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Layne Norton

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  • sorry my previous post was referring to bigjimsty

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    • hi layne what do you think about including 10-20 grams oh hydrolised protein including the 10-15 grams of bcaas that i know you use? would the protein slow the digestion of the bcaas like normal whey isolate or not since it is pre-digested?

      Comment


      • Hi Layne, I've been doing your following your phat regiment for about a year now and its working well. On the heavy days I'm warming up and then doing 5 sets of a weight that I can do for 3-5 reps. The question I have for you or anyone else on here is: Do you use the same weight to go to failure with every set or are you continueously adding weight and going to failure on the last set or two? I've read your old logs and it seems you picked one weight to use, but in your recent videos with Paul Revelia on simplyshredded.com it appeared that you guys were increasing the weight to reach failure. Have you found adding weight to be more effective or do you just switch it up.

        Comment


        • Hey Layne, how prominent would you say the effects of BCAA's are for most people who are already eating very high protein? I took them for about 2.5 months, 20g of off days and 30g on workout days (4:1:1 blend) and didn't really notice anything when starting or stopping use. Is that abnormal?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by StuchWSU View Post
            sorry my previous post was referring to bigjimsty
            Hey mate. No disrespect at all to you, I could argue back & forth between yourself, Layne and the others regarding meat and its' safety. Whatever you believe I'm cool with, it is however something I have been researching for over 10yrs now. I have so many research papers and studies (for and against btw), I even have an alert on my computer that sends any media links to me whenever someone reaches 100yrs old. I then follow that up and look into any patterns that correlate with health and longevity. I'm happy to PM any studies to interested parties, here's a few quick ones from my laptop (the majority are all stored on hard drive which I don't have with me right now). Thanks J.
            ____________________

            Eating red meat increases the risk of colon cancer by 40%.
            From the landmark European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. EPIC was designed to investigate the relationships between diet, nutritional status, lifestyle and environmental factors and the incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases. EPIC is the largest study of diet and health ever undertaken, having recruited over half a million (520,000) people in ten European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Within these countries EPIC research scientists are based in 23 centres: one in France (Paris), Greece (Athens) and Norway (Tromsų), two in Denmark (Aarhus and Copenhagen), Germany (Heidelberg and Potsdam), Sweden (Malmo and Umea), the Netherlands (Bilthoven and Utrecht) and the United Kingdom (Cambridge and Oxford), five in Italy (Florence, Milan, Naples, Ragusa and Turin) and Spain (Granada, Murcia, Asturias, Pamplona, and San Sebastian with Barcelona the co-ordination centre). Originally there were 7 countries involved but between 1995 and 2000 Sweden, Denmark and Norway, which were already involved in similar studies, joined EPIC and thus broadened the European cohort to include Scandinavian populations. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) is coordinated by Dr Elio Riboli, Head of the Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care at the Imperial College London in the United Kingdom. AND Study by American Cancer Society researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Vol. 293, No. 2: 172-182). It is based on a long-term study of about 149,000 people between 50 and 74 years old. The participants filled out a questionnaire detailing their eating habits in 1982, and again in 1992/1993. The leader of the study was Michael Thun, MD, MS, chief of epidemiology and surveillance research at ACS. Thun and his colleagues looked at how many people had developed the disease by 2001; they then analyzed the risk according to the amount of meat that was consumed. The participants who consumed the most red meat in both time periods were 30% to 40% more likely to develop cancer in the lower part of their colon, compared to the participants who ate the least. The people who ate the most processed meats were 50% more likely to develop colon cancer and 20% more likely to develop rectal cancer compared to those who ate the least. AND Three of eight case-control studies examining the relationship between renal cell carcinoma and meat consumption found a statistically significant increase in risk with a high consumption of meat.

            Eating fried meat increases your rectal cancer risk by 60%.
            Butler LM, Sinha R, Millikan RC, Martin CF, Newman B, Gammon MD, Ammerman AS, Sandler RS. Heterocyclic amines, meat intake, and association with colon cancer in a population-based study. Am J Epidemiol. 2003;157(5):434-445. This was a case-control study in North Carolina that analyzed meat intake by level of doneness, cooking method, and estimated intake of HCAs in 620 colon cancer patients and 1038 controls, found that not only was red meat intake positively associated with colon cancer risk, but also pan-frying was the riskiest way to prepare meat due to high HCA formation. AND Norat T, Riboli E. Meat consumption and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic evidence. Nutr Rev. 2001;59(2):37-47.

