klein M, Cederroth M, Caille D, Suter M, Neumann D, James RW, Doerge DR, Wallimann T, Meda P, Foti M, Rohner-Jeanrenaud F, Vassalli JD, Nef S. Dietary phytoestrogens activate AMP-activated protein kinase with improvement in lipid and glucose metabolism. Diabetes. 2008 May;57(5):1176-85.

                          11. Anthony TG, McDaniel BJ, Knoll P, Bunpo P, Paul GL, McNurlan MA. Feeding meals containing soy or whey protein after exercise stimulates protein synthesis and translation initiation in the skeletal muscle of male rats. J Nutr. 2007 Feb;137(2):357-62.

                          12. Norton LE, Wilson GJ, Rupassara I, Garlick PJ, Layman DK. (2009) Leucine contents of isonitrogenous protein sources predict postprandial skeletal muscle protein synthesis in rats fed a complete meal 2009 Experimental Biology meeting abstracts, Abstract #227.4

                          13. Jessen N, Pold R, Buhl ES, Jensen LS, Schmitz O, Lund S. Effects of AICAR and exercise on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, signaling, and GLUT-4 content in rat muscles. J Appl Physiol. 2003 Apr;94(4):1373-9.

                          14. Jang EH, Moon JS, Ko JH, Ahn CW, Lee HH, Shin JK, Park CS, Kang JH. Novel black soy peptides with antiobesity effects: activation of leptin-like signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase. Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Jul;32(7):1161-70.
                          BioLayne LLC
                          PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                          Scivation Athlete
                          MD Columnist
                          Website

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by str8flexed View Post
                            wrote an article for this for MD. I guess I'll post it up here since it was over a year ago:

                            “We are double-edged blades, and every time we whet our virtue the return stroke straps our vice”
                            -Henry David Thoreau
                            It seems that in life, all good things come with a bit bad. The best tasting foods come with the most calories. The jobs that pay the most tend to be the highest stress. Sex often requires cuddling afterwards (Disclaimer to my lovely wife: I love cuddling with you; I am referring to every other man in the world not named Layne). Every coin has two sides. Every Yin has its Yang. In bodybuilding and fitness we often forget that there are two sides to every story and quite often there is also a gray area to be included in between the black and white. However, many bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts see everything in black and white. Protein is good, carbohydrates are bad. Omega 3’s are good, saturated fat is bad. Animal proteins are good, plant proteins suck. By now I’m sure you have all heard from various bodybuilding magazines that soy protein is the devil. I’m also sure you’ve seen various ‘wussy’ health publications talk about how soy is the cure to just about everything. But which edge of the sword does the truth lie on? Well as with most things, there is no clear cut answer no matter how you slice it.
                            Probably the biggest knock on soy is that it lowers testosterone. This notion is so engrained in bodybuilders that the idea of consuming soy to most bodybuilders is as repulsive as downing a gallon of fresh squeezed urine. But how real is this fear? Certainly there is some evidence that soy isoflavones can lower testosterone significantly in some animal models (1). In humans, there is some evidence that soy supplementation can modestly reduce testosterone in healthy men (2-4) and even reduce androgen receptor expression (5). These studies only find small reductions in testosterone. Couple this with the fact that several studies have shown no impact on soy protein supplementation on testosterone levels (5,6). More interestingly, a few studies have found that soy protein supplementation actually increasedtestosterone in rats fed a diet high in soy isoflavones over the duration of their life (7,8). Certainly these results seem counter-intuitive. One possible explanation could be that since soy isoflavones decrease androgen receptor expression, the body may be attempting to compensate for the lack of androgen receptors by increasing long term testosterone production. Perhaps the most relevant study to this discussion was performed by Kalman et al. in which subjects followed a weight training program for 12 weeks while supplementing with 50g/day of soy isolate, soy concentrate, whey protein, or a blend of whey and soy (9). At the end of the study all groups experienced increases in lean body mass but there were no significant differences in testosterone, body composition, or increases in lean body mass between the groups fed whey or soy. This seems to suggest that even high doses of soy protein do not interfere with anabolic responses to weight training, at least in the short term.
                            Though Kalman et al. found no differences between soy and whey for changes in lean body mass, there is cellular data indicating that soy does have an inhibitory effect on the mTOR anabolic pathway in muscle cells. Soy has been demonstrated to increase the activation of AMP Protein Kinase (AMPK) (10). AMPK performs several tasks once activated and one of these is to inhibit mTOR signaling. Research from Anthony et al. corroborated this by demonstrating that mice fed soy had lower levels of mTOR activation than those fed whey protein (11). This is not real surprising however since whey has about 50% greater leucine content than soy and leucine is the amino acid responsible for stimulating protein synthesis in muscle. What is surprising is preliminary data from our lab which suggests that egg may be superior to soy in stimulating protein synthesis even though both have similar leucine contents (12). Thus, it seems that on a cellular level, soy may reduce the anabolic signaling compared to other protein sources, possibly via stimulating AMPK.
                            Although soy activates AMPK, like every double edged sword, there is still another way to slice soy’s AMPK activation. Though it inhibits mTOR, AMPK also does several GOOD things like increasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, mostly by increasing GLUT-4 (glucose receptor responsible for insulin stimulated glucose disposal in muscle) content in the muscle cell membrane (13). There is quite a bit of evidence to suggest that supplementation with soy protein can increase insulin sensitivity and may even help inhibit fat gain in animal models of diet induced obesity (10,14).
                            Soy has gotten quite a bad rap in the bodybuilding community and is perceived by many meatheads to be a ‘sissy’ protein. On the other side of the coin, many knucklehead, tree humping, bark biting vegetarians will claim that soy is the end all be all to cure cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. As with most things in life, the truth lies somewhere in between both extremes. The jury is still out on soy’s effects on testosterone and more research needs to be placed on examining soy’s impact on AMPK and mTOR signaling. However, I believe that soy can be consumed by bodybuilders in moderate amounts without impairing muscle gains. If one is concerned about soy’s potential to inhibit mTOR, then I suggest combining soy with a protein high in leucine content like whey which can help maximize mTOR signaling. Another option might also be supplementing soy with free form leucine or BCAAs in order to help maximize mTOR signaling and muscle anabolism. It will be interesting to see how the research on soy plays out in the coming years, but one thing is certain; soy supplementation is a topic that cuts both ways.

