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Layne Norton

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  • #76
    Layne,

    Im curious on your last week prep ... How do you go about it ??? I would like to know how you do your water, carb up, deplete, ect, ect...Can you give us a brief rundown on your last week ???

    thanks for your time

    chris250
    SPONSORED BY MUSCLECHEMISTRY.COM

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    • #77
      Man Layne you sure get around...


      My workout by Layne Str8flexed Norton
      http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=716355
      Are you gonna live your life, or are you biding time till you die?

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      • #78
        this says it all

        http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/layne36.htm

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        • #79
          Originally posted by str8flexed View Post
          actually in most strength athletes they find they use protein more effectively and thus 'need' less. again does eating more provide metabolic benefits? That has yet to be seen. Most of these studies have looked at nitrogen balance which only tells you whether a person is anabolic or catabolic and doesn't really give you an idea to the degree they are and it also doesn't let you know what tissues are retaining or losing the nitrogen. The other method is whole body amino acid fluxes, essentially labeling amino acids and watching where they go. The problem with both of these is they do not account for recycling of the amino acids nor do they take into account that tissues like the gut turnover very rapidly and so much of the flux of amino acids is from the gut whereas skeletal muscle turns over comparatively slowly. For example, the people concluding casien is better than whey looked at whole body amino acid fluxes and concluded that casein reduced breakdown better than whey... BUT THEY LOOKED AT WHOLE BODY PROTEIN BREAKDOWN. that tells you jack shit. In order to get good information you have to look at fractional rates of synthesis and degradation in the skeletal muscle which 1) is much more difficult 2) more expensive 3) requires more skill and 4) requires a biopsy. Thus it is oft not used in studies.

          Right now we are developing a rat model where we are measuring fractional synthesis rates. 2 main questions we are looking at is 1) how much protein at a meal does it take to max the system? 2) how long does the effect last 3) how long after an initial meal can you trigger synthesis again.

          We have characterized #2 as of now... still working on the other 2.
          This is the crux of my PhD thesis

          As far as your question, we simply don't know as of now.
          -Layne

          i have no clue what this means but... i am glad there are some smart people to help us out. TA please dont.... with the laser bullshit your out matched.

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by chris250 View Post
            Layne,

            Im curious on your last week prep ... How do you go about it ??? I would like to know how you do your water, carb up, deplete, ect, ect...Can you give us a brief rundown on your last week ???

            thanks for your time

            chris250
            chris,
            I would read the article that craig (cytrainer) linked. Especially the final week section. If you have any more questions about it shoot me a PM be more than happy to answer any other questions
            BioLayne LLC
            PhD, Nutritional Sciences
            Scivation Athlete
            MD Columnist
            Website

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by bbjeff86 View Post
              Layne once your thesis is all done, will it be available to the public... or atleast the info in it... sounds like some really good info will be involved.

              -Jeff
              well i'm sure many of the studies will be available through pubmed. I do have a review article in the journal of nutrition, i believe the fulltext is available through pubmed.

              Here is the link http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/136/2/533S
              Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise.


              -Layne
              BioLayne LLC
              PhD, Nutritional Sciences
              Scivation Athlete
              MD Columnist
              Website

              Comment


              • #82
                http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet...cvips&gifs=yes

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                • #83
                  30 November 2006
                  Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray FEL (Condensed by Brad Plummer from a press release issued by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)



                  Scientists have for the first time used an extremely short and intense coherent soft x-ray laser pulse to successfully obtain a high-resolution image of a nano-scale object before the sample was destroyed by the energy impact of the pulse. The experiment, conducted at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg by a collaboration that included researchers from the Photon Science Directorate at SLAC, also set a speed record of 25 femtoseconds for the duration of the x-ray pulse used to acquire the image. The results are published in the November 12 online edition and the December printed edition of Nature Physics.
                  Using the soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY at a 32 nm wavelength, the international collaboration led by Janos Hajdu (SLAC and Uppsala University) and Henry Chapman (LLNL) exposed a sample that contained nanometer-sized objects and recorded the x-ray diffraction pattern using a novel fast detector. A special computer algorithm was then used to recreate an image of the object based on the recorded diffraction pattern.
                  The technique used to capture the image is called "flash diffraction imaging," and this experiment proves the principle behind atomic-scale imaging that will be applied when even more powerful x-ray free-electron lasers are available, such as the LCLS, now under construction at SLAC; the SPring-8 SCSS facility in Japan; and the European XFEL in Hamburg. According to researchers, these revolutionary FELs will give scientists unprecedented insight into structural dynamics of a variety of materials.
                  The work was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development strategic initiative proposal for "biological imaging with fourth-generation light sources" at LLNL, and by Swedish Research Councils. To learn more about this research see the full technical highlight at:
                  http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/research/highlights_archive/flash.html H. N. Chapman, A. Barty, M. J. Bogan, S. Boutel, M. Frank, S. P. Hau-Reige, S. Marchesini, B. W. Woods, S. Bajt, W. Henry. Benner, R. A. London, E. Plönjes, M. Kuhlmann, R. Treusch, S. Düsterer, T. Tschentscher, J. R. Schneider, E. Spiller, T. Möller, C. Bostedt, M. Hoener, D. A. Shapiro, K. O. Hodgson, D. van der Spoel, F. Burmeister, M. Bergh, C. Caleman, G. Huldt, M. Seibert, F. R. N. C. Maia, R. W. Lee, A. Szöke, N. Timneanu and J. Hajdu, "Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser", Nat. Phys. Published online: 12 November 2006 | doi:10.1038/nphys461