            Eating beef, pork, or lamb daily triples your colon cancer risk compared to vegetarians. Giovannucci E, Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Ascherio A, Willett WC. Intake of fat, meat, and fiber in relation to risk of colon cancer in men.
            Cancer Res. 1994;54(9):2390-2397. AND Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Speizer FE. Relation of meat, fat, and fiber intake to the risk of colon cancer in a prospective study among women. N Engl J Med. 1990;323:1664-1672.

            Cooked meat becomes a source of carcinogens and mutagens, such as HCAs, some of which are distributed to the mammary gland, increasing breast cancer formation.
            Snyderwine EG. Some perspectives on the nutritional aspects of breast cancer research. Food-derived heterocyclic amines as etiologic agents in human mammary cancer. Cancer. 1994;74(3 suppl):1070-1077.

            Breast cancer risk rises by up to 200% among those who consume beef or pork five to six times per week.
            Bingham SA. Meat, starch, and non-starch polysaccharides and bowel cancer. Am J Clin. Nutr 1988;48:762-7.
            ____________________

            As I stated before, I am actually not a vegetarian. I do eat a little meat but I feel better when my meat intake is lower. Cheers guys

            Comment


            • Originally posted by StuchWSU View Post
              I am not debating whether or not it is bad for you, your avi looks good and I am sure you were a fit and healthy guy, and most of your posts seem well thought out, I mean no disrespect and I am not trying to be a smart ass, but what layne explained between a correlation and cause and effect is what most people fail to realize when making a statement based on science, my point is you can justify almost any argument with a correlation, high reps=ripped for example,
              Thanks for taking the time to write that mate, appreciate it

              Comment


              • Originally posted by bigjimsty View Post
                Hey mate. No disrespect at all to you, I could argue back & forth between yourself, Layne and the others regarding meat and its' safety. Whatever you believe I'm cool with, it is however something I have been researching for over 10yrs now. I have so many research papers and studies (for and against btw), I even have an alert on my computer that sends any media links to me whenever someone reaches 100yrs old. I then follow that up and look into any patterns that correlate with health and longevity. I'm happy to PM any studies to interested parties, here's a few quick ones from my laptop (the majority are all stored on hard drive which I don't have with me right now). Thanks J.
                ____________________

                Eating red meat increases the risk of colon cancer by 40%.
                From the landmark European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. EPIC was designed to investigate the relationships between diet, nutritional status, lifestyle and environmental factors and the incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases. EPIC is the largest study of diet and health ever undertaken, having recruited over half a million (520,000) people in ten European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Within these countries EPIC research scientists are based in 23 centres: one in France (Paris), Greece (Athens) and Norway (Tromsų), two in Denmark (Aarhus and Copenhagen), Germany (Heidelberg and Potsdam), Sweden (Malmo and Umea), the Netherlands (Bilthoven and Utrecht) and the United Kingdom (Cambridge and Oxford), five in Italy (Florence, Milan, Naples, Ragusa and Turin) and Spain (Granada, Murcia, Asturias, Pamplona, and San Sebastian with Barcelona the co-ordination centre). Originally there were 7 countries involved but between 1995 and 2000 Sweden, Denmark and Norway, which were already involved in similar studies, joined EPIC and thus broadened the European cohort to include Scandinavian populations. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) is coordinated by Dr Elio Riboli, Head of the Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care at the Imperial College London in the United Kingdom. AND Study by American Cancer Society researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Vol. 293, No. 2: 172-182). It is based on a long-term study of about 149,000 people between 50 and 74 years old. The participants filled out a questionnaire detailing their eating habits in 1982, and again in 1992/1993. The leader of the study was Michael Thun, MD, MS, chief of epidemiology and surveillance research at ACS. Thun and his colleagues looked at how many people had developed the disease by 2001; they then analyzed the risk according to the amount of meat that was consumed. The participants who consumed the most red meat in both time periods were 30% to 40% more likely to develop cancer in the lower part of their colon, compared to the participants who ate the least. The people who ate the most processed meats were 50% more likely to develop colon cancer and 20% more likely to develop rectal cancer compared to those who ate the least. AND Three of eight case-control studies examining the relationship between renal cell carcinoma and meat consumption found a statistically significant increase in risk with a high consumption of meat.