                            References
                            1. Weber KS, Setchell KD, Stocco DM, Lephart ED. Dietary soy-phytoestrogens decrease testosterone levels and prostate weight without altering LH, prostate 5alpha-reductase or testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory peptide levels in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. J Endocrinol. 2001 Sep;170(3):591-9.

                            2. Goodin S, Shen F, Shih WJ, Dave N, Kane MP, Medina P, Lambert GH, Aisner J, Gallo M, DiPaola RS. Clinical and biological activity of soy protein powder supplementation in healthy male volunteers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Apr;16(4):829-33.

                            3. van Veldhuizen PJ, Thrasher JB, Ray G, Cherian R, Ward J, Holzbeierlein J, Gutow S, Banerjee SK. Dose effect of soy supplementation in prostate cancer: a pilot study. Oncol Rep. 2006 Dec;16(6):1221-4.

                            4. Dillingham BL, McVeigh BL, Lampe JW, Duncan AM. Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content exert minor effects on serum reproductive hormones in healthy young men. J Nutr. 2005 Mar;135(3):584-91.

                            5. Hamilton-Reeves JM, Rebello SA, Thomas W, Slaton JW, Kurzer MS. Isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate suppresses androgen receptor expression without altering estrogen receptor-beta expression or serum hormonal profiles in men at high risk of prostate cancer. J Nutr. 2007 Jul;137(7):1769-75.

                            6. Kurzer MS. Hormonal effects of soy in premenopausal women and men. J Nutr. 2002 Mar;132(3):570S-573S. Review.

                            7. Yi MA, Son HM, Lee JS, Kwon CS, Lim JK, Yeo YK, Park YS, Kim JS. Regulation of male sex hormone levels by soy isoflavones in rats. Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(2):206-10.

                            8. McVey MJ, Cooke GM, Curran IH. Increased serum and testicular androgen levels in F1 rats with lifetime exposure to soy isoflavones. Reprod Toxicol. 2004 Jul;18(5):677-85.

                            9. Kalman D, Feldman S, Martinez M, Krieger DR, Tallon MJ. Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2007 Jul 23;4:4.

                            10. Cederroth CR, Vinciguerra M, Gjinovci A, Kühne F, Klein M, Cederroth M, Caille D, Suter M, Neumann D, James RW, Doerge DR, Wallimann T, Meda P, Foti M, Rohner-Jeanrenaud F, Vassalli JD, Nef S. Dietary phytoestrogens activate AMP-activated protein kinase with improvement in lipid and glucose metabolism. Diabetes. 2008 May;57(5):1176-85.

                            11. Anthony TG, McDaniel BJ, Knoll P, Bunpo P, Paul GL, McNurlan MA. Feeding meals containing soy or whey protein after exercise stimulates protein synthesis and translation initiation in the skeletal muscle of male rats. J Nutr. 2007 Feb;137(2):357-62.

                            12. Norton LE, Wilson GJ, Rupassara I, Garlick PJ, Layman DK. (2009) Leucine contents of isonitrogenous protein sources predict postprandial skeletal muscle protein synthesis in rats fed a complete meal 2009 Experimental Biology meeting abstracts, Abstract #227.4

                            13. Jessen N, Pold R, Buhl ES, Jensen LS, Schmitz O, Lund S. Effects of AICAR and exercise on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, signaling, and GLUT-4 content in rat muscles. J Appl Physiol. 2003 Apr;94(4):1373-9.

                            14. Jang EH, Moon JS, Ko JH, Ahn CW, Lee HH, Shin JK, Park CS, Kang JH. Novel black soy peptides with antiobesity effects: activation of leptin-like signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase. Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Jul;32(7):1161-70.
                            Thanks, I appreciate it. Those damned shades of gray again...

                            By the way, I haven't been on this site in a quite a while. By the Look of your avatar, seems you've put on some significant size there, man. Kudos.

                            Comment


                            • actually I've lost 30 lbs (dieting for a show). it's all about the illusion
                              BioLayne LLC
                              PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                              Scivation Athlete
                              MD Columnist
                              Website

                              Comment


                              • radio interview I just did regarding my pro debut this weekend


                                http://naturalbodybuildingradio.com/...nd-jan-rowlett
                                BioLayne LLC
                                PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                                Scivation Athlete
                                MD Columnist
                                Website

                                Comment

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