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                  • #84
                    Letter abstract

                    Nature Physics 2, 839 - 843 (2006)
                    doi:10.1038/nphys461
                    Subject Categories: Optical physics | Techniques and instrumentation
                    Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

                    Henry N. Chapman1,2, Anton Barty1, Michael J. Bogan1, Sébastien Boutet1,3,4, Matthias Frank1, Stefan P. Hau-Riege1, Stefano Marchesini1,2, Bruce W. Woods1, Saa Bajt1, W. Henry Benner1, Richard A. London1,2, Elke Plönjes5, Marion Kuhlmann5, Rolf Treusch5, Stefan Düsterer5, Thomas Tschentscher5, Jochen R. Schneider5, Eberhard Spiller6, Thomas Möller7, Christoph Bostedt7, Matthias Hoener7, David A. Shapiro2, Keith O. Hodgson3, David van der Spoel4, Florian Burmeister4, Magnus Bergh4, Carl Caleman4, Gösta Huldt4, M. Marvin Seibert4, Filipe R. N. C. Maia4, Richard W. Lee1,4, Abraham Szöke1,4, Nicusor Timneanu4 and Janos Hajdu3,4
                    Top of page Theory predicts1, 2, 3, 4 that, with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 41013 W cm-2 pulse, containing 1012 photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nanostructured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single-photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling5, 6, 7, 8, 9, shows no measurable damage, and is reconstructed at the diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one10.

                    Top of page
                    1. <LI id=a1>University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550, USA <LI id=a2>Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, 2700 Stockton Blvd, Suite 1400, Sacramento, California 95817, USA <LI id=a3>Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94305, USA <LI id=a4>Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3, Box 596, SE-75124 Uppsala, Sweden <LI id=a5>Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestrae 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany <LI id=a6>Spiller X-ray Optics, Livermore, California 94550, USA
                    2. Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrae 36, PN 3-1, 10623 Berlin, Germany
                    Correspondence to: Henry N. Chapman1,2 e-mail: henry.chapman@llnl.gov
                    Correspondence to: Janos Hajdu3,4 e-mail: janos.hajdu@xray.bmc.uu.se

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                    • #85
                      I can help you understand Electron Laser Imaging if you have any questions.

                      Eventually this is what you will be using one day.

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                      • #86
                        i'm still not sure i understand how it could be used to measure fractional rates of protein synthesis & breakdown
                        BioLayne LLC
                        PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                        Scivation Athlete
                        MD Columnist
                        Website

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Hi Layne. Just wondering about abdominal fat.

                          We're bombarded with the message that abdominal fat is dangerous, causing insulin insensitivity etc. Does this encompass all abdominal fat or is it specifically visceral or subcutaneous fat which causes these negative effects?

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                          • #88
                            not really the subcutaneous fat which is bad, but the visceral fat is much worse. Now I don't know if it's actually the visceral fat that is causing problems but we do know that the "beer gut" phenotype is much more associated with diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure than just someone who has fat equally distributed... whether visceral fat causes that or is just a side affect of the primary cause we do not know as of now.

                            -Layne
                            BioLayne LLC
                            PhD, Nutritional Sciences
                            Scivation Athlete
                            MD Columnist
                            Website

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              layne what do you eat right before you go on stage? i hear lots of crazy things alcohol, candy, ricecakes, jelly, salt, etc... whats really good thanks bro
                              -IRON MAN ATHLETICS
                              -HARDCORE/PROFROMANCE WEAR
                              -COMING EARLY SEPT

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by str8flexed View Post
                                i'm still not sure i understand how it could be used to measure fractional rates of protein synthesis & breakdown
                                I am assuming the your current method is injected dye correct?

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