                Eating fried meat increases your rectal cancer risk by 60%.
                Butler LM, Sinha R, Millikan RC, Martin CF, Newman B, Gammon MD, Ammerman AS, Sandler RS. Heterocyclic amines, meat intake, and association with colon cancer in a population-based study. Am J Epidemiol. 2003;157(5):434-445. This was a case-control study in North Carolina that analyzed meat intake by level of doneness, cooking method, and estimated intake of HCAs in 620 colon cancer patients and 1038 controls, found that not only was red meat intake positively associated with colon cancer risk, but also pan-frying was the riskiest way to prepare meat due to high HCA formation. AND Norat T, Riboli E. Meat consumption and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic evidence. Nutr Rev. 2001;59(2):37-47.

                Eating beef, pork, or lamb daily triples your colon cancer risk compared to vegetarians. Giovannucci E, Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Ascherio A, Willett WC. Intake of fat, meat, and fiber in relation to risk of colon cancer in men.
                Cancer Res. 1994;54(9):2390-2397. AND Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Speizer FE. Relation of meat, fat, and fiber intake to the risk of colon cancer in a prospective study among women. N Engl J Med. 1990;323:1664-1672.

                Cooked meat becomes a source of carcinogens and mutagens, such as HCAs, some of which are distributed to the mammary gland, increasing breast cancer formation.
                Snyderwine EG. Some perspectives on the nutritional aspects of breast cancer research. Food-derived heterocyclic amines as etiologic agents in human mammary cancer. Cancer. 1994;74(3 suppl):1070-1077.

                Breast cancer risk rises by up to 200% among those who consume beef or pork five to six times per week.
                Bingham SA. Meat, starch, and non-starch polysaccharides and bowel cancer. Am J Clin. Nutr 1988;48:762-7.
                ____________________

                As I stated before, I am actually not a vegetarian. I do eat a little meat but I feel better when my meat intake is lower. Cheers guys
                Again, as I stated before, all of this is correlation, not causational. And as explained before, once you correct for fiber intake and fat intake, these correlations disappear.
                BioLayne LLC
                PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                Scivation Athlete
                MD Columnist
                Website

                Comment


                • Please let me know when your commentary on the high repetitions study is up or out.
                  pistolthedon to mike arnold: "I want to melt inside you."

                  Comment


                  • Fucking A. I might have to rethink my CNS destroying tactic of mainly low rep sets.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Dr Pangloss View Post
                      Please let me know when your commentary on the high repetitions study is up or out.
                      I'm also very interested

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Dr Pangloss View Post
                        Please let me know when your commentary on the high repetitions study is up or out.
                        i believe it should be in the next issue of MD... the february edition i believe
                        BioLayne LLC
                        PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                        Scivation Athlete
                        MD Columnist
                        Website

                        Comment


                        • Layne whats your take on cardio when dieting. I am an athlete and I am just walking on an incline now but would much rather do HIIT cardio. I think I have read before that you prefer this also.

                          Comment


                          • I was just reading through the thread and saw where you prefer HIIT cardio. Sorry about asking the same question. I see you get that alot.

                            Comment


                            • Layne, if you get chance I would like your feedback on the thread about 13 weeks out from 1st comp. I posted some pics and respect your opinion. Thanks man

                              Comment


                              • Layne, question for you on training frequency.

                                I know you are a proponent of hitting the muscle multiple time per week.

                                Obviously that implies you feel that 2 times per week is more beneficial than 1 time per week for muscle growth.

                                However, when I hit my legs, I have a certain workout that I LOVE, that destroys my legs so badly that it would literally be dangerous to hit them again 3 days later, and they are literally still very sore on day 5. I have done this routine 6 weeks straight and the soreness never subsides to where I can train my legs a 2nd time that week.

                                My question is do you think I should either tone down that workout a bit, or flat out change it, so that I can get in a 2nd workout per week, or should I just stick with the one workout per week for legs?

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